Author Topic: PLACES CONNECTED WITH RASPUTIN  (Read 33270 times)

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Offline Helen_Azar

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Re: Pokrovskoe
« Reply #15 on: February 24, 2005, 07:59:07 PM »
From "A Lifelong Passion", p. 616:

Nicky, Diary - 14/27 April - Tiumen

...We had to change horses in the village of Pokrovskoe, which meant standing for a long time right opposite Grigory [Rasputin] house, and we saw his whole family looking through the window...


So there we have it - it really happened - from the horse's mouth (no pun intended  ;) )  



Offline nigbil

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Re: Pokrovskoe
« Reply #16 on: February 25, 2005, 01:36:16 AM »
Good on you, Helen. So now we seem to have it finally established and agreed, I return to my initial observation.

Is it not an extraordinary co-incidence that Nicholas (et al) should stop not just in Rasputin's village/town but outside or opposite his house?

Now its possible to debunk every prophesy Rasputin made (and I think the 'debunkers' are in a majority on this website) but it seems that this one is more difficult to set aside. Now all we need to find is a primary source that either noted that Rasputin said this to the Empress or commented that they had heard from someone else that Rasputin had said this to the Empress - and before 1917.

The last thing would be to mathematically calculate the odds against a Tsar visiting a remote village in the largest country in the world. Is there any record of any other Tsar visiting this place? Presumably there might have been something in the village itself if it had ever happened.

To me, if the truth of one 'prophesy' can be substantially verified, it would add credence to the rest.

Offline Helen_Azar

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Re: Pokrovskoe
« Reply #17 on: February 25, 2005, 07:58:01 AM »
I am wondering, do we know for sure that this "prophecy" was legit and not something someone came up with or "readjusted" after the fact? Sort of like the one about the whole family ending up dead within a year of Rasputin's death (they say that one was made up). Is it possible that Rasputin's words were sort of distorted after someone found out that N & A had gone to Pokrovskoe, in order to make the story sound "juicier"? After all, when Nicholas writes about it in his diary, he doesn't sound very surprised or even mentions the fact that "Grigory predicted that we would be here", or something to that affect. He just very matter-of-factly mentions the fact that they were stading for a long time in front of Grigori's house while the horses wer changed.... I think that at least Alexandra would have written something about this in her diary - if it really was something she remembered Rasputin saying, since she was a big believer in his prophecies. As far as I know she didn't mention it, or maybe she did?


Offline Arleen

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Re: Pokrovskoe
« Reply #18 on: February 25, 2005, 09:25:23 AM »
There is a picture of the CARTS that N&A were taken from Tobolsk in, would someone look for it and post it here??
..Arleen

Offline Helen_Azar

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Re: Pokrovskoe
« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2005, 09:47:32 AM »
Here is the description of the "tarantas":

A Russian tarantass:  

"Has the reader any idea what the vehicle called tarantas in Russian is really like? Capable of being driven over rocks, boulders or, as a matter of fact, over any imaginable surface, it must have been invented in the days when no roads existed at all. It consists of two long, springy poles, about four inches thick, placed parallel and bridging the two wheel axles to which they are attached. A large wicker-work body, broad enough to hold two people, is placed between the two poles in the centre between the axles. A light seat is sometimes fixed inside the body, and the more luxurious tarantasses are provided with a hood. The coachman perches on a small seat over the fore-axle and the whole contraption is harnessed to three horses, the one in the centre running between two shafts. When passengers are about to leave a posting inn, a mattress covered with a feather blanket is spread over the bottom of the body. With a little luck one is able to snatch some sleep stretched out at full length provided the doing is not too rough. In theory, the springy poles are supposed to take up the bumping, but in actual practice they are usually so stiff and strong for the sake of solidity that one is mercilessly jolted about or bounced to and fro if the pace is hot. Because of this, and the fact that as an inspecting Senator and consequently an important personage I was always driven at top speed, we called the tarantass a 'horse-powered liver-massaging device'.

