Author Topic: Non-Orthodox Religious Buildings in Russia  (Read 6134 times)

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Offline Anna Francisevna

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Non-Orthodox Religious Buildings in Russia
« on: September 24, 2014, 07:44:34 PM »
Hi!  Even though I find Russian Orthodox churches very beautiful; I'm very curious about the non-Russian Orthodox religious buildings in Russia that were built during imperial Russia and are still standing today.  Specifically, in Saint Petersburg, but they can be in other locations as well.  (I'm mostly interested in Anglican and Roman Catholic churches along with Buddhist temples.)  Jewish synagouges (sp?) and Muslim mosques are welcome as well!  On wikipedia I just got a few Anglican and Roman Catholic churches located in Moscow, not the Saint Petersburg area.  I didn't know where to put this question, so feel free to move this question to its appropriate place.   :-[ 

Offline Превед

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Re: Non-Orthodox Religious Buildings in Russia
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2014, 08:36:10 PM »
Hi!  Even though I find Russian Orthodox churches very beautiful; I'm very curious about the non-Russian Orthodox religious buildings in Russia that were built during imperial Russia and are still standing today.  Specifically, in Saint Petersburg, but they can be in other locations as well.  (I'm mostly interested in Anglican and Roman Catholic churches along with Buddhist temples.)  Jewish synagouges (sp?) and Muslim mosques are welcome as well!  On wikipedia I just got a few Anglican and Roman Catholic churches located in Moscow, not the Saint Petersburg area.  I didn't know where to put this question, so feel free to move this question to its appropriate place.   :-[  

The formerly Swedish area around St. Petersburg (Ingermanland / Ingria) was originally inhabited by Protestant Finnish-speakers, who had their own Lutheran churches, organized in the following parishes:



Tsarskoe Selo (Ingrian: Saari) was located in Venjoki parish and here are some pics of Venjoki's Lutheran church: http://www.inkeri.com/Virtuaali/Venjoki/Venjoki.htm Today sadly a ruin: http://www.inkeri.com/Virtuaali/Venjoki/Nykyaika.htm

The largest and most well-known Protestant church in St. Petersburg was the Protestant German St. Peter's Church, followed by the Finnish, Swedish and Catholic churches. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutheran_Church_of_Saint_Peter_and_Saint_Paul and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lutheran_Church_of_Saint_Peter_and_Saint_Paul#In_its_neighborhood

BTW areas of the Russian Empire with non-Orthodox populations and religious buildings were those which had not been part of Russia since the Middle Ages, i.e. Karelia, Ingria, the Baltic Provinces, the former Grand Duchy of Lithuania / the Kingdom of Poland / the Pale of Settlement / Ukraina / Kazan Province, Crimea / the Far East.
« Last Edit: September 24, 2014, 09:02:10 PM by Превед »
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(Афанасий Фет: Ивы и берёзы, 1843 / 1856)

Offline Anna Francisevna

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Re: Non-Orthodox Religious Buildings in Russia
« Reply #2 on: September 24, 2014, 09:43:01 PM »
It's a shame that the old Protestant church is in ruins.  :(  It looked quite charming in the black and white photo.  The Lutheran church of Saints Peter and Paul looks beautiful!