Author Topic: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion  (Read 128901 times)

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Offline Tania+

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #45 on: September 13, 2005, 05:03:53 PM »
I'm proud to share, I'm baptised Russian Orthodox, as is my husband Armenian Orthodox and daughter. Our faith has seen us through many issues of life, [as it did our birth families] and we are ever grateful for holding on to our faith, and prayers, for all humankind, and ourselves.

Should you wish to gain more basic information on the subject of the Russian Orthodox faith, etc. I believe Elizabeth has already posted to share with you.

Posted by: Pravoslavnaya Posted on:
"Aug 27th, 2004, 10:00pm

Dear rskkiya:

My God-father recommended to me  The Orthodox Church and The Orthodox Way, both by Timothy Ware (now Fr. Kallistos), and The Law of God, by Fr. Seraphim Slobodsky.

God bless you!  I hope this helps.

Elizabeth"

In the Name and Blessings of God, for you and yours,
I remain most
Respectfully,

Tatiana [Tania]
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Offline matushka

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #46 on: September 22, 2005, 04:41:57 PM »
rskkiya,
I do not know do you know some other ideas of books. Kalistos Ware is very good. Very basic is also "The Mystery of the faith" by bishop Hilarion (Alfeyev). NOt basic, but really interesting and deep the book of Vladimir Lossky, but I do not know is there an english tranlation. As an orthodox believer, I would say that the best introduction (and this introduction can continue all the life!) to Orthodoxy are the orthodox church services. Attending to them, reading or listening to the text, praying with them help us going into the mystery of Christianity. Another very good introduction for people thinking about convert or not convert is trying to live something of the orthodox spiritual life: fasting, reading prayers and so on. Orthodoxy (I would say Christianism in general) is not a philosophy you agree with or not, but... something else, tranfiguring your life and... obliging you transform your life.
Sorry, quite difficult to explain in english for me!
I hope I shocked noone ;)

Offline Nastya

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #47 on: September 29, 2005, 09:00:29 PM »
you know how alexandra had to change her name when she changed to russina orthodoxy, well im 14 and my mom gave me a choice of my religion because i havent been baptised yet. and i was wondering would i have to change my name if i become a russian orthodox? and is ukranian orthodox the same as russian orthodox ? becuase thats what i have in town. and if i do have to change my name what would it change to ? my name is Aylenna!

Offline Georgiy

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #48 on: September 29, 2005, 09:34:28 PM »
Hi Aylenna,
I will try to answer your questions briefly. First, yes you would have to have a Baptismal, or Christian name. You would be named in honour of an Orthodox Saint, who is an intercessor in Heaven for you. Your Priest might select one who he feels may be suitable for you. A lot of converts, if their name is thta of an Orthodox Saint keep their given name, e.g: Grand Duchess Elizabeth Feodorovna when she became Orthodox took the name of St Elizabeth the Righteous, mother of St John the Forerunner and Baptist.

Going by your name, it might be nice to choose St Helen (in Russian Elena). She was the mother of St Constantine the Great, who converted the Roman Empire to Christianity. St Helen was very pious and devout, and went to Jerusalem and among other things, discovered the Cross that Christ was crucified on. In fact just last week we had the Feast of the Elevation of the Cross which commemorates that event.

Next. You ask is the Ukrainian Orthodox Church the same as the Russian Orthodox Church. Yes. The Orthodox Church is the Orthodox Church wherever you go. There are Greek, Serbian, Arabian, Japanese, Romanian, Bulgarian Orthodox Churches and many others beside, which all share the same beliefs, doctrine etc. HOwever, you need to be sure it is a Canonical Orthodox Church. In the Ukraine itself, there has been a breakaway group which has a self-proclaimed Patriarch. That particular church, whilst calling itself Orthodox, is orthodox in name only as it has severed itself and is uncanonical. Find out if the Ukrainian Church in your town is under the Moscow Patriarchate. If it is a 'Unia' Church, then it is not Orthodox at all, but Roman Catholic, but retaining Orthodox forms of liturgical worship.

