Author Topic: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants  (Read 283421 times)

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Offline Svetabel

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #135 on: February 03, 2006, 12:14:47 AM »
Unfortunately I don't know more. :( A discussion on this subject you can find on the Balkans Forum, on "Missy and Boris affair" thread. I tried to find out more info but still nothing... :(

Emilia

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #136 on: February 03, 2006, 08:57:34 AM »
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Unfortunately I don't know more. :( A discussion on this subject you can find on the Balkans Forum, on "Missy and Boris affair" thread. I tried to find out more info but still nothing... :(

Thanks anyway!

Offline imperial angel

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #137 on: February 03, 2006, 10:49:55 AM »
I have read two biographies of Marie, and never heard of this, but given her personality perhaps. I don't know much about the youth of Grand Duke Dmitri..

Offline KarlandZita

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #138 on: February 23, 2006, 11:23:29 AM »
Does anyone have more infos and pics of the American wife of Grand Duc Dimitri, please ? I would like to learn more about her.
Thanks in advance for your answers.
Reginei Mama Elena a Romaniei

David_Pritchard

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #139 on: February 23, 2006, 12:17:01 PM »
A 1990 article from the Cincinnati Post


Emerys shared riches with city

By Barry M. Horstman, Post staff reporter

When the University of Cincinnati honored John J. Emery in 1975 for a lifetime of civic and philanthropic contributions, he was likened to the legendary English architect whose dozens of 17th- and 18th-century churches and other structures still dominate London's landscape.

''We can say of him as was said of Christopher Wren, 'If you would see his monument, look about you,' '' one speaker said of Emery.

That description accurately captures the civic ubiquity not only of Emery, but of generations of his family, whose business affairs, social activism and exceedingly generous charitable donations left an indelible imprint on nearly every facet of life in Cincinnati.

A modest candle-making company founded by Emery's grandfather in 1840 spawned a corporate empire that, by the mid-20th century, had become a global industrial-chemical giant. His forebears donated millions of dollars to build, expand - and, in some cases, save - institutions ranging from the Cincinnati Zoo and Children's Hospital to the UC College of Medicine and the Cincinnati Art Museum. His aunt, Mary Emery, became known as ''Cincinnati's Lady Bountiful'' for her charitable munificence, which included funding the development of Mariemont as a model town patterned after an English village.

John Emery himself gave the city some of its most enduring landmarks - notably, the 48-story Carew Tower, which still punctuates the skyline - and put his considerable clout behind the mid-century redevelopment of downtown Cincinnati. As one of the founders and president of the Charter Committee, he helped reform city government. And over nearly a half century, Emery - for years, referred to as ''Cincinnati's biggest taxpayer'' - continued one of his aunt's most cherished projects, lifting the Art Museum from parochial mediocrity to national prominence by serving as its longtime president, chairman and perpetual benefactor.

The local history of one of Cincinnati's most significant families began with Thomas Emery, who in the early 1830s left his job in a London bank to come to America. After drifting westward from Connecticut to Kentucky over several years, he finally settled in Cincinnati in his mid-30s, where he opened a real estate and money agent office on Fourth Street.

The Panic of 1837 scuttled that business, but Emery rebounded by manufacturing candles, building a company around something no one else wanted - the abundant fat and oil byproducts of Cincinnati's meat-packing plants. Emery, who initially sold his candles door-to-door in his buggy, saw his sales soar when he improved on the tallow candles of the day by developing dripless stearic acid candles, which burned longer and held their shape better.

He plowed most of his profits into buying land, a strategy that his three sons continued after their father was killed when he fell down a hatchway at his downtown factory in 1857. By the early 1900s, the Emery estate was estimated to be the largest west of New York.

Beginning in the late 1880s, the Emerys built the first modern apartments in Cincinnati - four- and five-room ''French flats'' in downtown that offered private bathrooms and kitchens, not simply sleeping quarters, as was then the norm. Future President William Howard Taft, in his bachelor days, lived in one of the Emerys' buildings on Fourth Street, the Lombardy.When Mary Emery's husband, one of Thomas Emery's sons, died in 1906, he left his $20 million share of the family estate to her with no strings attached. Having no direct descendants, she spent the final 21 years of her life dispensing millions to innumerable causes - and still managed to leave nearly the amount she had inherited in a $20 million trust fund to oversee her commitments when she died.

