Author Topic: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history  (Read 71892 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

David_Pritchard

  • Guest
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #30 on: August 05, 2005, 07:49:12 PM »
Alex the King,

Since you seem to be concerned that foreigners see the Serbs as fun loving civilised and reasonable people, please tell me the expected reaction of the Serbs to the future referendum of the Montenegrians for full independence from Serbia. Will they peacefully allow the Montenegrians to follow their own democratically choosen path or will Serbs destroy their country out of vengence? By the way, did you know that Monenegro was the only allied country that was actually punished for no reason by the post World War One treaties? It was given over to Serbia with out the consent of the King or the Parliament.

David

Offline palimpsest

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2648
  • nulla dies sine linea
    • View Profile
    • CERHAS
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #31 on: August 06, 2005, 12:27:23 AM »
David_Pritchard
You seem to be interested in giving a lesson, to preach moral values to these troublesome barbarian people. I maintain my opinion: you are a colonial ready to "civilize" the natives, with little understanding for unfamiliar traditions, eager to apply your set of convictions to others.

In what concerns Transylvania, Versailles, Trianon, post-WWI Europe and all, maybe it is best to continue in "The Hungarian Crown" thread, or in a new one you should name yourself.

Marlene
You are a born diplomat. But the topic seems to be too hot and serious for some. I have the distinct feeling we are going to receive a moral lesson.

Alex_for_King
You're arguments are not at all convincing, I'm sorry to say. As long as you adopt Western-European criteria for judging the Balkans your enthusiastic apology is doomed to fail. We are just like you, even better! you couldnt be more wrong. However I understand why you are compelled to do so.



Ill post my own opinion on the Balkans soon.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by palimpsest »
I, Claudius

Offline Alex_for_King

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 86
  • Serbia should be a Monarchy again!
    • View Profile
    • Serbian Royalty
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #32 on: August 06, 2005, 06:25:32 AM »
Okay.

Some things have happened that I thought would happen.

It is called culture clash.

Nobody from the West can understand the Balkans except the people who live in the Balkans.

I did not think you would ever understand. But, perhaps if you spent some time with me, hanging out, going to villages etc then perhaps you would understand, but not like this.

That is why I am not going to bother to reply. Think of yourselves as civilized and of us as barbaric, but that is just a prejudice. In any case, that is your view, which has been built by the recent media coverage of the wars in Yugoslavia and by the general idea that the Balkans are "dirty" or "primitive". I am sure that the dropping of a nuclear bomb on Japan was very civilized as was Britain's robbery of India's wealth. Okay. So, all of the West is civilized and all of the Balkans are barbaric. At least the people in the Balkans tend to settle scores between themselves. We did not occupy Germany, we did not bomb the United States. As I recall, it was the other way around. Just because the West has more material wealth does not make it more civilized. In any case, we have soul and spirit, the West has none. It's all about money. The West has totally lost all Christian values, portraying gay marriages as normal, including abortion etc. Do you think God's revenge will not happen??

The wars in Yugoslavia broke up because several ethnic groups wanted to seceede from the Union violently, not taking into account the vast Serbian population that, having experienced Croatian-Bosniaq genocide of Serbs during WW 2, did not want to stay in Croatia, nor the islamic state that the Bosniaqs wanted to make. We didn't just wake up one day and say - hey, let's make a Greater Serbia, because we could have done that in 1918, when we came victorous after WW 1.  We forgave Croats and let them in our state. We forgave them after WW 2 and let them into Yugoslavia again. If we wanted a Greater Serbia, we would have made it instead of sacrificing ourselves for Yugoslavia ("the Land of the Southern Slavs").
We wanted to save the Union for which we have given about 3 million lives since 1918.  I am sure Americans would crush any separatist movements without hesitating a second, and also terrorist movements. Of course it all went out of hand and Serbia lost. But don't think that only Serbs did crimes. Those who did them should be punished. Equal atrocities were committed by Croats, Bosniaqs, Albanians etc. It was an all-out brutal civil war in most of Yugoslavia... and all sides have committed crimes and suffered.

