Author Topic: Historical Anecdotes  (Read 33729 times)

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Offline Tsaritsa

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #45 on: March 26, 2005, 03:29:02 AM »
I love to read stories of OTMAA.  To know they were regular children though they lived in a palace.  The children were involved in mischief just like other children.  It makes them so real somehow.
"Somehow it's always easier to talk brave than be brave."  Hannibal Heyes

Offline hikaru

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #46 on: March 27, 2005, 09:50:36 AM »
Nicholas II was a fan of the hunting.

Once upon a time in Belovezskaya Puscha (Belorussia) at the hunting , GD Nikolay Nikolaevich and Duke Kochubey both at the same time shooted and murdered the big deer with 32 edges on his bugles (horns?).!!
Both of the hunters desired to take the bugles to their different places and they discussed it with great passion. Nicholas II approched to them saying: "Calme my dears, The bugles will be mine. I am the only owner hear".

But Nicholas II was very kind Tsar and he ordered to make 2 exact replicas of the above bugles abroad and then sent them to the 2 men.

Offline Ming

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #47 on: March 27, 2005, 12:36:36 PM »
Thank you again, all, for these prescious anecdotes!  Reading them, for the first time, I'm actually beginning to understand, a little, the personalities of the imperial family, and how they related to each other and other people.  These stories have really touched my heart in a special way, and has brought me closer to understanding the family as "real" people.  They are very, very special, and I really appreciate hearing them from everyone.  Again, many thanks!

Offline hikaru

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #48 on: March 28, 2005, 09:00:07 AM »
After the revolt of the Decabrists, where the cream of the russian aristocracy participated, Moscow's Governor Rastopchin said the following sentence:
"French Revolution was made by shoemakers . It is clear- they wanted to become  the aristocrats. But at our place, the revolution was made by aristocrats...
I wonder, if all of them were willing to become shoemakers? IT is hard to believe!"

Offline hikaru

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #49 on: March 29, 2005, 09:21:02 AM »
Alexandr III was a very  witty person.
Many of his resolutions became classic.
Here is the one story: in one of the province state institutions one mouzhik ( a male peasant)  spited out to the portrait of the Tsar. Of course, it was considered as the insult of the Tsar and muzhik was convinced by trial for 6 mounths of the jail. This case was reported to the Tsar. Alexandr III homerically laughed - his laugh filled all Anichkov Palace.
"Why? - The Emperor cried. - He spited out to my Portrait and I have to feed him for that? Do not be silly, Gospoda (Gentlemen) Let him go far far away and say to him That I ,at my side, would like to spit on him (i.e.non care on him). This case is resolved. Nothing special"

Offline hikaru

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #50 on: March 31, 2005, 03:10:14 AM »
This is the one which I heard from my Grand Grand Mother.
In order to understand it, you have to imagine the location of St. Issac Cathedral , Peter the Great Monument and Monument of Nicholas I :
" Fool man is trying to catch up the clever man , though
Isaakiy do not let him go"

In russian it sounds as follows: "Durak umnogo dogonyaet , da Isaakiy ne puskaet".

(According to this anecdotic verbs Fool Man is Nicholas I and Clever Man is Peter the Great)


Offline hikaru

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #51 on: April 04, 2005, 02:36:41 AM »
Alix decided to give to each daughter  one pearl  every year as a present  for birthday and Saint's day (imeniny) for the purpose to make beads when each girl wil come of age.
At the same time, she wanted to  save the money and she ordered to the Court Ministry to buy not whole beads but  one per one pearl every time.
The connected persons told to her million times that to buy whole bead will be  obviously more cheaper than to buy  pearls one by one . But  , nevertheless, Alix did not change her mind.
So, Mr. Frederix   ( Minister of the Court) gave the order to the duke Obolensky to buy 4 beads at once and to send to the Alix one pearl by one in the fixed days.

Finally, Everybody were content. Alix never knew about this. She thought that they buy pearls one by one.



Offline hikaru

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #52 on: April 04, 2005, 11:38:51 AM »
When ,at the end of the 1980th during repair works of Hermitage Theather was discovered the 1st Floor of the Winter Palace of Peter the Great, everybody were astonished.
But when in the one room of the palace the 300years  bottles of wine were found, everybody were shocked:

The sort of the favorite french wine of Peter the Great was - "L'Ermitage".

Peter the Great never could imagine that on his wine cellar with "L'Ermitage" wine , in 150 year , the Catherine the Great will build the L'Ermitage museum and theather.

(Catherine the Great did not think of it too.
But maybe not. Who Knows?)

Offline hikaru

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #53 on: April 06, 2005, 11:01:14 AM »
Catherine the Great , when doctors treated her by
taking her blood, used to say that "let the final portion of my German blood to go out - I want be 100% Russian - with russian blood only".

