Author Topic: Royal Russia - the magazine  (Read 8528 times)

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Offline Belochka

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Royal Russia - the magazine
« on: July 10, 2014, 01:56:07 AM »
I want to share my latest exciting news with A. P. Forum members ...

See: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/blog/index.blog/1455260/royal-russia-annual-welcomes-margarita-nelipa-as-resident-writer/

"Royal Russia is pleased to announce that Russian historian and author, Margarita Nelipa has agreed to share her professional insights on the Romanovs and Imperial Russia as resident writer for our official magazine, Royal Russia Annual*. Her academic, exemplary research and writing skills will be welcomed by readers of Royal Russia Annual.

Her debut article, Servant to Three Emperors: Count Vladimir Frederiks will be published in the Royal Russia Annual No. 7 issue in January 2015. Count Frederiks** was a statesman who served as the Minister of the Imperial Court between 1897 and 1917 under Nikolai II. He is seen in countless photographs walking with the last emperor, whom he served faithfully. He was praised in this role by the French ambassador, Maurice Paléologue, who called him 'the very personification of court life'. Other than minor mentions in a few memoirs, little is known of this man and his loyal service to the last monarch and to Russia. For the first time, Margarita Nelipa offers readers the first comprehensive study of this honourable gentleman of the Imperial Court.

Margarita is of Russian heritage, her parents who arrived in Australia in 1948 as war refugees, provided her with a passion for Russian culture. Her foremost concern is to explore the latter decades of the Russian Imperial era. Formerly a medical scientist with a post-graduate qualification in Legal Studies, she has, over a decade concentrated on researching medical, legal and historical issues related to the Russian Imperial era. Fluent in the Russian language, she has translated numerous Russian scientific papers into English and written for periodicals as well as reviewed work related to the Imperial Russian Court. She co-maintains a web page: Faces of Russia: Past and Present and is a member of the American based S.E.A.R.C.H. Foundation (whose President and Founder assisted in finding the remains of the Imperial Family in Ekaterinburg).

Margarita relies on Russian primary sources for her research. These include diaries, letters, courtroom documents as well as memoirs and newspapers of the day all translated by the author and which have never been previously brought together. Her work is enhanced by extensive annotations, appendices and bibliographies.

“I enjoy the research work immensely and more so when I strike gold and am able to challenge long held myths with documented facts,” she said. “There is much to be done now that Russia is opening up their archives and is publishing more diaries etc. including serious academic tomes that apply to the imperial era. I am fortunate to have considerable resources and probably the only person in the West who writes about Russian imperial history as if I am a Russian eyewitness and can furthermore employ relevant self-translated Russian material.”

Margarita Nelipa is the author of two books: The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin A Conspiracy That Brought Down the Russian Empire (2010), Alexander III: His Life and Reign (2014). She is currently working on her third book, Alexei: Russia’s Last Imperial Heir, A Chronicle of Tragedy. This will be the first comprehensive biography in English on the only son of Nikolai II, and Heir to the Russian throne. This book is due to be published in early 2015."


Margarita Nelipa





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Offline rudy3

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Count Fréedéricksz
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2014, 03:02:25 AM »
Adolf Andreas Woldemar Fréedéricksz, general, baron, Russian count, was a Finnish citizen.
On documents and  letters that were not in Russian, he signed his name W. Fréedéricksz.
This is how his name is written on his grave, this is how his name is registered in the House of Nobility.
And this is how his daughters wrote their names.

Therefore it is a shame to see Margarita Nelipa, whose ”academic, exemplary research and writing skills” are praised above, chooses to write his name as ”Frederiks”.


Offline Belochka

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2014, 03:35:19 AM »
In response to Rudy3's post, I would like to say that I have stated in my article that the ancestral surname was indeed 'Fréedéricksz' but feel that it is more appropriate to use the surname that Frederiks himself used in Russia as shown by his signature and on all official government documents.

Furthermore I have stated in my article that after the Count died in Finland, the family grave uses the ancestral surname.

Margarita Nelipa


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Offline rudy3

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2014, 03:39:22 AM »
"The surname that Frederiks himself used in Russia" for sure should be "The surname that Frederiks himself used in Russian", as also during his life in Russia he signed Fréedéricksz. I am sure he knew how to write his own name, as we all do, don't we?

Offline Belochka

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #4 on: July 10, 2014, 03:48:38 AM »
With respect, I have photographic proof that Фредерикс (Frederiks) was the surname he used in Russia. This evidence will appear in my forthcoming article.


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Offline TimM

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2014, 04:18:54 AM »
Quote
I want to share my latest exciting news with A. P. Forum members ...