In 1916, she and Mrs. Charles P. Taft each donated $125,000 to save the Cincinnati Zoo, buying it from a transit company that could no longer afford to operate it. She funded construction of Children's Hospital, orphanages, churches and recreational facilities; helped form the Summer Opera, and built the Emery Auditorium, which housed the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra from 1912-1936. The UC College of Medicine gained a new building and an endowed chair thanks to Mrs. Emery. And in her will, she left paintings valued at $3.5 million to the Art Museum.

Her crowning achievement, though, was Mariemont - the first subdivision of its kind in Cincinnati and one hailed as a ''national exemplar.''

After buying up 423 acres in the early 1920s, she commissioned a nationally recognized town planner to create a community of about 5,000 drawn from ''a wide range of families of different economic degrees (who) would prefer not to live 'under the shadow of the factory' so long as they are not too far from their work.'' Most homes were to be modestly priced, and the community was to be a self-contained suburban enclave with parks, recreational facilities and a farm; a shopping district with stores, a theater and an inn; small police and fire stations, and a town hall, school, church, hospital and library.

Although Mariemont fell short of some goals - higher construction costs raised its lowest rents to nearly 50 percent above the citywide average - it drew effusive praise from housing reformers and urban planners. Its underground electrical and telephone wiring - an aesthetic choice that eliminated unsightly poles and wires - remains innovative even by contemporary standards.

Several years before his aunt's death, John Emery moved from his native New York to Cincinnati in 1924, anticipating a relatively brief stay to oversee the family's diverse interests. Instead, Emery - educated at Harvard and Oxford universities - remained here the rest of his life, eventually becoming the family's most visible member.

While extending the Emerys' real estate holdings, he piloted Emery Industries Inc. - the outgrowth of the old candle company - through decades of steady expansion, making it one of the nation's top producers of fatty acids and chemicals used in rubber, leather, dyes, paints and a wide range of other products. At the time of his death, the firm - which two years later was merged into the National Distillers and Chemical Corp. - had annual sales of $193 million.

An unrelenting advocate of downtown redevelopment, Emery was responsible for the $30 million Carew Tower - a smaller-scale model of New York's Rockefeller Center that has topped the city's skyline since 1930. He also built the Terrace Hilton (now the Crowne Plaza) and the stately 28-story, 800-room Netherland Plaza, which at its 1931 opening was rhapsodically described in newspapers as rivaling the ''splendors of Solomon's Temple.''

Some of Emery's ideas helped shape downtown's modern face, including his early calls for a convention center, hotels and apartments precisely where they were later built. As early as the 1950s, he warned that development of the central riverfront was long overdue.

While Emery's daring risk-taking and sense of noblesse oblige were remaking his adopted city, his sister, Audrey, kept Cincinnatians enthralled by cutting a spectacular swath through international society in the '20s and '30s.

Voted one of America's 10 most beautiful women, she twice married into Russian nobility - once to Grand Duke Dmitri Pavlovich, the cousin of Russia's last czar, Nicholas. Later, in the weeks before Grace Kelly married Prince Rainier of Monaco, papers were filled with stories hinting that Audrey - by then Princess Ilynski, a courtesy title from her marriage to the grand duke - might beat them to the altar by marrying Rainier's father. But, from her Palm Beach home, she assured Cincinnatians that she and Prince Pierre were just old friends.

When John Emery died at 78 in 1976, closed-circuit television was brought in for the overflow attendance at his Indian Hill funeral.

A newspaper story from years before provided a fitting eulogy. ''Cincinnati would not seem normal,'' it said, ''if there was not an Emery around doing something for the town.'' The lasting gifts from John, Mary and other Emerys assure that there always will be.

