Author Topic: Russian samovar from Tula  (Read 52927 times)

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Offline fuzzybee

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Russian samovar from Tula
« on: June 26, 2015, 06:35:21 PM »
This samovar (see pics) has been in my family for a few decades. Our neighbor in the late 70's was an importer who bought a large lot from Iran right before the revolution. After about a year of radio silence, she was getting ready to write off a huge loss, the cargo container showed up with no heads up. My family spent three days helping her family unload, and she gave my parents this samovar. We always assumed it Iranian or Middle-Eastern, but my research recently indicates it was from the Tula Arms Plant. There are two hallmarks. One is on the lid to the hot water compartment and (while faint) appears to be the eagle from 1825-1830. The hallmark on the base is what makes me believe it is from Tula and maybe a lot later, but I can't really figure this out. Anyone who could shed light on the origins of this samovar would be greatly appreciated.

Offline Sanochka

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Re: Russian samovar from Tula
« Reply #1 on: June 26, 2015, 09:35:17 PM »
I don't know how it is nowadays, but prior to the revolution, Russian samovars were manufactured primarily in Tula.  They were made by hand, with each firm producing approximately 25-30 samovars a day.  There was a large concentration of samovar makers there, among whom was N. I. Goltyakova, the maker of your samovar. 

The imperial eagle is simply a warrant, much like warrants granted by the British monarch to firms producing everything from tea to tires.  These generally signify a commercial relationship between the manufacturer and the court, and may be stamped on products for as long as the firm supplies the court and remains in good standing.  (The British counterpart to the imperial eagle is, currently, "By Appointment to Her Majesty the Queen" and the queen's coat of arms.)

The round medallions are generally awards won by the firm at trade shows and expositions.   

Judging from the photo you posted, your samovar was probably made in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, and is in great condition.

Offline fuzzybee

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Re: Russian samovar from Tula
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2015, 04:01:56 AM »
Thank you Sanochka!

The more information I have, the better.

Offline fuzzybee

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Re: Russian samovar from Tula
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2015, 07:41:36 PM »
Does anyone read Russian? Can you translate anything other than the name of the artisan who created this? Thanks!