Offline Arleen

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Re: Pokrovskoe
« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2005, 10:06:41 AM »
Oh Helen, It just makes me hurt all over reading that.....poor Alexandra!  ...And you know they say she never complained!
 ..Arleen

Offline Helen_Azar

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Re: Pokrovskoe
« Reply #21 on: February 27, 2005, 08:40:05 PM »
Back to Nigbil's original question, does anyone know if this "prophecy" was for real or was it embellished after the fact?

Offline Grigorevna

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Villa Rhode and Rasputin's Other Haunts
« Reply #22 on: May 04, 2005, 06:57:18 AM »
... the restaurant in Petersburg where Gregory Yefimovich is said to have had his "orgies" - where exactly was it situated? What happened to it?

//Grigorevna
« Last Edit: April 13, 2009, 10:30:53 PM by Alixz »

Offline rudy3

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Re: Villa Rode...
« Reply #23 on: May 05, 2005, 06:16:52 AM »
The address was Stroganovskaja ulica, nr 2, next to the Stroganov bridge. in the outskirts of the city, in a place called "Novaja Derevnja". Founded in 1908. On its place today stands metrostation Chernaja Rechka.

Offline Grigorevna

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Pokrovskoye
« Reply #24 on: July 21, 2005, 05:15:08 AM »
Dear all,
I have tried to figure out a bit about Pokrovskoye, but it is indeed quite hard - the descriptions of Gregory Yefimovich's village are scarce. Not to mention incorrect, as well.

So does anyone know more in detail what Pokrovskoye looked/looks like? How many families lived there? Did they have their own church/priest? What was the economic status of the village? Did they have their own mir? Did they answer to any nobleman? (Probably not, no?) In other words - what was its socio-economic place in the rural society?

If anyone has any pictures, it would be great to see them!!  :)

//Grigorevna
« Last Edit: April 14, 2009, 04:28:11 PM by Alixz »

Offline Richard_Cullen

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Re: Pokrovkoye
« Reply #25 on: July 21, 2005, 10:03:29 AM »
When I was working on the TimeWatch programme 'Who Killed Rasputin?' there were some clips used in an older BBC programme on Rasputin that showed the village.  This was old, early moving image stuff that had been reproduced.

Although I need to search through some of the books that I have on Rasputin I think there are some photographs of the village at the trun of the 20th century (up to about the time of his death) plus some details of the number of villagers etc.

Richard
I feel like one
Who treads alone
Some banquet-hall deserted,
Whose lights are fled,
Whose garlands dead,
And all, but he, departed!
Refrain:
Thus, in the stilly night,
Ere slumberís chain hath bound me,
Sad memíry brings the light
Of other days around me.

Thomas Moore 1815

Offline Annie

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Re: Pokrovkoye
« Reply #26 on: July 23, 2005, 08:16:36 PM »
I can't wait to see your show, Richard!

I know Sydney Gibbes took some pictures of it as he traveled across Siberia out of Russia. I think the pics are in the Left Behind book by Sophie Buxhoevedon?

That's another of Rasputin's weird predictions. He told Alexandra she would see his village, but not visit it. She thought, how could that be. But she did see it, out the train window, on her way to exile, but could not stop!

Offline Grigorevna

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Re: Pokrovkoye
« Reply #27 on: July 24, 2005, 03:59:23 AM »
Thanks, Richard, it would be fantastic to share some of that material.  :)  

//Grigorevna

AlexP

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Re: Pokrovkoye
« Reply #28 on: August 06, 2005, 09:15:54 AM »
Pokrovskoye still exists as a village in the Tyumen Region.

Tourists are regularly lead to visit Rasputin's village.

His family home has been well-preserved.

If you look on the Internet, under Pokrovskoye, Tyumen, you will find pictures of interest I believe.

Hope that helps you.

Offline Grigorevna

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Re: Pokrovkoye
« Reply #29 on: August 06, 2005, 11:02:33 AM »
Lovely, I'll do that. :)
//Grigorevna