Author Topic: 100 Years Later  (Read 1678 times)

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Offline Ellie

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100 Years Later
« on: March 16, 2017, 06:34:07 AM »
 Marking 100 years since the abdication of the Czar, I can't help but wonder if any progress towards achieving a political entity of law and order and civil liberties has been made. It's been over a quarter of a century since the fall of the USSR. Some folks say that Putin is an improvement over his predecessors. To me he seems like a continuation of Russian autocracy. Perhaps more lenient than his Soviet predecessors, but I don't see any real progress towards establishing progressive civil institutions.
A few days ago I received a link to an article describing a school for monarchists in Russia where it was stated the monarchy is Russia's fate and it might be a good idea to crown Putin as Czar  Vladamir.
I find this all very depressing. Is there not any hope for Russia to make meaningful progress from autocracy, or is autocracy Russia's fate?

Offline TimM

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2017, 10:41:06 AM »
Russia has dabbled with democracy from time to time, but never really managed to make it work.  Putin seems to want democracy only on his terms, he'll go so far, but no farther.  Still, Russia has had leaders much worse (Joseph Stalin, come on down).

Putin may be a de facto Tsar, but even he won't live forever.  After him, who knows what may happen.  Russia could get someone far worse, but, on the other hand, they could get someone better. 

Offline JamesAPrattIII

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #2 on: March 17, 2017, 04:49:05 PM »
Putin as tsar the title General secretary would be better for this ex-Chekist thug who is also a dictator on the march. Where he goes next no one knows. Some people who have met him find him to be a cold eyed killer. Based on his background this is not surprising. Putin is also getting old and people have pointed out Russia could be entering a Brezhnev like period of stagnation and corruption. There is no way Putin is going to step down voluntarily he has too many enemies. So it could be one day the Russians might get fed up with him and there might be another revolution that gets rid of him.

Offline TimM

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2017, 05:23:11 PM »

Offline Ellie

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2017, 11:07:43 PM »
TimM, that is a very encouraging piece of news. Despite going against the, so to speak, law, the young folks are demonstrating against corruption and against foreign adventures - namely, Syria.

This is the internet age and people now are not going to keep quiet. At least Russia isn't North Korea where the internet is blocked.

Thanks for the pointer TimM.

Offline Ellie

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2017, 01:24:52 AM »
I was just thinking that we're now celebrating 100 years since the February revolution (as distinct from the disaster that followed it in October/November of that year).
Wouldn't it be great if we could now have a meaningful follow up to that revolution not being hijacked by that Ulyanov boy driving into Finland station - courtesy of the Kaiser?

Offline edubs31

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2017, 10:42:37 AM »
It would certainly have been interesting to see what the future of Russia might have been had the Provisional Government held onto power...or had the Whites won the Civil War that followed.

It seems unlikely to me that the unrest could have been quelled so long as Russia remained in the war, and Kerensky and company we're dedicated to supporting the allied cause. Therefore it seems likely to me that legitimate leadership could never have been established unless a bloody revolution had placed them at the head of government...such as it did for Lenin and, ultimately, Stalin.

Given the constant state of confusion and identity crisis Russia has suffered from over the decades - be it as a Monarchy, a Communist state, a quasi-Democratic republic, or whatever the hell we consider it to be under Tsar Putin at present - I'm betting revolution and upheaval was, sadly, Russia's destiny...it was just a matter of when.
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline JamesAPrattIII

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2017, 05:23:36 PM »
I said before in a above post the Russians might get fed up with Putin one day and it looks like many of them are. Who knows they might have a revolution.

Offline TimM

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2017, 07:01:53 AM »
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the Russians might get fed up with Putin one day and it looks like many of them are. Who knows they might have a revolution.

Ironic if this were to happen this year, the 100th Anniversary of the last revolution.

Hope things turn out better this time.

Offline edubs31

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2017, 11:22:28 AM »
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the Russians might get fed up with Putin one day and it looks like many of them are. Who knows they might have a revolution.

Ironic if this were to happen this year, the 100th Anniversary of the last revolution.

Hope things turn out better this time.

Don't hold your breath gentlemen. Are there any true warning signs to suggest a coup is possible or about to happen here?

Russians didn't revolt and overthrow the government during the nearly 70-year reign of the Soviet Union...despite the horrid conditions many of them were living in. Why would they be anymore likely to do with Putin in control?

Fear, intimidation and confusion (and dare I say "Fake News") are very powerful tools, especially when the one in question has plenty of supporters and has developed quite a cult of personality.
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline TimM

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2017, 07:02:41 AM »
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Russians didn't revolt and overthrow the government during the nearly 70-year reign of the Soviet Union...despite the horrid conditions many of them were living in. Why would they be anymore likely to do with Putin in control?

Yes, but back then there was no Internet and no Social Media sites like Facebook and Twitter.  That could make a difference. Many think it was Social Media that helped the so-called Arab Spring (even if things didn't turn out well in the end). 

Something like that could happen in Russia too.

Offline JamesAPrattIII

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #11 on: April 04, 2017, 05:54:50 PM »
Early this morning 4 Apr I saw on Cspan a program by the Atlantic council on Human rights in Russia on these protests that was quite interesting.

Offline Ellie

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #12 on: April 05, 2017, 10:11:01 PM »
There are a number of things which trigger my pessimism when hearing what Russians have to say.

1. What is so important about freedom as long as we have the essentials in life?
2. Who needs to travel since I don't have enough money to do so anyway?
3. Quite a few more successful Russians as well as descendants of white emigres abroad see Putin as a godsend - their savior from communism.

Last, but not least,
4. We needed someone like Stalin in the fight against the Nazis.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2017, 10:13:42 PM by Ellie »

Offline JGP

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2017, 01:28:35 AM »
Putin as tsar the title General secretary would be better for this ex-Chekist thug who is also a dictator on the march. Where he goes next no one knows. Some people who have met him find him to be a cold eyed killer. Based on his background this is not surprising. Putin is also getting old and people have pointed out Russia could be entering a Brezhnev like period of stagnation and corruption. There is no way Putin is going to step down voluntarily he has too many enemies. So it could be one day the Russians might get fed up with him and there might be another revolution that gets rid of him.

Based on previous posts, I never thought I would ever agree with you on anything but I most certainly do here.  Kind regards, JGP

Offline TimM

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Re: 100 Years Later
« Reply #14 on: April 06, 2017, 06:34:05 AM »
Quote
Last, but not least,
4. We needed someone like Stalin in the fight against the Nazis.

Kind of like today, except replace Nazis with terrorism (in regards to what happened in St. Petersburg on Monday).