Author Topic: Romanov story  (Read 14952 times)

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Offline infanta

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #45 on: February 06, 2018, 02:25:18 PM »
Boiling water is always recommended from what I have read in US outdoor magazines like Field & Stream, Outdoor Life and Fur Fish game. These are people who live in Alaska Canada and the northern US. One account a man fell in a clear trout stream got a mouth full of water and had a bad case of Beaver Fever as they say for 3 weeks vomiting and dysentery.

On cabins in the woods people who live in them are usually busy in the summer getting food for the winter they also chop a lot of fire wood. A small cabin for one man would probably be just one room containing a bed, a fireplace or stove, a table, and a chair. It would be stocked with food, clothes, pots, and pans.  There would be a lot of firewood outside, a garden, most likely a shed for more food and spare stuff in case the cabin catches fire which does happen in winter. There would be a least a shot gun and possibly a rifle in the cabin. I don't think Tatania would bother adjusting the shirt she would put in on as is. Olga would put one on too since the only thing it looks like she is wearing is on top is Tatania's white silk blouse. I don't think the cabin would have had more than one or two pillows. This is from reading accounts over the years in the above magazines about people who live out in the woods in the US and Canada.

I appreciate your comment. You're assuming the peasant always lived alone. He died naturally, just like it would have died any other relative that lived with him.

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #46 on: February 06, 2018, 02:35:25 PM »
I think our party would be wondering what he had died from, and whether it was something infectious.

If it had been dysentery or typhoid, then the evidence would be there, but I'm assuming that you are thinking along the lines of a heart attack or similar.

Ann

Offline infanta

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #47 on: February 06, 2018, 02:37:23 PM »
I think it's kind of silly of me not doing the following declaration before posting the very first chapter: I started to write this May last year. I currently have a 90 pages document. At its time I researched and consulted a Russian friend of mine who is very enlightened about this period and the conditions people lived in. However, the topics here are love, courage, personal growth, and one of the most important: faith. You might find here and there parts where "they have it too easy" considering where they are, and what they're going through. OTM and white officers were very religious. Of course after the disgrace they lived since their father's abdication I had to make room for God's influence and their faith in the whole story. Also you might find later on, they don't seem very affected by the loss of their family. Let me spoil you, they won't now, because they're on the constant run, fear, and their minds are occupied. This will be something that will mark them and affect them as long as they live, one way or another.

Offline infanta

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #48 on: February 06, 2018, 02:39:28 PM »
I think our party would be wondering what he had died from, and whether it was something infectious.

If it had been dysentery or typhoid, then the evidence would be there, but I'm assuming that you are thinking along the lines of a heart attack or similar.

Ann

Exactly, when I wrote I thought of a heart attack.

Offline Grandoffsky

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #49 on: February 06, 2018, 03:29:29 PM »
I just wanted to say that sometimes it is worth remembering that fiction is fiction for a reason - it gives the author more freedom of what they choose to write and in how much detail they are willing to go. While we may each have our own tastes in what we like or not, it is up to the author to decide how much information they are willing to share at each point. And threre are many different styles and voices in which one can write that don't all ask for complete historical or even practical credibility in all things. But that, of course, is just my philological opinion.

Meanwhile, infanta, good job and keep it going!

Offline infanta

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #50 on: February 06, 2018, 03:39:44 PM »
I just wanted to say that sometimes it is worth remembering that fiction is fiction for a reason - it gives the author more freedom of what they choose to write and in how much detail they are willing to go. While we may each have our own tastes in what we like or not, it is up to the author to decide how much information they are willing to share at each point. And threre are many different styles and voices in which one can write that don't all ask for complete historical or even practical credibility in all things. But that, of course, is just my philological opinion.

Meanwhile, infanta, good job and keep it going!

I agree! That's what I said not long ago. If it was a history book I was writing of course it would need every detail. I'm very glad you like it! :)

Offline infanta

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #51 on: February 06, 2018, 06:16:48 PM »
Another chapter. A surprise is about to come for Tatiana...


