Author Topic: Tatiana Anecdotes  (Read 51832 times)

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Offline Belochka

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Re: Tatiana Anecdotes
« Reply #90 on: May 13, 2014, 08:48:39 PM »
Do we have any way of knowing how much more education Alexei was being given in the subject than his sisters? Obviously from the standpoint of his (delusional) parents he would have probably had a number of years before needing to be versed in the intricacies of currency and economics, but certainly the Tsarevich should at least know the price of a gallon of milk, so to speak...yes?

Alexei Nicholaevich was, according to the most sources, bad pupil. He had been given classes of Artimethics, History, Geography, French and English. One of the main reasons for his bad marks was his illness. By 1916, he poorly multiplied two numbers. So the math wasn't his greater side. I think that he just didn't get a chance for proper education. And he was too young. So I highly doubt that he might got an idea on economics or prices. It is well known that Olga had most interest in her country and political situaion at that time. I even wonder how Nicholas II were aware of Russian's economic at age 12? Despte all that, Alexei Nicholaievich was adored by all the people that met him. And that it what matters, IMO.  

No "edubs31".

Why should the Tsesarevich have been made aware about milk and bread prices?  

Turning the question back to you, were you aware of the prices of these two items when you were 12 or so?

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Offline edubs31

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Re: Tatiana Anecdotes
« Reply #91 on: May 13, 2014, 11:45:06 PM »
Do we have any way of knowing how much more education Alexei was being given in the subject than his sisters? Obviously from the standpoint of his (delusional) parents he would have probably had a number of years before needing to be versed in the intricacies of currency and economics, but certainly the Tsarevich should at least know the price of a gallon of milk, so to speak...yes?

Alexei Nicholaevich was, according to the most sources, bad pupil. He had been given classes of Artimethics, History, Geography, French and English. One of the main reasons for his bad marks was his illness. By 1916, he poorly multiplied two numbers. So the math wasn't his greater side. I think that he just didn't get a chance for proper education. And he was too young. So I highly doubt that he might got an idea on economics or prices. It is well known that Olga had most interest in her country and political situaion at that time. I even wonder how Nicholas II were aware of Russian's economic at age 12? Despte all that, Alexei Nicholaievich was adored by all the people that met him. And that it what matters, IMO.  

No "edubs31".

Why should the Tsesarevich have been made aware about milk and bread prices?  

Turning the question back to you, were you aware of the prices of these two items when you were 12 or so?

Margarita


Taking things literally, I suppose knowing that the price of a gallon of milk is $3.50 isn't very relevant for a twelve year old. But I was using that more as a 'common sense' example. Had Alexei believed that the price of a gallon of milk was $10,000 we might have ourselves some issues.

I don't know what would be deemed "relevant" education for the heir to the Russian throne. I know that Alexander III made a terrible mistake by keeping Nicholas under developed for so long, and that Alexei's own education, as Nena points out, was stymied by the constant medical care he required.

By the way, do you think Alexei would ever have learned what the price of a milk & bread was? 12, 16, 26, 46-years of age? I have a suspicion his father never did, which helps to explain the disconnect he had from his subjects...the same subjects who eventually revolted and forced him into abdication.
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Offline Belochka

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Re: Tatiana Anecdotes
« Reply #92 on: May 14, 2014, 02:40:52 AM »

I know that Alexander III made a terrible mistake by keeping Nicholas under developed for so long, and that Alexei's own education, as Nena points out, was stymied by the constant medical care he required.


I agree with your statement.


By the way, do you think Alexei would ever have learned what the price of a milk & bread was? 12, 16, 26, 46-years of age? I have a suspicion his father never did, which helps to explain the disconnect he had from his subjects...the same subjects who eventually revolted and forced him into abdication.

I doubt that Alexei (as a teenager) would have ever learned what one kopek might have purchased. Beyond that age, your guess is as good as mine.


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Offline TimM

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Re: Tatiana Anecdotes
« Reply #93 on: May 15, 2014, 12:12:28 PM »
I enjoy reading Tatiana anecdotes.   Anyone got more?

Offline Olga Maria

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Re: Tatiana Anecdotes
« Reply #94 on: April 18, 2015, 01:26:08 PM »
There's one from the book Romanov Sisters (by Helen Rappaport) and I'm posting from memory so it wouldn't be a verbatim copy from the original at the book ::

She and Tatiana Botkina were playing jumping rope then and she was wearing her wig. Unfortunately, while playing, her wig fell. Tatiana felt mortified by it because there were guards around them who saw her! According to Botkina (the source of this anecdote), her hair was still growing (unevenly) that time. Self-conscious as she was, she wouldn't like being seen with such a 'hairstyle'. So immediately, Tatiana picked up her wig, wore it, ran away to the palace and didn't go out the rest of that day.

I'm most sure that's the 'only time' she ever blushed!!

Please someone correct me if I reworded exaggeratedly. I remember that anecdote that way~
« Last Edit: April 18, 2015, 01:39:39 PM by Shandroise de Laeken »

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Offline clockworkgirl21

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Re: Tatiana Anecdotes
« Reply #95 on: April 18, 2015, 01:52:43 PM »
I remember that anecdote, but I can't remember if it happened in 1913 (which would have been in front of the IF's own guard) or in 1918.

Offline Olga Maria

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Re: Tatiana Anecdotes
« Reply #96 on: April 18, 2015, 02:38:55 PM »
It happened in 1913 because I remember reading it in the first half of that book, hehehe ^^

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Offline Kassafrass

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Re: Tatiana Anecdotes
« Reply #97 on: April 18, 2015, 07:07:12 PM »
Did Tatiana have a wig in captivity?
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Offline Olga Maria

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Re: Tatiana Anecdotes
« Reply #98 on: April 19, 2015, 12:44:06 AM »

None, as far as I know. After their measles' attack, she wasn't ashamed anymore of her bald head because she and her sisters were all bald xD

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Offline Sarushka

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Re: Tatiana Anecdotes
« Reply #99 on: April 19, 2015, 07:49:46 AM »
From a prior thread:

Excerpt from a letter byTatiana Nikolaevna to Rita K
Tobolsk
27 February 1918

Our hair has grown, it is as long as in that picture after I had typhus, with the ribbon in it, do you remember?  It grows much quicker now because I think first we had our heads shaved twice and secondly we did not wear wigs so it was much more comfortable.  The first time I was ashamed of myself as I was all alone, but now we are all four in the same state!
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