See: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/ImperialRussian/blog/index.blog/1455260/royal-russia-annual-welcomes-margarita-nelipa-as-resident-writer/

"Royal Russia is pleased to announce that Russian historian and author, Margarita Nelipa has agreed to share her professional insights on the Romanovs and Imperial Russia as resident writer for our official magazine, Royal Russia Annual*. Her academic, exemplary research and writing skills will be welcomed by readers of Royal Russia Annual.

Her debut article, Servant to Three Emperors: Count Vladimir Frederiks will be published in the Royal Russia Annual No. 7 issue in January 2015. Count Frederiks** was a statesman who served as the Minister of the Imperial Court between 1897 and 1917 under Nikolai II. He is seen in countless photographs walking with the last emperor, whom he served faithfully. He was praised in this role by the French ambassador, Maurice Paléologue, who called him 'the very personification of court life'. Other than minor mentions in a few memoirs, little is known of this man and his loyal service to the last monarch and to Russia. For the first time, Margarita Nelipa offers readers the first comprehensive study of this honourable gentleman of the Imperial Court.

Margarita is of Russian heritage, her parents who arrived in Australia in 1948 as war refugees, provided her with a passion for Russian culture. Her foremost concern is to explore the latter decades of the Russian Imperial era. Formerly a medical scientist with a post-graduate qualification in Legal Studies, she has, over a decade concentrated on researching medical, legal and historical issues related to the Russian Imperial era. Fluent in the Russian language, she has translated numerous Russian scientific papers into English and written for periodicals as well as reviewed work related to the Imperial Russian Court. She co-maintains a web page: Faces of Russia: Past and Present and is a member of the American based S.E.A.R.C.H. Foundation (whose President and Founder assisted in finding the remains of the Imperial Family in Ekaterinburg).

Margarita relies on Russian primary sources for her research. These include diaries, letters, courtroom documents as well as memoirs and newspapers of the day all translated by the author and which have never been previously brought together. Her work is enhanced by extensive annotations, appendices and bibliographies.

“I enjoy the research work immensely and more so when I strike gold and am able to challenge long held myths with documented facts,” she said. “There is much to be done now that Russia is opening up their archives and is publishing more diaries etc. including serious academic tomes that apply to the imperial era. I am fortunate to have considerable resources and probably the only person in the West who writes about Russian imperial history as if I am a Russian eyewitness and can furthermore employ relevant self-translated Russian material.”

Margarita Nelipa is the author of two books: The Murder of Grigorii Rasputin A Conspiracy That Brought Down the Russian Empire (2010), Alexander III: His Life and Reign (2014). She is currently working on her third book, Alexei: Russia’s Last Imperial Heir, A Chronicle of Tragedy. This will be the first comprehensive biography in English on the only son of Nikolai II, and Heir to the Russian throne. This book is due to be published in early 2015."

Margarita Nelipa

Hey, congratulations!
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Offline Belochka

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2014, 04:31:51 AM »
Hey, congratulations!

Thank you very much TimM! I feel incredibly excited with this new venture that I now undertaking with Paul Gilbert.

I hope that I will be able to introduce many different Russian personalities who made an impact in imperial Russia.

Kind regards,

Margarita


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Offline Dru

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2014, 07:56:12 PM »
Congratulations, Belochka!  I look forward to reading your work in Royal Russia, and of course your new biography of Alexander III :)

Offline Belochka

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2014, 08:59:51 PM »
Congratulations, Belochka!  I look forward to reading your work in Royal Russia, and of course your new biography of Alexander III :)

Thank you for your kind words Dru!

I appreciate the fact that you are interested in my work.

Best regards,

Margarita Nelipa


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Offline Belochka

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2015, 06:22:20 PM »
Confirming that my article "Servant to Three Emperors: Count Vladimir Borisovich Frederiks" has just been published in Paul Gilbert's journal ROYAL RUSSIA ANNUAL, No. 7, Winter 2015

This is the synopsis to the article -


"- a prominent figure in the public life of pre-revolutionary Russia, his career spanned over six decades. He outlived three Emperors and was witness to several remarkable events, including the abdication of Nicholas II in 1917. At the peak of his career Frederiks served as Minister of the Imperial Court and Appanages as well as Chancellor of the Russian and Imperial Orders and the Commander of the Imperial Apartments. Widely recognized by his white drooping moustache, he is often seen in photographs shadowing Emperor Nicholas II, however, for the most part few today have any idea as to who Count Vladimir Borisovich Frederiks was and what role he had played as the key Minister in the last imperial Court."

