Author Topic: Imprisonment, Last Days & Death of Romanovs in 1918  (Read 44004 times)

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Offline imperial angel

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Re: Imprisonment, Last Days & Death of Romanovs in 1918
« Reply #135 on: November 07, 2006, 11:45:31 AM »
Yes, you are right otma and Alexei were not raised to be haughty, or anything. They were aware of their position, but at the same time they were not like some of the Vladmirvichi who were said to be very aware of their position, and haughty. The way otma was brought up wasn't to have their rank go to their heads, but to be aware of it, and use it for good, not bad.

Offline Ra-Ra-Rasputin

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Re: Imprisonment, Last Days & Death of Romanovs in 1918
« Reply #136 on: November 07, 2006, 12:00:18 PM »
Children usually realise their position in the world when they start school, as they begin friendships with other children and begin to understand that they are not the most important person in the world and that they share their existence with a lot of other people outside of the immediate family.

I would imagine in the case of the Romanov children that it was actually quite a slow realisation for them that they were different, as they had very little interaction with children outside of the family.  Understanding their own importance in a political sense would be something they would have had to have explained to them, as if all they ever saw was palaces and fancy clothes, they would never have understood that not everyone lived in the same way they did.  It was probably a rather organic process- them seeing things and asking questions and then gathering their difference from other people gradually.  For example, on their way to somewhere in a carriage, one of the children may have noticed some other children playing in the street, and asked why they couldn't do the same, etc.  Children are very perceptive of difference as they grow older, and so as they became more self aware, the questions would have come quite thick and fast.  The trouble is in ascertaining whether the children actually understood what it was to be Grand Duchesses and a Tsesarevich until they were quite old.  In a family where everyone has a title, it must be difficult to understand what significance that has in the wider world as a child. 

Does anyone have any concrete information on this, rather than just conjecture, as my post undoubtedly is??

Rachel
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Offline imperial angel

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Re: Imprisonment, Last Days & Death of Romanovs in 1918
« Reply #137 on: November 07, 2006, 12:38:34 PM »
Yes, it might have been slow. The world around them was a very opulent one, and although they were not raised to be haughty, it was natural for them to get used to a certain sitiuation and think that was all there was. But, they were very much raised in a quiet family way, and not in the grand way they could have been, although I can see them as children thinking that is all there was. They could easily have been much grander in upbringing, but their parents and the whole Romanov family tradition behind them was that it was not the way it was done. But most children tend to think their family's reality is the only reality for a long time.

Offline Tania+

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Re: Imprisonment, Last Days & Death of Romanovs in 1918
« Reply #138 on: November 07, 2006, 12:58:51 PM »
I recall reading that they dressed when home, in very ordinary dress, and they slept on army cots, so in this regard they were told I believe that they merited nothing special. I believe later in the lives of the now deceased Princess Grace Kelly's household, she once said that she wanted to raise her children similarly. She taught her children as well to make their own beds, clean up after themselves, and learn to be individualistic. I believe that the IF children were and continued to live their lives with dignity, and understanding about and around their environments. I think they were brought up in a christian environment, and the teachings of the church played a greater part in molding their personalities, etc.

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Offline imperial angel

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Re: Imprisonment, Last Days & Death of Romanovs in 1918
« Reply #139 on: November 07, 2006, 03:50:18 PM »
That seems true to me, and about sums it up. I hope for the person who asked this question, they have their answer. I am not sure of much for certain info on what Rachel posted, but there isn't that much indepth about otma in when they would have realized their rank. There is much about their childhoods in books though, and from this we can gather facts.

Offline Sunny

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Re: Imprisonment, Last Days & Death of Romanovs in 1918
« Reply #140 on: November 21, 2011, 06:09:56 AM »
I did not find a more suitable thread for my wuick answer, but since it's quick, i saw no need to open a whole thread. if it's not the right place, i hope a mod will move the post.
I was wondering: who took the place of Pankratov when he was dismissed in January 1918? Alix recorded the dismissing in her diary, but i couldn't find anywhere who took his place.
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Offline Kalafrana

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Re: Imprisonment, Last Days & Death of Romanovs in 1918
« Reply #141 on: November 21, 2011, 07:32:09 AM »
'In a family where everyone has a title, it must be difficult to understand what significance that has in the wider world as a child.' 

I remmember distinctly a documentary about harems which featured an interview with an elderly Ottoman prince (if I remember correctly a son of the last reigning Turkish Sultan). In traditional Ottoman fashion he was brought up in his father's harem, and declared that until he was about eight or nine he thought everybody grew up in a harem!

Ann


Offline carkuczyn

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Re: Imprisonment, Last Days & Death of Romanovs in 1918
« Reply #142 on: November 11, 2019, 04:39:28 AM »
1. The reason the jewels were not found was that they were actually sewn into their corsets, so then when they tried to find out why the bullets were bouncin off them, they tore open the corsets to find the jewels.

2. I believe that they weren't mear jewels, but diamonds.


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Offline tenorsfan

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Re: Imprisonment, Last Days & Death of Romanovs in 1918
« Reply #143 on: November 17, 2019, 02:00:13 PM »
I can't believe how people accept that narrative of the bullets bouncing off the corsets and not killing the girls more quickly and more humanely. What percentage of the bullets would have hit one of the stones and bounced off? More likely a bullet would have bypassed a stone or smashed it and continued on or pushed the stone into the body. Seems like common sense to me. I've never handled a diamond but you can break emeralds and sapphires easily with a hammer. That's how you mine them. More lies from the killers, methinks.