Finally, please, please, please do a lot of soul-searching and read as much as you can about the Orthodox Church before you get baptised. In some ways it is better not to have become Orthodox than to end up throwing the gift of Orthodoxy away at a later age. Orthodoxy is serious Christianity. There is rigorous fasting for extended periods of the year. We have Confession where you examine your soul and all your actions minutely, but the Kingdom of Heaven is taken by the forceful. It is not the 'I'm baptised and Orthodox now, so I am saved!' type of Faith. It is serious and hard work. Through our lives here we attain our salvation, but everyday is a struggle to cleanse ourselves and to fight for the salvation of our souls against those that war against us (and not only the demons on their own, but devils working through other people.)

Orthodoxy is a beautiful, intensely spiritual Faith, and like anything worth attaining you have to work hard for it, but the 'rewards' are well worth the struggle. I recommend you look at the articles on the www.fatheralexander.org website.

Offline Tania+

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #49 on: October 27, 2005, 01:32:14 PM »
Were the crosses worn by their IF members, a cross that is designed as crosses of that depicted as the Orthodox cross ?

I don't think I have ever seen any picture of any IF family member with their cross visible. Is there a picture available as such?

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Offline Georgiy

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #50 on: October 27, 2005, 03:26:34 PM »
I would imagine that even if the outer shape was that of (say) the Byzantine cross, the carving (for want of the correct word) showing the crucified Christ would have Him on a Russian Style cross, with the usual inscriptions and the skull of Adam under the Cross. My Baptismal Cross is shaped Russian Style, but I have another one in Byzantine style, but the cross thereon is Russian style.

Offline Azarias

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #51 on: December 04, 2005, 05:40:28 PM »
No. There is no basis or precedent, and it's likely to never happen.
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Offline Azarias

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #52 on: December 05, 2005, 01:23:49 PM »
Quote
No. There is no basis or precedent, and it's likely to never happen.


Very sorry... it seems my answer fell out of sequence in things. I was referring to the question of women priests.

This is in no way to be taken as an offense to women. Certainly the Orthodox do respect women. The Virgin Theotokos holds a position of the highest esteem. The question of women priests is not about equality of the sexes or keeping any one down. St. Mary Magdalen has been given the title "equal-to-the Apostles" a rare honorific for the Orthodox.

The question has more to do with the mystical differeces between the sexes, their respective natures, and the way in which they both function in the worlds - not just the physical.

Perhaps it should also be pointed out that a priest who looses his right hand can no longer function. I point this out to show that there can be restrictions on men as well, but it is much more than a question of body parts. Although there is no official ruling that I am aware of I would think that a transgendered F to M would also be unacceptable. Again, it is not a question of body parts but of higher mystical nature.

I hope I am not opening up a can of worms.
"My! People come and go so quickly here!" - Dorothy, The Wizard of Oz

Offline Tania+

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #53 on: December 05, 2005, 02:40:21 PM »
Why should it 'open a can of worms' to state anything of what is a requirement anywhere? It has been this way for thousands of years, at least for the Russian Orthodox Church and nothing seems contrary to have changed 'what is'. It's just a fact of life. If you don't believe, you don't believe. That's that !

Those of us, who are inclined to be fully involved in that of the Church's doctrine, follow it day in, day out. Those who do not, go where they feel most comfortable. Many faiths have church law and that's the way their faith is followed. It's the same with the Dali Lama, sorry, Buddhists, Mormons, Catholics, Coptics, Greek Orthodox, etc.

But there's only one God, imho...


Tatiana
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Offline Azarias

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #54 on: December 05, 2005, 03:07:25 PM »
Many thanks for that posting Tatiana. I was hoping that my posting would be followed by the opinions of an Orthodox woman. You are entirely correct in what you say.

On a subject like women priests it would be too easy for me to get beaten up by the ladies. It's not as if anything discussed here will change the policies or theology of the church anyway. It is not about putting any one down or making converts.

