Author Topic: Alexander III's villa in Fredensborg/ Denmark  (Read 874 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Henrik Christensen

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Alexander III's villa in Fredensborg/ Denmark
« on: April 03, 2016, 03:48:49 AM »
Oct. 20th. 1885 tzar Alexander announced buying a villa on the hillside in Fredensborg.
In 1888 a local carpenter called Peder Pedersen started the comprehensive and essential restoration and rebuild of the house finishing oct. 3rd 1888 including new floors, doors, windows, fence, roof, chimneys, woodcarvings, interior and more. We have found detailed listings of everything regarding the renovation and decorating of the villa.
On oct. 1st 1889 Alexander and Dagmar inaugurated the villa with a small event serving tea to the guests. The guests including their son, future tzar of Russia,  Nicolai, future king of England, Duke George of Wales and future Queen of Norway, Duchess Maud of Wales. The three of them went into the wintergarden of the house and carved their names in the same glass, carving: Nicky, Georgie and Harry (Mauds nickname)
The house was depicted in the Fabérgeegg called: The danish palaces egg - today displayed at MoMA in N.Y.

You can see detailed pictures of the house at the website: www.kejserensvilla.com

Offline Henrik Christensen

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 4
    • View Profile
Re: Alexander III's villa in Fredensborg/ Denmark
« Reply #1 on: April 03, 2016, 03:56:20 AM »
In the garden, 15 meters from the house there is a tree about 150 years old it is about 30-40 meters tall.
It has been made as one tree dividing into 6 trees. A guest from Russia seeing the tree said: It represented Dagmar and Alexanders kids.
I have talked to the royal gardener working at the Queens palace next-door. He says, that the theory is plausible, because the technique used to split the tree into several trees was made about the time the bought the villa in 1885.

My question in this forum:
Have anyone come across mentioning of a familytree in Denmark in imperial diaries or notes? One tree splitting into 6.