Montenegro has always been a Serbian state. Even the most prominent of Montenegrins such as Njegos or King Nikola called themselves Serbs. In any case, to read more on Montenegro, please visit
www.njegos.org
The vast English section and documents will show you that Montenegro is primarily a Serbian state. Now there is a "Montenegrin Orthodox Church", a "Montenegrin language" etc. Anyone who knows the Balkans will know that this is ridiculous.

Macedonia was a place in which Dushan was crowned as Tzar of the Serbian Empire. The only way it became a state was thanks to communist Tito, who was no Serb, and who created a Macedonian Republic and "Macedonian Orthodox Church". Officially, Tito was half Croat, half Slovene, but actually he was a Russian spy and it is known that prior to WW 2 he worked as an NKVD intelligence officer in Russia.

Serbia will not wreck Montenegro should they wish to leave. But when will Serbia be asked what it wants? In 1992, the people of Montenegro decided they wanted to stay with Serbia (not IN Serbia, but WITH Serbia). Nobody organized a referendum in Serbia. Now they want a referendum again and nobody wants to organize a referendum in Serbia, again. Montenegro has 600,000 people and Serbia has 7 million. Why do not the 7 million decide what they want, and the 600,000 can decide?

David Prichard, you have fallen victim to the demonized picture of Serbs, which is the result of Western media.

To learn more about the Serbian side of the story, please see
www.bannerofliberty.com
It is a site of Mary Mostert, an esteemed AMERICAN analyst who will show you quite a few facts, figures and statistics. The figures that will show you that SERBS are the most ethnically dispersed group today, the facts that will show you that SERBS were American allies in both world wars, not Croats. The fact that SERBS are the true owners of Kosovo and not Albanians, the fact that the Albanian KLA and the Bosniaq leadership was tied to Osama bin Laden, the fact that on many occassions the Western media have lied about the Serbs or just ignored the Serbian suffering, while showing the suffering of all other sides.

After you check out www.njegos.org and www.bannerofliberty.com and read at least some of the many articles there, then perhaps we can discuss it.

Cheers.


Offline Alex_for_King

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 86
  • Serbia should be a Monarchy again!
    • View Profile
    • Serbian Royalty
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #33 on: August 06, 2005, 06:37:12 AM »
What is Serbia?

Serbia is like a maiden, shy and impatient to be discovered. Full of dreams and promises like the chest which stores the maiden's clothes.

Serbia, a land of apples, plums and berries. A land of vineyards and sunflowers, of cornfields and meadows. Her rivers which shine in the sun are her eyes, and her corn swaying in the wind is her blonde hair. Her home made bread is her soul.

Serbia, mild, like a virgin, soft, unexplored, where the nature is still clean and the food is still healthy, where the people are warm, hospitable, where they hold true to their word.

Serbia greets the East and the West with her hands, while standing with one foot in the East and another foot in the West. Winds have blown from both the East and the West, trying to push Serbia one way or the other. But, all Serbia wanted was to be on its own.

Serbia, a Christian Orthodox land where 36 ethnic groups live in harmony. A land of breath-taking monasteries, whose frescoes are several centuries older than the finest works of art of European Renaissance. Serbia, a land of myths, legends, Kings and Queens, Tsars and Tsaresses, a land of epic poems and many proverbs, a land of the "opanak", the "kolo", the "slivovitza", a land of many customs and traditions, a land with a big heart and an even bigger soul.

Serbia, a land untamed, unconquered. A land which will greet everyone as a guest warmly, but will push agressors away with much resilliance. "A tough fruit", wrote Njegos. When a Czech soldier in the uniform of Austria-Hungary came to surrender, the Serbian general smiled at him and said: "Son, did you think it was that easy to just waltz into Serbia with an army?"  And many have tried to conquer Serbia. From the ancient times to the modern times. The islamic Turks, Austro-Hungarians, Bulgarians, Germans. Some did not have enough the first time, so they tried again - Germans, Bulgarians, Hungarians, but also Italians and Albanians. They all, eventually, failed. The communists, a form of "domestic occuppiers" have also come and gone, turning everything upside down...