I only hope to shed some light on the forum as to the Orthodox Church in the hope that it makes for a larger understanding of all things Russian. That is the purpose of this discussion board, isn't it?  :)
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Offline matushka

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #55 on: December 06, 2005, 03:33:01 PM »
Azarias, you are certainly right and an other orthodox woman will here support your opinion!!
I would like to add that being a priest is not a right, as some western women want us to believe. Being a priest is a service and the Church call some of her member for it. For others services the Church call other members, men or women. Let us remember the apostol Paul, about all the way one can serve in the church, according to his talents and vocation.
As said Tania, it has always been that way. This argument is not so stupid as it sounds: it is the tradition, the Holy tradition which is the old and wise experience of hundreds of christian before us about this central question: will we saved and how is that better to do to be saved, as we have part to our salvation.

Offline Marlene

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #56 on: December 09, 2005, 10:15:58 AM »
As a cradle Lutheran, I can assure that Lutherans - like Roman Catholics and Orthodox - which follows very much the same liturgy -- do not believe that Christmas is more important than Easter.   Easter is the most important of holy days.  

Quote
Thank you isekenderbey. You, orthodox believers are really great! I like very uch the way you explain your faith, to people who knew anything about it...Like me.  ;D I understand every day more about Orthodoxy, and certainly, I'm very tempted to be one of yours.  ::) But, of course, I must think very carefully about it.

   As for catholics , I think that Easter is also the more important celebration in our church as it is in all christian churches, but Western believers are now, very far from their religious concivtions, and it's just for that, that some people seems to believe that Christmas is more important than Easter. As television in Christmas time speaks all time about purchasing things and EAT; EAT; EAT, DRINK-DRINK-DRINK  ;D, people got influenced and simply purchases gifts, eats and drinks, rather than go to the church and so...I certainly goes to the church in Christmas and always said to my family and friends that it is a RELIGIOUS celebration and not a profane one. I love to prepara delicious meals myself this beatiful night, but not for the simply fact of eating, but to show to my family, my deep love to them. Some people confounds Christmas Eve with the New Year's night, and just got a great party to enjoy themselves...Bad enough.  >:( :-/ But be sure, not al catholic people acts like this.

   As for my brother, he became a protestant lutheran after marrying a german girl, and they are much more religious in Easter and Christmas than we catholics uses to be.

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Offline Azarias

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #57 on: December 10, 2005, 05:13:27 PM »
Thank you Marlene.

For the Orthodox if it were not for Pascha (Easter) there would be no point to all the rest.
"My! People come and go so quickly here!" - Dorothy, The Wizard of Oz

Offline Gud_bevare_Tsaren

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #58 on: December 11, 2005, 02:03:21 PM »
Religion is an interesting thing especially when it comes to Russia since the Russian Orthodox Church suffered so badly. Lenin and Stalin sure did their best to annihilate christianity even if they didn't destroy it completely, afraid as they were that it would cause a reaction that not even the mighty KGB would be able to control.

In 1990, only 20% of the russians considered themselves as religious. In 1992, they were 52%. Amazing and a healthy sign. I wonder how it is today.

In my life christianity is very important. God and Family, nothing else matters.  :)

Offline matushka

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Re: Romanovs and Faith/Orthodox Religion
« Reply #59 on: December 11, 2005, 02:59:24 PM »
Yes, today more than 52 pro cent russian considered themseleves as believers. But only 4 pro cent of the population is regular church goer. Unfortunetly.
And, about the prosecutions, do you know, there is a very common opinion in the orthodox world: the prosecutions were the result of inside church problems, there were lots of saints and wonderfuls monasteries. There were also plenty of half-believers priest, bad nuns and monks, bishops looking only at carrier and politic. A lot of sins inside of the Church. There were plenty of deep believers. And also plenty of people who did not trust the Church any more. A lot of us, at the moment, see the prosecutions of Lenin and Stalin as something paradoxally coming from God. It made a sort of purification  and renaissance in the Church.