Offline hikaru

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #54 on: April 06, 2005, 11:09:23 AM »
The famous historical person for GD Olga Nikolaevna was Catherine the Great.
"  All stories about her  - nothing that only beautiful sentenses , - said Alexandra Feodorovna once time? -  nothing significant matter  or real deal  at all."

"But beautiful words support people as crutchs do, - objected Olga,- During Catherine's time , they said a lot
of beautiful words and those beatiful words then transferred to the real deals ( or affairs)."

Offline hikaru

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #55 on: April 10, 2005, 01:36:41 AM »
At the beginning of the 1850th, Nicholas II Visited Smolny Institute. He was not satisfied with the luch which were served for the girls there.
He tried soup and said shortly - Soup is bad.
- But Bread is good!,- Maman exclaimed.

Main dish was served. Nicholas did not like it too.
- Zharkoe is bad,- Nicholas said knitting his brows.
- But Kwas is good, Your Imperial Highess! ,- said Maman with passion.
Nicholas smiled involuntary and a thunder has passed away.


Offline hikaru

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #56 on: April 13, 2005, 10:37:16 AM »
When the dresses with narrow jupes became fashionable, Countess Zinaida Nikolaevna Yusupov tried new dress one of the first. When she met Alix, she boasted  without any delay about "a miracle  thing which was sent directly from Paris".
Practically minded Alexandra Feodorovna did not share the Zinaida's delight by saying: " You will be unable  run in such dress ever a 3 steps...."
Yusupov confused and asked :
"But..Why should I run, Your Royal Highness?".
Alix kept silent, feeling be offended.
The discussion was over.

Offline hikaru

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #57 on: April 17, 2005, 10:30:58 AM »
When Alexei was 1 or 2 years old.
He was very close with Olga. She looked after him carefully and he used to say when he was angry to his Papa and Mama :  " I am not your son. I am Olga's one".
Saying this, Alexei usually took his staff (toys etc) and went to the Olga's room.

Offline Crimson_Snow

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #58 on: April 22, 2005, 05:12:40 AM »
If anyone is interested:




Moghilev/Mogilev, Russia


In the massive wake of ancient cathedral, blowing snow swept across the face of a Russian general as he gazed upon a sea of white. It was the village of Moghilev.
“Only in Russia,” the solider said, enjoying the last drag from his cigarette, “would we pick a town as lovely as this to house an army.”
It was his army he was referring too.
Nicholas Alexandrovich Romanov- the Emperor of All Russia never asked to be the tsar. In fact, he accepted the title of tsar with as much enthusiasm one reserves for an unwanted gift. Regardless, the tsar was who he was and for the last twenty years and he was growing increasingly tired of it. God-like power is a heavy load to bear for any mere man.
As he exhaled an icy cloud of smoke, Nicholas deep blue eyes watched the shifting snow dance upon the nearby rooftops. The sight reminded him of home- Petersburg. At that moment, a shiver traveled down his back and he remembered where he was.
A tall steeple hovered over him like a bad omen. It was Moghilev’s age-old cathedral and for the last twenty minutes Nicholas was mustering enough courage to enter it. In the past, he had visited the church frequently but tonight was different.
“Enough,” the tsar said, as he discarded his cigarette, “I have already wasted enough time.”
Swiftly, the tsar scaled the remaining stone steps.
Inside the church, the Russian wandered nervously through a dimly lit hall until he came across a hint of milky light.  Following it, he traced the dancing light to the church’s inner sanctum. The high-arched chamber was a glow in thick flickering light. Hundreds, perhaps, thousands of lit candles lined the altar wall. It was a beautiful sight.
Then, as he paused to stroke his beard, Nicholas noticed the faces staring back at him. Mixed within the candles were tiny portraits of young men in imperial uniforms. Hopefully, he thought they did not all represent the town’s honored dead, but he knew they did.
Removing his jacket, he asked himself how could there be so many? He knew his country was engaged in a bruising war with Germany but how could there be so many?
“What a terrible waste? A generation lost for what?” He had no answer. Just grief.
Approaching the altar, he tossed his hat and jacket over a vacant pew and knelled before his Maker. It was time. “Dear God, what have I done?” Dropping to his knees, “There is still time. Guide me, oh Lord. Allow me to save those souls not yet lost.” Tsar Nicholas removed a crumbled up letter from his pocket. It was what bore so heavily on his mind. It was from Father Rasputin- the Siberian that had saved his only son.