I was awoken by continuous soft moves; like if I was riding a horse. To my surprise, I actually was. Dmitri had me tied up to his back, and we marched while the others walked. I thanked his smart decision, because the leg still hurt.
-Where are we going?
-Chusovaya river. I hope we are closer now. It's a really beautiful place. Besides, we will go down the river until we get to the Kama. Then we will go down the Volga to get out of the country. Also I have a surprise for you once we arrive to a town.
-Really?
-Yes, really- he smiled looking back.
We rode for a few hours until we finally distinguished a shiny thing moving in between the pines. It was the Chusovaya river. Dmitri was right, it was such a beautiful place. The birds were chirping, and as drew closer, we could hear the sound of the water flow. It was very relaxing.
-Finally some decent water to drink -commented Maria.
She made a good point.
-Now we'll have to look for a good spot to sleep- suggested Ivan- this shore is too rocky to walk at night, besides- he observed the grey clouds above us- it wonít take much for it to rain.
That was what the others did, while I sat with Dmitriís help on a rock. But not much time went by, and it started pouring.
-Just what we needed- I heard Olga complaining a few meters away from me.
-If my memory doesn't fail, I think around here there's a cave in which we could stay -said Ivan, who was born and raised in the area.
-What if there's a bear inside?- asked Maria.
Dmitri covered my head with his jacket, held me in his arms, following the rest. Just like Ivan said earlier there was a cave not far. Before getting inside, the men checked for bears, but thank God, it was empty. We were drenched, and we sat next to the small fire Dmitri prepared. .
We didn't have much food left: all we had was a small piece of bread. Ivan didn't eat and gave his part to Maria; Olga only drank tea and Dmitri wanted to give me his portion
-No, you should eat too -I implied.
-Iím not wounded, you are. So eat my bread -he smiled.
-I don't want to. Eat your bread. I'll eat mine, there's no reason why I should have your part too.
-Youíre very thin, you're wounded and we still have a long and tiring trip ahead. Eat.
-Fine, only if you have one big bite.
He did as I said, and we drank tea from the same cup. After eating, the rest remained silent, looking how the fire was almost getting extinguished.
-Iím going to check if itís still raining outside- said Dmitri standing up- Would you accompany me, Tatiana?
I raised my eyebrows, and doubted whether it was a wise thing to do. But finally I gave up to his insistent stare, and assumed he wanted to discuss something.
-The past nights you have been having nightmares. Do you remember them?- he asked leaning me against the entrance of the cave.
-I donít.
-You cry and sweat. And I'm very worried. I wish so fervently to have you avoid seeing what you saw that night- he said with a sad expression in his face.
-Actually, I don't remember much. We were awoken, and they told us we were being moved to a safer location. I remember we waited in the cellar, and then it all became so confusing, the doorÖ
-Please don't, I don't want you to remember- he interrupted me- now we should only seek for the future ahead us-he kissed my hand.
It had stopped raining, and the wind was cool. In almost darkness I kept my eyes fixed on his, having doubts about bringing up a topic.
-I need to know something- I started- but promise me you will be honest with your response.
-Always.
I made a pause, to inhale air.
-Do you think Nastya is well and safe?
He sighed, and right after, I felt how he squeezed my hand.
-I donít know how it went for Alexander, our other partner. Anastasia was wounded, I donít know if it was severe...
Instinctively, I leaned my head on his shoulder as tears flowed down my cheeks. Dmitri gave me his handkerchief, as well as his arms to comfort me. Besides the disgrace, I felt safe with his company. A strong, powerful feeling gained my heart once more.
-I think itís late, and the rest are already asleep. You will feel better too once you do.
I nodded, and with his help we walked in again. There was only one piece of a thin log ignited. In silence, we arranged with a blanket the spot weíd rest on. Before dozing off, I checked my wound to make sure it wasnít infected. Thank God, the stitches looked fine. Once I sat down, I gazed at my sisters, who were resting peacefully. From the bottom of my heart I thanked that they were alright, and that we were together. I turned to the side, and Dmitri smiled to me.
-Good night- he whispered covering me with his jacket.
In response, my hand reached out for his.

Offline TimM

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #52 on: February 07, 2018, 06:37:48 AM »
A good chapter, with nice Tatiana/Dimitri scenes.
Cats: You just gotta love them!

Offline infanta

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #53 on: February 07, 2018, 09:12:40 AM »
A good chapter, with nice Tatiana/Dimitri scenes.

Thank you!

Offline JamesAPrattIII

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #54 on: February 08, 2018, 08:09:38 PM »
The Czech legion as Ann mentions did wear Russian Khaki, KUK grey and some civilian. For identification they wore a white/Red ribbon in their caps. They also had a sleeve patch. The White Siberians used a White over green patch from July 1918. The White forces in Siberia used a White over green flag. The RKKA Workers and Peasants Red Army some units had a red star in their caps worn point down in 1918. and point up afterwards. They also wore a red diagonal band in their caps for the people who could get red stars of which there were more than a few in 1918.

Russia after March 1917 became a arms and ammo depot without a government. There were plenty to go round so lets have Tatania getting shot in the leg. Olga bandages her up and the whole party grabs some stuff quickly and runs for it because there are people after them. Dmitri might want to give his rifle, haversack and bread bag to Maria so he can carry Tatania. The party goes a few versts and stops for a quick break. Ivan has the others slip into the woods while he continues on the trail for about half a verst dropping a bloody bandage then he walks backwards a few hundred meters gets off the trail and backtracks an meets up with the rest.
 A verst is about a kilometer.

