Author Topic: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic  (Read 35699 times)

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Offline JamesAPrattIII

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #90 on: January 15, 2018, 08:59:31 PM »
Comments:
White Phosphorus was around back then and does burn but I don't think anyone would recommend it for a hit like this.

Street Lights and phone booths. I don't know if they had either in Perm at this time and if they did they would not be working. In all the pictures ect of Ekaterinberg I didn't notice any. This is a country devastated by war, revolution and civil war. nothing worked

Safe house complaints: The team would have been happy to have had a roof over their heads that didn't leak when it rains, 4 walls and no furnishing except a crate or two to sit on.

Sukhorukov if he thought his life might be in danger he would have at least one bodyguard. he would not go out unless he had a few or several. he would also either sleep in a safe place or would of had his room guarded.

Offline TimM

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #91 on: January 16, 2018, 05:30:10 PM »
Did phone booths even exist back then?   The telephone was less than fifty years old at this point.
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Offline Nictionary

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #92 on: January 16, 2018, 06:04:29 PM »
The first phone booth was opened in Berlin in 1881, the first in the US in 1889, and the first in London in 1903.
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Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #93 on: January 17, 2018, 03:04:28 AM »
They had telephone boxes at the main stations in Petrograd by 1916, but they may not have spread as far as Perm by then. Also, in a time of civil war, telephone cables tend to be cut.

Telegrams were much more generally used than telephones at this time. I seem to remember reading that even in August 1914 the Kaiser's palace at Potsdam was not on the telephone! This caused problems for consulting with the Kaiser over the mobilisation and march into Belgium.

Ann

Offline TimM

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #94 on: January 17, 2018, 07:52:29 AM »
Didn't know that phone booths went back that far. 

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Offline JamesAPrattIII

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #95 on: January 17, 2018, 05:58:10 PM »
The telephone booth info can be found on wiki. In Russia I believe in the book "Russian Hussar" the author mentions he could make a call from Moscow to St Petersburg but he had to go to the telephone exchange to do it. I believe there was another account I read of a Russian officer who arrived in Kiev port the February revolution looked a friends address in the directory called them from a phone. he didn't mention if it was a pay phone or not. Post February 1917 is when things fell apart in the Russian Empire. A city like Perm would have been way behind St Petersburg.

On archive.org don't try these in real life Nic. They may give you some ideas
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Offline TimM

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #96 on: January 18, 2018, 11:16:40 AM »
Of course, telephone booths are more or less gone now, thanks to cell phones.
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Offline Nictionary

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #97 on: January 18, 2018, 12:52:59 PM »
Thanks for the info on the books, James.  And don't worry, there's not much risk of my trying it at home.  Chemistry was never my strongest subject.  It'll probably be a while before I add some more.
The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it.

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Offline Превед

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #98 on: January 19, 2018, 01:54:43 PM »
In the Soviet Union and in Russian today the main term seems to have been and be таксофон (taksofon) for the payphone itself - see Wikipedia

Tелефон-автомат (telefon-avtomat) and телефонная будка (telefonnaya budka) seems to have been other terms also in use for the more elaborate booth type.

This Russian site, which looks reliable enough, says, in addition to all the info given above about telephone booths in the US, Germany etc. that:

Первые телефонные будки в России появились в 20-х годах.
=
The first telephone booths in Russia appeared in the 1920s.

A very peculiar-looking one in Moscow in the 1920s: https://nornegest.livejournal.com/362498.html
« Last Edit: January 19, 2018, 02:13:54 PM by Превед »
Берёзы севера мне милы,—
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: «Ивы и берёзы», 1843 / 1856)

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #99 on: January 20, 2018, 02:51:32 AM »
According to one of the  books I have read on the killing of Rasputin (currently trying to remember which one), Sergei Sukhotin's role was to lay a false trail by making a telephone call from a telephone box at one of the railway station's to say that Rasputin had left the Moika and was on his way home.

Ultimately, it matters not - just work on the basis that there were no telephone boxes in Perm!

Another means of communication might be innocuous-sounding letters. For example, 'Grandma is now recovering,' might mean, 'Everything is ready for the hit.'

Regards

Ann

Offline TimM

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #100 on: January 20, 2018, 11:37:40 AM »
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Another means of communication might be innocuous-sounding letters. For example, 'Grandma is now recovering,' might mean, 'Everything is ready for the hit.'

Yeah, I've seen a lot of that in spy movies.
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Offline Превед

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #101 on: January 21, 2018, 02:45:33 PM »
Quote
Another means of communication might be innocuous-sounding letters. For example, 'Grandma is now recovering,' might mean, 'Everything is ready for the hit.'

Yeah, I've seen a lot of that in spy movies.

My favourite coded telegram is the German Reichstag representative for the Danish minority in Schleswig, Hans Peter Hanssen-Nørremølle, telegraphing the Danish government from Berlin during some crucial point in the immediate aftermath of WW1 that "the library administration says the book may be returned", in reference to the German government and South Jutland's / North Schleswig's return back to Danish rule.
Берёзы севера мне милы,—
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: «Ивы и берёзы», 1843 / 1856)

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #102 on: January 22, 2018, 05:33:44 AM »
A perfect example!

During WW2, the BBC broadcasts to the Occupied Countries included a series of short messages just before the Nine O'Clock News. These were sentences such as 'The black cat is in the garden,' and had a specific meaning for particular resistance groups.

My late father used to say that in August 1944 the BBC used to play the Chopin Polonaise in A Major every night as long as the Polish Home Army held out in Warsaw, and then one night they didn't.... He was 16 on 23 August and remembered it very well.

Ann

Offline TimM

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #103 on: January 22, 2018, 06:31:58 AM »
Quote
During WW2, the BBC broadcasts to the Occupied Countries included a series of short messages just before the Nine O'Clock News. These were sentences such as 'The black cat is in the garden,' and had a specific meaning for particular resistance groups.

I've seen movies about that.  Pretty cool how they did that.
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Offline JamesAPrattIII

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Re: Operation Rod of Iron: AU fic
« Reply #104 on: January 22, 2018, 07:19:57 PM »
The book "The Murder of Rasputin" V purishkevich states the Warsaw Station telephone booth was where a call diverting people was made.

Also note back then if you made a long distance telephone call you often had to yell for the other person to hear you

If a hotel in perm had a telephone in the room they would most likely be the best hotel in town and only in the best rooms and you most likely would have had to go through a switchboard.

I would also like to point out many rural homes in Germany did not have electricity in WW I. They had to use oil lamps and no oil in WW I means no light.

Many US farmers did not get electricity until the 1930s and 40s

A problem the Russians had in WW I is sometime their soldiers would cut down telegragh poles for firewood

In 1919 Russia candles and matches were in short supply in the red held areas.