Publication date: 08-09-99

David_Pritchard

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #140 on: February 23, 2006, 12:38:59 PM »
From the Manalapan News:

IS THERE A GHOST IN CASA ALVA?

By William E. Benjamin II

My mother’s family comes from Raynam Hall in Norfolk which is one of the most famous haunted houses in all of England. I spent my youthful summers in Hyde Hall, Cooperstown, New York which was a stately,although decaying Georgian mansion circa 1800 with trap doors and tunnels leading to the family crypts and also well documented ghostly activity. After buying our 1840 house in Coastal Maine we discovered that it had a well known local reputation for the ghosts of a displaced Indian and also a long ago sea captain. My wife’s sister, who is into such things, came from California and exorcised the ghostsafter settling their troubled memories. In Casa Alva, our lovely and cheery home in Manalapan, my wife says that she is often aware of a ghostly woman standing quietly and observing her. Our housekeeper, who comes from Down East Maine, is equally cer-tain that there are other worldly presences that occupy the mansion. I also remember, the mother of my old friend, Paulie Ilyinsky, Mrs. Audrey Emery telling me that many years ago when she was staying as a guest in the house in the 1930’s she clearly remembered passing a ladyin a dressing gown coming down the stairs in the latenight darkness. At breakfast she was told that there were no other female guests staying in the house. Perhaps I am less perceptive or imaginative than these ladies, but I have never felt another worldly pres-ence in Casa Alva and indeed, have always found an amiable and welcoming air in its many halls and roomsand even the endless cellars. If there is a ghost, perhaps itarrived with one of the many rooms of 18th Century decorative boiseries that Madame Balsan had stripped from great estates in France and England and re-erected in what were then the wilds of Florida. Maybe the ghosts miss their faraway old homes. Wouldn’t you?


N.B. Manalapan is the small municipality just south of the Town of Palm Beach sharing the same barrier island.

Offline Prince_Christopher

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #141 on: February 23, 2006, 09:23:41 PM »

Audrey and Dmitri

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Offline Rachael89

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #142 on: February 26, 2006, 11:38:30 AM »
Here's a scan of Audrey from Camera and the Tsars (it's a very bad scan!):

http://photobucket.com/albums/c124/Rachael89/?action=view&current=75.jpg

Rachael
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Offline imperial angel

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #143 on: February 28, 2006, 09:58:51 AM »
I had never seen that photo, although I was thinking of buying that book soon. It's very nice!

Offline Rachael89

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #144 on: February 28, 2006, 12:51:34 PM »
Glad to help, it's a wonderful book, my favourite on the Romanovs. Some of the photos in it are spectacular and the writing is also fascinating.

Rachael
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Offline Tatyana

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #145 on: February 28, 2006, 08:38:20 PM »
My late mother-in-law was Jack Emery's second wife -- they were in love all their lives, but her family wouldn't let her marry him originally because they considered him "fast".
Her recollection of Audrey was that she was very fast: my mother-in-law said that she snapped her garters at men regularly!  :o  ::)

TATYANA

Offline imperial angel

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #146 on: March 01, 2006, 08:35:16 AM »
I can believe she was. Grand Duke Paul was regarded that way in Russia before the revolution, athough later he was a bit more subdued.

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #147 on: March 01, 2006, 09:22:13 AM »
engaged



married



with son Paul

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Offline dp5486

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #148 on: March 02, 2006, 05:49:20 PM »
Does anyone by chance know who accompanied Dmitri into exile at the Persian front? I know an ADC of Nicholas's, Count Konstantin Pavlovich Kutaisov did.

Thanks!

Offline LisaDavidson

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Re: Grand Duke Dmitriy Pavlovitch, his wife Audrey Emery, and descendants
« Reply #149 on: March 02, 2006, 11:49:15 PM »
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Does anyone by chance know who accompanied Dmitri into exile at the Persian front? I know an ADC of Nicholas's, Count Konstantin Pavlovich Kutaisov did.

Thanks!


Dmitri's ADC, named Kasterine, accompanied him. I have been in contact with Kasterine's son, who was named Dmitri in honor of the Grand Duke. I don't know who else.