The book "Woodcraft" by EH Kreps written in 1919 is on both the Guttenberg press and archive.org for those who want to know about building a log cabin, fire starting ect.

In the Russian Civil war the country was big the armies were small and there were large areas of the front that were thinly held so slipping past the reds would be no problem. In meeting the Czechs OTM spoke Russian, French and English and I believe Maria did start learning some german in 1917-18. The Czechs did know some german and learned Russian. it should be pointed  out in the Austro-Hungarian Empire something like 14 languages were spoken. Add to this in at least one regiment the main language used was English. The officers learned it in school the enlisted men learn it because they planned on emigrating to a English speaking country. After having problems trying to communicate with the Czechs in Russian or German. OTM says something in English and a Czech soldier would had lived in the US replys in New York City American English.

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #55 on: February 09, 2018, 02:53:03 AM »
James

All this sounds ideal.

Ann

Offline infanta

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #56 on: February 09, 2018, 07:38:46 AM »
The Czech legion as Ann mentions did wear Russian Khaki, KUK grey and some civilian. For identification they wore a white/Red ribbon in their caps. They also had a sleeve patch. The White Siberians used a White over green patch from July 1918. The White forces in Siberia used a White over green flag. The RKKA Workers and Peasants Red Army some units had a red star in their caps worn point down in 1918. and point up afterwards. They also wore a red diagonal band in their caps for the people who could get red stars of which there were more than a few in 1918.

Russia after March 1917 became a arms and ammo depot without a government. There were plenty to go round so lets have Tatania getting shot in the leg. Olga bandages her up and the whole party grabs some stuff quickly and runs for it because there are people after them. Dmitri might want to give his rifle, haversack and bread bag to Maria so he can carry Tatania. The party goes a few versts and stops for a quick break. Ivan has the others slip into the woods while he continues on the trail for about half a verst dropping a bloody bandage then he walks backwards a few hundred meters gets off the trail and backtracks an meets up with the rest.
 A verst is about a kilometer.

The book "Woodcraft" by EH Kreps written in 1919 is on both the Guttenberg press and archive.org for those who want to know about building a log cabin, fire starting ect.

In the Russian Civil war the country was big the armies were small and there were large areas of the front that were thinly held so slipping past the reds would be no problem. In meeting the Czechs OTM spoke Russian, French and English and I believe Maria did start learning some german in 1917-18. The Czechs did know some german and learned Russian. it should be pointed  out in the Austro-Hungarian Empire something like 14 languages were spoken. Add to this in at least one regiment the main language used was English. The officers learned it in school the enlisted men learn it because they planned on emigrating to a English speaking country. After having problems trying to communicate with the Czechs in Russian or German. OTM says something in English and a Czech soldier would had lived in the US replys in New York City American English.

All this sounds very nice, but I already wrote this part last year. I don't understand why you're saying "In meeting the Czechs, OTM (...)". What makes you think they'll meet the Czechs? Also, what makes you think Dmitri and Ivan are fully equipped. You don't know yet how they managed to rescue them being outnumbered by the Bolsheviks in the Ipatiev house. It's funny also how you say "let's have Tatiana getting shot in the leg and Olga bandages her up", you're talking like if you could control what I write, as if you were doing a dictation and I was the one copying. Let it be clear I value feedback, but I think this way you have of expressing it it's... Strange.

Offline JamesAPrattIII

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #57 on: February 09, 2018, 05:14:24 PM »
Sorry for being a historical pain :( infant.a The Czech legion was the best fighting force on the White side at this time in Siberia. there were a lot White Russians with them when they captured Ekaterinburg who sometimes get left out.

Offline Превед

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #58 on: February 09, 2018, 06:41:18 PM »
The book "Woodcraft" by EH Kreps written in 1919 is on both the Guttenberg press and archive.org for those who want to know about building a log cabin, fire starting ect.

100 years later we have bushcraft Youtube videos for that purpose!
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=bushcraft+log+cabin
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=bushcraft+start+a+fire

Watching someone build something from scratch with their bare hands is also quite nice for meditation :-) (Check out this guy, he is a Stone Age god: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAL3JXZSzSm8AlZyD3nQdBA)
« Last Edit: February 09, 2018, 06:44:33 PM by Превед »
Берёзы севера мне милы,ó
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: ęИвы и берёзыĽ, 1843 / 1856)

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Romanov story
« Reply #59 on: February 10, 2018, 04:23:01 AM »
I referred to meeting the Czechs because they were the nearest White troops to Ekaterinburg.

I like James's idea of a Czech speaking English with a Brooklyn accent!

Ann