And after each of these conquests, Serbia was left to count its dead in millions, to rebuild and to lick its wounds like a wounded lion. And each time Serbia miraculously managed to recover and stand back up on its feet. Like a phoenix, it always arose from the ashes. Nothing has managed to destroy Serbia. Neither the 500 years of islamic terror, nor the genocide during both world wars, nor Hitler, nor the communist anti-Christ Tito. Nor the toughest sanctions that the world had seen, nor the 78 days of Nato's daily and nightly bombs. We have suffered greatly, of course, loosing millions of lives and trillions of dollars worth of property during all those events, but we have survived. Why that is so? Because of two things - one is our faith in Jesus Christ and the other is our Slavic soul, which is as wide as the sky and as big as the Heavens.

As Oskar Davico wrote: "Serbia is a song amongst all songs. An uprising amongst the peoples". Many Serbian epic poems and traditional folk songs have described this "Slavic soul". The courage to fight an enemy 10 times stronger, the desire to fight for the freedom of Serbia and what Serbia considers to be Serbian Lands, her rivers, lakes, fields, forests, villages, heros, Kings, and above all - songs of love for one's country, and of love between a man and a woman, a love pure and innocent, as once love was.

That, my friends, is Serbia.

Greetings from Belgrade,
Alex

Offline Alex_for_King

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 86
  • Serbia should be a Monarchy again!
    • View Profile
    • Serbian Royalty
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #34 on: August 06, 2005, 07:26:58 AM »
[quote author=TampaBay

Alex_for_King,

On your next trip to North American, come to Florida. I will personally introduce yo to "Floridian" culture.

I cannot promise you "controlled chaos" only total chaos as we have a large supply always on hand...

TampaBay


Thanks TampaBay!

I have always wanted to visit the US - particularly New York, Chicago, Washington DC, LA and Miami. I have managed to visit Canada because my sister is now a Canadian citizen. But, I have some friends in Chicago and perhaps some day I will visit. The US seems to be a dream place for many, a huge country well worth the visit. Perhaps only that could be the way for various cultures to break free from prejudices which run both ways - to meet.

We Serbs have many mixed feelings about the United States, bacause of recent events which have caused us a lot of pain. I personally was a student at the American Embassy School as my father was a diplomat of the then Yugoslavia in New Delhi. So, I have had special feelings for America... until the sanctions and the bombings came. That really hurt. You should know that my buddies and I were drinking one night during the bombings in 1999. And the situation got really heated up and they brought a US flag from somewhere, and they wanted to burn it in revolt. Of course I was much hurt by what my childhood idol - The United States - was doing to my country, my people, but I knew that the bad times will be over and that we will need US support once Milosevic is out of the picture. So, I stood between the two guys and I prevented them from burning the flag. I yelled: "NO!!! We cannot do this, it is not right. We were American allies twice, we will need their support when this madness is over"... I was even ready to fight the guy holding the flag. So, I saved a US flag even though I was very angry at the US back then.

My answer is, thank you for inviting me to see Florida. That sounds like a lovely place, as I gathered from movies. But, for now the US is a destination that is too far away and too expensive for my budget.

Perhaps if you had suggested something closer, in Europe, I would say yes.

Thanks anyway. Sweet.

Alex

P.S. My yacht is in the repair shop currently and my private jet is grounded as the airport personnell are on strike :) :) :)

Finelly

  • Guest
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #35 on: August 06, 2005, 11:01:37 AM »
Nobody from the West can understand the Balkans except the people who live in the Balkans.  

Oh, well, then.  WHy bother.

Offline TampaBay

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 4215
  • Being TampaBay is a Full Time Job.
    • View Profile
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #36 on: August 06, 2005, 12:06:34 PM »
Nobody from the West can understand the Balkans except the people who live in the Balkans.

Then please try and enlighten us.

I for one have read and re-read every post on this thread. I am more confused now than when I began.

I am not sure I even know which countries are truly "Balkan". Is Romania consider a true "Balkan" Country? What about Greece? Romania I have a good grasp on but the other countries are very difficult to understand.