Should you wish to purchase a copy of this journal, further details are available here: http://www.angelfire.com/pa/imperialrussian/royalrussia/2015a.html


« Last Edit: February 13, 2015, 06:25:16 PM by Belochka »


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Offline rudy3

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #10 on: February 24, 2015, 06:28:50 AM »
In an article, dedicated to baron Fréedéricksz, you would at least expect, that the date of his death is mentioned correctly. Margarita Nelipa writes, that he died on July 5th, 1927. He died July 1st, 1927.

Offline Belochka

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #11 on: February 24, 2015, 07:02:21 PM »
In the book titled: "Politicheskiye deyateli Rossii 1917 Biograficheskii slovar'". [Principal editor P. V. Volobyev], Moscow, 1993 @ p 331 it states:

"Фредерикс Владимир Борисович (16 нояб. 1838 - 5 июля 1927)."
Frederiks Vladimir Borisovich (16 Nov. 1838 - 5 July 1927).

The same details appear @ p 375  in: "Svita Rossiiskikh Imperatorov", V. Fedorchenko, [Volume 2], ACT, Moscow, 2004

Kindly note that Vladimir Frederiks was a "Count", not a baron.

« Last Edit: February 24, 2015, 07:04:09 PM by Belochka »


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Offline rudy3

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #12 on: February 25, 2015, 02:13:44 AM »
Count Fréedéricksz died on July 1st 1927. You used the wrong sources for your conclusion. Finnish newspaper informed about his death on July 3rd 1927. But in your article are many more mistakes, for example this one: "After Nikolai II appointed Vladimir Borisovich the Minister of the Imperial Court on April 5 1889 ... " Wrong date, besides in 1889 Alexander III was still Tsar.

Also Fréedéricksz arrived in Finland in 1925, not 1921.
You write: "However, there is one more component, which conceivably provides the most poignant conclusion to Count Vladimir Frederiks' life story.  Even though Vladimir Voyeikov's name appears on the left hand side of the gravestone as 'Wladimir Woyeikov', Vladimir Frederiks' surname was etched on the front using the Swedish surname 'Freedericksz', thereby informing those who cared to visit the gravesite that in death the Russian Count was acknowledged as having Swedish ancestry."
I am one, "who care to visit the gravesite", often so. Vladimir Voyeikov's name is on the right hand side of the gravestone. On the left hand site is Eugenie Woyeikow's name.
On the front side Count Fréedéricksz name is just as it is registered in the House of Nobility. He was a Finn all his life, and that was the way his Finnish name was written. On his gravestone nor he, nor his daughters had to acknowledge that the Count in death had Swedish ancestry. A most poignant conclusion.
And yes, the gravestone has July 1st 1927 as date of death....

About the period 1866-1870 you write: There are no details found that reveal the reason for the lengthy absence from active duty." That means, you did not find them. He was in Paris, where both his daughters were born, Eugene in 1867, Emma in 1869.  
« Last Edit: February 25, 2015, 02:34:47 AM by rudy3 »

Offline Превед

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Re: Royal Russia - the magazine
« Reply #13 on: February 25, 2015, 04:03:04 PM »
You write: "However, there is one more component, which conceivably provides the most poignant conclusion to Count Vladimir Frederiks' life story.  Even though Vladimir Voyeikov's name appears on the left hand side of the gravestone as 'Wladimir Woyeikov', Vladimir Frederiks' surname was etched on the front using the Swedish surname 'Freedericksz', thereby informing those who cared to visit the gravesite that in death the Russian Count was acknowledged as having Swedish ancestry."
I am one, "who care to visit the gravesite", often so. Vladimir Voyeikov's name is on the right hand side of the gravestone. On the left hand site is Eugenie Woyeikow's name.
On the front side Count Fréedéricksz name is just as it is registered in the House of Nobility. He was a Finn all his life, and that was the way his Finnish name was written. On his gravestone nor he, nor his daughters had to acknowledge that the Count in death had Swedish ancestry. A most poignant conclusion.

It seems that Count Freedericksz had very little to no Swedish ancestry, if one believes that his ancestor, the merchant in Arkhangelsk known in Russian as Yury was a Dutch (or Low German) Joris Freedericksz(oon) and not a Swede (Göran Fredriksson) who changed his name to Dutch spelling. Freedericksz's mother was a Baltic German (von Wulff), his maternal grandmother was a Меллер-Закомельская / Möller-Sakomelski, an originally German family, and his his paternal great grandmother was born Christineck, probably some sort of German.

Did anyone in the Freedericksz family even speak Swedish?
« Last Edit: February 25, 2015, 04:13:37 PM by Превед »
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