Author Topic: Help Translating a Russian School Report  (Read 11005 times)

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Offline BingandNelsonFan

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Re: Help Translating a Russian School Report
« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2016, 06:23:22 PM »
Wow! Thank you SO much for this fabulous info. There have been several mistakes in the "Dictionary of American Biography" article, so it's not surprising that this was a bit confused. What a great piece of detection on your part to find it. Thank you!

Absolutely brilliant about the signature, too. You are so right! I am going to have to do some more looking in the morning on all of this. It would be so interesting to see when L.N. Zhuk died. Family story says that he was killed in the Revolution, so that may be true. He certainly didn't go to Zagreb with his son.

Do you know if the Ukrainian National Army would have drafted men in 1917? I'm wondering if this document was necessary to the Army (things like this were necessary to enter the British and Indian Armies). I don't know whether Anton was drafted or enlisted.

Thanks again!

Offline Превед

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Re: Help Translating a Russian School Report
« Reply #16 on: April 29, 2016, 07:59:00 AM »
You are welcome. It was a fun search. I hope you find out more, including how and where the elusive L. N. Zhuk  died.

Quote
Do you know if the Ukrainian National Army would have drafted men in 1917? I'm wondering if this document was necessary to the Army (things like this were necessary to enter the British and Indian Armies). I don't know whether Anton was drafted or enlisted.

This I know nothing about. Except that in some circumstances a high school diploma like the one you have posted was necessary for going into the army and directly train as a non-commissioned officer. But I'm sure the resident Russian military expert Mike will know much more!
Березы севера мне милы,
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: Ивы и березы, 1843 / 1856)

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Help Translating a Russian School Report
« Reply #17 on: April 29, 2016, 08:06:02 AM »
This is very interesting.

I assume that the School marked students on the basis of 1-5 in each subject and 3 was the pass mark.

Ann

Offline Превед

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Re: Help Translating a Russian School Report
« Reply #18 on: April 29, 2016, 02:08:33 PM »
I assume that the School marked students on the basis of 1-5 in each subject and 3 was the pass mark.

The Russian Wikipedia article on school grades says:

Традиция обозначать цифрами прилежание и успехи учеников утвердилась в России ещё в начале XIX века. Тогда в гимназиях употреблялись цифры от 0 до 5. Нуль показывал, что ученик совсем не исполнил своих обязанностей; если он получал два нуля подряд, то он подвергался телесному наказанию (до 1864 г.)[1] Единицу и двойку ставили тогда, когда ученик неудовлетворительно приготовил урок; тройку ставили за посредственное прилежание; четыре когда ученик хорошо исполнил свои обязанности; пять он получал только за отличное знание урока. Учитель был обязан ставить баллы в классе, характеризуя только знание заданного на дом урока, и не имел права учитывать внимание или рассеянность учеников во время занятия, а также временное или постоянное прилежание ученика, его возраст и способности[2].

Несмотря на многочисленные попытки реформирования этой системы, из которых наиболее значительная была предпринята при Луначарском[3], эта система сохранилась и в СССР.

=

"Traditionally the numerals denoting the diligence and success of students were established in Russia in the early XIX century . Then, in the gymnasiums were used numbers from 0 to 5. Zero showed that the student had not fulfilled their obligations; If he gets two zeros in a row, he was subjected to corporal punishment (up to 1864), one and two were given when the student had prepared a lesson unsatisfactory; three indicated mediocre diligence; four - when the student has well performed his duties; five he received only when displaying excellent knowledge of the lesson. The teacher was obliged to give the points in class, describing only the knowledge of a given home lesson, and had no right to take into account the attention or distraction of students during classes, as well as temporary or permanent diligence student's age and ability.

Despite numerous attempts to reform the system, of which the most significant was made ​​by Lunacharsky, the system continued in the Soviet Union."

The article has a link to the concept Двоечник - 2er / dunce, who had to retake a year before passing, so it fits with Ann's assessment of 3 being the passing grade. (From a modern Norwegian viewpoint, with six pasing grades, I must say that just three passing grades was rather limited, probably an indication not only of the strict and high standards of the day, but also of the narrow gauge of assessment, i.e. there was a limited syllabus and things were either right or wrong.)
« Last Edit: April 29, 2016, 02:20:35 PM by Превед »
Березы севера мне милы,
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: Ивы и березы, 1843 / 1856)

Offline BingandNelsonFan

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Re: Help Translating a Russian School Report
« Reply #19 on: May 06, 2016, 03:28:14 PM »
You are welcome. It was a fun search. I hope you find out more, including how and where the elusive L. N. Zhuk  died.

Quote
Do you know if the Ukrainian National Army would have drafted men in 1917? I'm wondering if this document was necessary to the Army (things like this were necessary to enter the British and Indian Armies). I don't know whether Anton was drafted or enlisted.

This I know nothing about. Except that in some circumstances a high school diploma like the one you have posted was necessary for going into the army and directly train as a non-commissioned officer. But I'm sure the resident Russian military expert Mike will know much more!

Thanks a lot! I am going to keep working on this, and I'll be sure to post any updates that I find along the way.