Please, "Balkan" dudes quit arguing with each so you may team up and work together to enlighten ignorant Americans like myself who wish to learn all they can.

TampaBay
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by TampaBay »
"Fashion is so rarely great art that if we cannot appreciate great trash, we should stop going to the mall.

David_Pritchard

  • Guest
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #37 on: August 06, 2005, 02:37:36 PM »
Nobody from the West can understand the Balkans except the people who live in the Balkans.

I cannot say that the West has ever actually cared to understand the Balkan peoples but rather to be able to explain their behaviors and motivations. Western interests have always been more concerned that the Balkan peoples simply excercise emotional self control and learn the concept of Rule of Law. In other words, to be more like Western Europeans. Of course this is not going to happen any time soon, if ever.

Nulla dies sine linea, I suppose that this quote is purely quantitative rather than qualitative. A quote from Horace rather than Pliny might be more appropriate, Parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus.

David
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by David_Pritchard »

Offline Alex_for_King

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 86
  • Serbia should be a Monarchy again!
    • View Profile
    • Serbian Royalty
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #38 on: August 06, 2005, 03:28:53 PM »
Dear TampaBay,

Of course it is possible for Westerners to understand the Balkans and vice versa, we just need a little bit of goodwill coming both ways.

However, it is not possible when people like Palimsest or David Pritchard start off by saying we Balkanians are all barbarians. Excuse me, but that really hurts. The Decani monastery in Kosovo and the Kotor Old Town in Montenegro are protected by UNESCO as parts of the WORLD HERITAGE.

That is a prejudice, like saying: all Muslims are terrorists, etc.

Anyway, on to the answer:

The Balkans include "dudes" from the former Yugoslavia - except Slovenia which by mentality and standard of living cannot be treated as a Balkan country but as a country in the Alps / central European.

That means that all the other "dudes" of the former Yugoslavia are Balkan countries: Croatia, Serbia and Montenegro, Bosnia and Hercegovina, and Macedonia. Croatia wants to present itself as a "civilized" Central European country and they try to run away from the Balkans, but they can't. The others have no problems with being in the Balkans, it does not bother them.

Apart from the former Yugoslavia, other countries, namely Bulgaria, Romania, Albania and Greece are also Balkan countries.

Greece is so far the only Balkan and Christian Orthodox country that is a member of the EU. By 2007, Romania and Bulgaria will join the EU as well.

Hungary is not a Balkan country, neither is the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Poland etc. Although formerly communist countries, they belong to Central Europe and not the Balkans.

The people in the Balkans, or at least in Serbia, are stuck between the West and the East. There is a lot of Byzantine, Ottoman Turkish or Austrian-Hungarian influence, and a clash of centuries and civilizations.

Bulgarians, Romanians, Serbs, Montenegrins, Macedonians and Greeks are Christian Orthodox. Albanians are mostly Muslim and Catholic. In Bosnia one part of the country is predominantly Muslim (Bosniaq). The Serbs, Macedonians and Bulgarians have their own forms of cyrilic writing which they can all read and understand. The Bulgarians have kept some Russian letters, which Serbs and Macedonians have thrown out.

The Romanians by language are like Italians.

The Greeks have their own alphabet and language which is unique.

Serbia is located at the very heart of the Balkans. Serbs can understand people in Bosnia, Croatia and Macedonia - logically since all that was Yugoslavia, we can even understand people in Bulgaria. But, Serbs cannot understand Romanians. Most Serbs are familiar with the Greek alphabet through mathematics so we can read Greek but we cannot understand it.

For the first time in its long history, the Balkans are truly beginning to cooperate. It is going a bit slower with former Yugoslav ("South Slav") nations because of recent wars, but even they will eventually end up cooperating.

For the first time the bridges, the pipelines, the geographic and strategic location etc are used for economic cooperation rather than the cause for war.