I feel I shall leave life before January 1. I want to make known to the Russian people, to Papa, to the Russian Mother and to the children, to the land of Russia, what they must understand. If I am killed by common assassins, and especially by my brothers the Russian peasants, you, Tsar of Russia, have nothing to fear, remain on your throne and govern, and you, Russian Tsar have nothing to fear for your children, they will reign for hundred of years in Russia. But if I am murdered by boyars, by nobles, if they shed my blood, their hands will remain soiled with blood, for twenty-five years they will not wash their hands from my blood. They will leave Russia. Brothers will kill their brothers, and they will kill each other and hate each other, and for twenty-five years there will be no nobles in the country. Tsar of the land of Russia, if you hear a sound of a bell which will tell you that Grigory has been killed, you must know this: if it was your relations who wrought my death then no one of your family, that is to say none of your children or relations, will remain alive for more than two years. They will be killed by the Russian people. I go and I feel in me the divine command to tell the Russian Tsar how he must live if I have disappeared. You must reflect and act prudently. Think of your safety and tell your relations that I have paid for them with my own blood. I shall be killed. I am no longer among the living. Pray, pray, be strong, think of your blessed family.
                                                                                   Grigory


Closing his eyes, he continued to pray for his family.
As he opened them, the tsar concentrated on the solid oak cross that centered the chamber.  The tsar became hypnotized by it as he recalled a past conversation with the prophet. Nicholas once asked the Siberian, “When will the war end?” Rasputin replied: “When you take Constantinople that will be the end of it.”
Grigory spoke the truth. Why was it that his sole purpose for this war was the liberation of that forgotten Christian city? Why? As his eyelids grew heavy, he knew that answer all too well. He was the one chosen to restore the cross to the altar of St. Sophia. Professor Pobyedonostzev his tutor as a child had foreseen it. Over and over, he would say, “Nicholas, my dear child, save Constantinople from the Turks. It is the founding city of the Russian Orthodox Church held captive by the Muslim faith. Restore the cross to the altar of St. Sophia. To do so, the Lord would bless thy.”
How many times had he heard that same message, in these past few years resound in his head? Far too many times but today his armies were no closer to its gates then before the war. Perhaps the professor was wrong? It was not his legacy to be known as ‘great.’ In Petersburg, the tsar was referred to as anything but great.
“Oh Lord? Through your abundant Grace, you sacrificed your only son to wash away the world’s sin- now what do you wish of me?”
At that moment, the heavy wooden doors of the church swung open. Nicholas continued to pray, “Whatever you choose, let thy will be done.”
Through the doors, a stranger appeared accompanied by a strong breeze that blew out a majority of the candles along with knocking down several of the pictures.  Closing the vast doors, the bald intruder bowed and quietly entered the darkened cathedral. It was the Cossack Chekov the tsar’s most trusted bodyguard. Wearing a bright green greatcoat that ran to the floor, the Cossack’s enormous frame nearly filled the aisleway as he quickly approached his sovereign. He was thankful His Majesty was okay.
Wearing a rare grin, he asked the figure of the Mother of God, “Duty calls.”
“Your Majesty,” the Cossack said, scanning the room for possible danger, “I have been looking for you for over an hour.”
“And now you found me.”
“Your Grace, it is not safe for you to walk the streets alone. Radicals wander the streets- even in Moghilev.”
Before Nicholas could respond, an old and disheveled priest emerged from a side entrance. Still wearing his bedclothes, he appeared half asleep. “What’s with this racket? It’s nearly morning for god sake.”
“Sorry Father,” the Russian tsar replied, “I could not sleep.”
Instantly recognizing him, “Your Majesty,” he said falling to the floor, “I am so honored.”  In Russia, the tsar was considered to be God’s gift to the people- just a notch below the Creator. His Majesty was the magical glue that held together the church and state. Without him, the entire empire would fall to pieces.
His Grace was tired of playing god.  “Father, please, stand up. I am not worthy of such praise.” Nicholas gathered his fur hat and overcoat as he heard the priest mumble that he was the chosen one.  
“Your Majesty, who is more worthy than you?” the obedient priest declared as he rose. “Is there anything I can do for you? Perhaps a prayer?”
“Yes, that would be nice.”
“Splendid! Let’s see, what should I prayer for?” the priest said as he scratched his head. “Oh, I know. How about a glorious victory this spring?”
“No,” he replied as he marched towards the door. Turning back, “Just pray for--”
At that moment, the steeple bell chimed in the hour. Four bells, it was late- too late for anyone to pray for peace. In three days the tsar would be dead.
      

end of chapter II

DS



"History would be a good thing if it were only true."  T

bluetoria

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Re: Historical Anecdotes
« Reply #59 on: April 22, 2005, 05:38:54 AM »
Hi Crimson Snow  :)

Thank you for writing all of this. I think the Rasputin letter is discussed at some length on another thread (but can't remember where  :-/ ).
Please could you say where this extract comes from? Is it a novel?