Author Topic: Maria and Nicholas Demenkov  (Read 104542 times)

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Offline clockworkgirl21

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Re: Maria and Nicholas Demenkov
« Reply #300 on: December 01, 2016, 09:29:38 PM »
I'm terrible at translating things as I don't speak Russian, but reading it over he talked about how they encountered a Battleship in Sevastopol named Breslau. The Empress Maria (the ship Demenkov was on) fired first but the battleship was far enough away that it escaped. Later that same day they were attacked by a submarine and they attacked it back (I think?).

Then he says he met with the former commander of his regiment named General Komarov. He uses the word "treated" (at least that's how it was translated) so maybe Komarov had been hospitalized?

I'd love to see if someone is comfortable enough to actually try to translate it word for word.

Offline Превед

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Re: Maria and Nicholas Demenkov
« Reply #301 on: December 02, 2016, 07:52:05 AM »
Then he says he met with the former commander of his regiment named General Komarov. He uses the word "treated" (at least that's how it was translated) so maybe Komarov had been hospitalized?

Yes, seems like that:
В Севастополе = In Sevastopol
сейчас = now
лечится = being treated / healed (лечиться [lʲɪˈʨiʦə] is the passive form of лечить [lʲɪˈt͡ɕitʲ], heal, from Proto-Slavic *lěkъ and still current лекарь, doctor, cognate with Scandinavian lege / lge / lka / lkare, heal and doctor and Anglo-Saxon lce, a word which has been lost in English.)
бывший = former
командир = commander
нашего полка= of our regiment
Генерал Комаров = General Komarov.

One might perhaps be puzzled that the infintive and third person singular present of лечиться seem to be the same, and without accent marks they look the same, although the pronunciation differs in terms of stress:
лечи́ться - infinitive - to be healed - stress on the second syllable (and the unstressed e in the first syllable reduced to an ɪ-sound).
ле́чится - third person singular present - is being healed - stress on the first syllable.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2016, 08:23:30 AM by Превед »
Березы севера мне милы,
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: Ивы и березы, 1843 / 1856)

Offline Превед

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Re: Maria and Nicholas Demenkov
« Reply #302 on: December 02, 2016, 09:47:33 AM »
One might perhaps be puzzled that the infintive and third person singular present of лечиться seem to be the same....

Well, almost the same, I see now:
In the infintive лечиться there is of course a soft sign (ь), like in all active infinitive endings (-ть) with the passive suffix -ся stacked on, something which is lacking in the finite form лечится, but as far as I can see it doesn't effect pronunication, it's only etymological.

Березы севера мне милы,
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: Ивы и березы, 1843 / 1856)