Right now the biggest threat in the Balkans comes from islamic expansion. While Serbs and Croats have given up their dreams of a "Greater Serbia" or "Greater Croatia", the real threat to peace in the Balkans now, and in the near future, lies with the Albanians. They have not given up their dreams of a "Greater Albania". That country would include the Serbian holy province of Kosovo, and 3 municipalities outside of Kosovo which are called Southern Serbia, about half of Macedonia, bits of Montenegro and bits of Greece. The threat of islamic expansion in the Balkans is very real, and Christian Europe should be concerned.

The peoples of the Balkans differ from their Western counterparts also by the work habits. The Balkan peoples like to unwind, relax, enjoy life rather than just work, work, work, although Western work habits are slowly reaching the Balkans as well. Because most Balkan peoples are used to hardships, they are used to having little and being content with what they have. But, most of all, they know how to have fun with little money. While Serbs and Macedonians have brass bands and girls dancing on top of tables, with glasses being smashed as a song "hits a nerve", the Greeks are known for their plate smashing.

You don't just smash a glass or a bottle (in Serbia), or a plate (in Greece). Usually, it is a song that really gets you going, a love song that stirs emotions or reminds you of a former love, and THEN you smash glasses, bottles or plates.

So, the Balkan peoples are a bit tempered and very emotional. They are all also very proud of their long histories and heritage.

They also differ by looks. The Bulgarians, Macedonians and Serbs in Southern Serbia are of a slightly darker skin complexion.

The Balkan countries are not as neat as, say, Germany. But, the emotions are so different.

I have cousins from Germany - they once brought a German friend. As opposed to them, who have been to Belgrade many times and know our mentality, she had previously not been in Serbia.

It was New Years party at some club. We had a nice dinner and everything was "normal". Then, at midnight, the Gypsy brass bands came and all hell broke loose. People were happy, in a delirium, and some hot chick climed a table and started dancing. It was total mayhem. At first the German young lady was frightened, but after drinking the "slivovitza" (plum brandy) she relaxed. After that, she was so relaxed and she had a lot of fun, she danced the "kolo" (or tried to dance it). By 4 am she said she had never had that much fun in her whole life. There was no way she could experience something like that in Germany.

When she came the next time, I joked with her: "So, you want to grab some lunch at McDonald's?" She laughed: "No way, I have that in Germany, let's go to some wild Serbian place".

So, that's the Balkans. A place where emotions run high, in war and peace, in love and hate. Things like history, origin, family, flag, national songs, religion, war, peace etc are taken very seriously and one should not joke about these things as the reaction will be tempered. The Orthodox religion shows a lot of respect for those who have died and that too is important.

The peoples of the Balkans are tempered - they can get angry one minute and relax the next minute. They are often jealous in a relationship. Most Balkan countries are patriarchal. This is a traditionally male dominated society although that is slowly changing. Women can have normal education, careers, we have women in politics, executive places etc. But, generally, it still is a patriarchal society. Slowly, the Western values are coming through, via the media, education system etc.

It is very important that the Balkan countries preserve their mentality, customs, way of life. I would not like Serbia to become just another carbon copy of Germany, France or any other Western country. We should have a free market economy and capitalism, we should have democracy, but we must keep our religion, customs, language, the way we write, and the way we live. Just as Americans have their way of life, so do we.

What I do not like about the EU is that national identities are slowly being chipped away. The EU nations had lost their centuries-old currencies, what is next? Will they one day be forced to drop their flags, national anthems, will just the European ones be used?

But, I am aware that the EU is a process which cannot be avoided, economically and politically. We will all end in it, sooner or later, and that has its advantages. I just want Serbia to preserve what it is, what makes it a nation, a people. We should preserve our history, religion, culture, habits, customs, language, the way we write etc.

Cheers, TampaBay,
Alex


« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Alex_for_King »

Finelly

  • Guest
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #39 on: August 06, 2005, 03:45:22 PM »
Unfortunately, what is also coming through is the bad stuff from the West. The homosexuals are beginning to speak up,

Well, I think you just shoved your foot waaaay into your mouth.  Chew hard.  You are not making friends here.

