Author Topic: Aerials of the Winter Palace - Hermitage  (Read 3211 times)

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Offline Cathy

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Re: Aerials of the Winter Palace - Hermitage
« Reply #15 on: June 22, 2017, 06:26:14 AM »
Thank you for this amazing picture - I can easily identify the items you list in the blog.

Offline Joanna

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Re: Aerials of the Winter Palace - Hermitage
« Reply #16 on: June 28, 2017, 01:25:42 PM »
Aerial View of the Winter Palace in Saint Petersburg c1924

http://winterpalaceresearch.blogspot.ca/2017/06/aerial-view-of-winter-palace-c1924.html

Joanna

Offline Sanochka

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Re: Aerials of the Winter Palace - Hermitage
« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2017, 09:07:25 AM »
What a fascinating pair of before & after pictures.  Both are taken from the same angle and are so clear that I could spend all day comparing the two.  It's amazing how little has changed.  Thank you for posting, Joanna.

Offline Inok Nikolai

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Re: Aerials of the Winter Palace - Hermitage
« Reply #18 on: July 02, 2017, 04:37:37 PM »
Brings back fond memories!

In the first picture, the dark, six-story building (at the upper right, at the end of the far bridge) used to be the dormitory for foreign students.
(Now it's been replaced by a fancy new apartment building.)

In the 1970s our room faced the Neva, directly across from the Winter Palace. The Fortress of SS. Peter and Paul was on our left, Palace Embankment was in the center, and the Admiralty, St. Isaacs, and the Point of Vasilevsky Island were on the right.
One could spend hours admiring the view, especially at night when the buildings were all lit up until 1 AM.
A magical time...
On one particular evening, a full moon rose directly overhead from behind the Winter Palace, bathing it and the river in moonlight.

To get to classes, we we used to cross over the far bridge, cut behind the former Stock Exchange, walk along the the Twelve Colleges and enter the university next door to it.
Of course, in winter, and with a strong wind blowing, it could be a bit of a challenge!
инок Николай

Offline Cathy

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Re: Aerials of the Winter Palace - Hermitage
« Reply #19 on: July 04, 2017, 07:03:46 AM »
инок Николай - I love your story. It puts a lovely human touch to the picture and to the area of the Twelve Colleges. I love these buildings.

Here is a little background information:

"...The largest structure in St. Petersburg surviving from the Petrine era, the Twelve Colleges were at the centre of Peter the Great's fundamental reforms of the Russian state in the 18th century. In the 19th century, as the main campus of St. Petersburg University, the building became the site of historic research and discoveries by Russian academics including Dmitry Mendeleev, Alexander Popov, and Ivan Pavlov.

The building, which is over 400 meters long, was commissioned by Peter in 1718 to house the new structures of government - the Senate, the Synod of the Russian Orthodox Church, and the nine Colleges, which served the function of modern ministries. The original architect of the project was Domenico Trezzini, who had also designed the Peter and Paul Fortress, and building began 1722. It took 20 years to complete the building, during which time construction was supervised by Theodor Schwertfeger, Mikhail Zemtsov, and Domenico Trezzini's nephew (and son-in-law) Giuseppe Trezzini.

Originally twelve separate buildings, with trading premises on the first floors and the offices of government above, the structure was unusual for St. Petersburg in that its main facade faced away from the Neva River, forming one side of what Peter the Great planned to be the central square of his new city. As the 18th century progressed and the centre of the city gradually became established on the left bank of the river, with no permanent bridge connecting to Vasilevskiy Island, the site of the Twelve Colleges became increasingly inconvenient, part of the reason why the higher departments of government began to seek new premises on the opposite bank.

In 1804, part of the Twelve Colleges was assigned to the Pedagogical Institute, the precursor of St. Petersburg University, which was officially founded in 1819. At that time, the building was significantly altered to suit its new role. Of the original interiors, only the sculptures, frieze, ceiling murals and fireplaces in the Petrovsky Hall have survived. Of note from the early 19th century reconstruction are the grand staircase and the magnificent Assembly Hall.
 
To this day, the Twelve Colleges house the university's administrative offices, as well as the Faculties of Geology and Earth Sciences. Widely considered the second best university in Russia after Moscow State, St. Petersburg State counts amongst its alumni eight Nobel Prize winners, including Ivan Pavlov and the poet Joseph Brodsky and the Russian-American novelist and philosopher Ayn Rand.
Visitors have access to some of the public halls of the Twelve Colleges, which also regularly host concerts, and the building also houses two museums - the Museum of the History of St. Petersburg University and the Dmitry Mendeleev Apartment Museum.

Dmitry Mendeleev's Memorial Museum Apartment is a museum apartment of the Russian chemist Dmitry Mendeleev, who is famous for establishing the Periodic law of arranging chemical elements by their atomic masses, which allowed the prediction of properties of elements (i.e. simple substances) yet to be discovered.
It is located in the Twelve Colleges building, now being the centre of Saint Petersburg State University and in Mendeleev's time - Head Pedagogical Institute with his archives. The street in front of these is named after him as Mendeleevskaya liniya (Mendeleev Line). For security reasons access into the building in general is allowed mostly to authorized persons, such as students and staff of the University. All entrants are to present to the guards their identification documents...".

My sister and I have visited Vasilevskiy Island 3 times - the last time we walked by the Mendeleev museum, knocked at the door and were given the most amazing tour of the apartment. The curator took us around explaining every 'element' of M.'s living space. It was of course in Russian which we are not adept at but we understood enough to appreciate everything we saw and were  told. We then had the opportunity to explore on our own. What a great experience.

Cathy

Offline Joanna

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Re: Aerials of the Winter Palace - Hermitage
« Reply #20 on: July 30, 2017, 08:17:37 PM »
A beautiful painting of the Winter Palace from Palace Square in 1898 (note the color of the fašade by the artist)

http://winterpalaceresearch.blogspot.ca/2017/07/winter-palace-from-palace-square-in-1898.html
   
Joanna