Offline Forum Admin

  • Administrator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 4616
  • www.alexanderpalace.org
    • View Profile
    • Alexander Palace Time Machine
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #40 on: August 06, 2005, 03:55:46 PM »
Alex.
You will please apologize for the homosexuals remark. Which I have removed from your posting. There will be no further warning on such behavior.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by admin »

David_Pritchard

  • Guest
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #41 on: August 06, 2005, 05:29:18 PM »
Dear Alex,

I do hope that you realise that my previous post regarding the Balkans was of the point of view of Western European and US foreign policy, not of my personal opinion. While I cannot write that I am a Slavophile, I can state that I am a Russophile, so I am at least open to be sympathetic to the Serbian situation.

What is unfortunate, is that you as a Serb do not recognise the injustice of the Allied Nations through the Treaties of Versailles and Trianon that put Serbia in the position of imperial master over the Croats, Slovenes, Hungarians, Bulgarians and Bosniacs. Their gifts to Serbia are a pestilence that keep on giving. Can anyone imagine how much better off Serbia would now be if from 1920 the country had only consisted of lands occupied by Serbian families?

My comments in Latin were to the person who started this thread, seemingly for his or her own amusement. He stired the pot and we unsuspectingly joined his soup.

David
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by David_Pritchard »

Offline palimpsest

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2648
  • nulla dies sine linea
    • View Profile
    • CERHAS
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #42 on: August 06, 2005, 07:07:52 PM »
David
Parturient montes, nascetur ridiculus mus[ a poet, who promises great and holds few] I accept the charge! I wish I could follow closely this discussion but Im unfortunately not able to. What I have to say about it can't be put in a few lines and I write very slowly. Thank you for your im-patience! ;D

Nulla dies sine linea[practice every day]
I use my Pliny quote [actually Apelles] for several reasons.  
-It is my professional motto [Im an architect]
-It is for me an ironic description of forums
-to remind my of my Greek&Latin heritage

As for your Balkans, this scholastic adage seems very appropriate:
Graecum est, non legitur [It is in Greek, dont read it!]
I, Claudius

David_Pritchard

  • Guest
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #43 on: August 06, 2005, 11:31:10 PM »
Why exactly do you write so slowly? Opus artificem probat? Is English not your primary language? If not we could continue our one sided discussion about the Balkans in French.

David

Offline ilyala

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2071
  • il y a
    • View Profile
Re: The Balkans--their cultures, languages, religion and history
« Reply #44 on: August 07, 2005, 03:29:29 AM »
wow, the girl goes on a holiday and look what she misses!

my first priority here is revolved around the transylvania remarks. even before the first world war, in statistics made up by the hungarian government who had every interest to diminish the romanian presence in transylvania, it was shown that more than half of the population in transylvania was made up of romanians. even then. they were treated very badly, they were 'tolerated', not allowed to public functions and all, and yet they were more than all the other nations combined. transylvania did not, does not and probably won't ever belong to hungary. deal with it.

same goes for many other provinces that were attached to the hungarian crown for centuries. transylvania at least had 30% hungarians. there were regions that had around 8% hungarians and were still claimed! if it weren't such a serious matter i'd laugh my ass off at the claims.

as for alex, he does make some point. i am not defending his homosexual remarks, because they are wrong. but there is such a thing as a balcanic spirit and i can understand the dread of going to a western country and noticing too many rules ruling the simple stuff in life that should never be ruled. i grew up wanting to get out of my country but when i did all i wanted was to get back in. maybe i was raised in a too 'laissez-faire' atmosphere, maybe it's just a cultural diffference. but the so-called 'free', civilized states seem too rigid to me, and it seems like the people are anything but free over there (i am not generalizing, i am sure there are lots of free people over there, i am talking about the atmosphere, the impression i got...)... they are kept locked up by an abundance of rules that never should have been made up.

as for the bad influence, there is one. the old values are lost. the abundance of cheap bad movies, cheap bad food (fast food replacing the traditional nutricious meals) etc etc. but the people with character stayed the same and i suppose the others wouldn't have been much better with or without influence...

globalization is a great process because it leads to one united planet (some day...) but a lot of good things are lost on the way...
'loving might be a mistake, but it's worth making'
ilya