Author Topic: Stalin Statue 'Due to Go To Yalta'  (Read 5003 times)

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Offline Belochka

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Re: Stalin Statue 'Due to Go To Yalta'
« Reply #15 on: February 28, 2005, 07:36:42 PM »
Quote
That cathedral in the background of the second picture, isn't that the cathedral (I forget the name now) that Stalin destroyed by blowing up, and that was recently rebuilt to look exactly like the original?



Yes it certainly is Helen,

Alexander I intended to build the Cathedral to commemorate Russia's victory over Napoleon in 1812. Due to lack of funding and alleged fraud issues, the project ceased at Vorobyovy (Sparrow) Hills. Nikolai I resurrected the project, at the present site on the Moscow River, by appointing Konstantin Ton as the architect. It was built in 1839-80.

In 1931, Stalin in his demented wisdom, had the Catheral blown up, so that a Palace of Soviets with a huge 325 ft high statue of Lenin adorning its apex, could be constructed. It was to rival the American Empire State building. Construction commenced in 1937, but due to significant problems in engineering and with the outbreak of WWII work ceased. Fortunately the idea was never realized again. Instead a swimming pool was constructed in 1958, which also had its own construction problems.

In 1994 the old cathedral ground was reconsecrated by the Orthodox Church and a similar designed building (not a replica) was constructed in time for Moscow's 850th Anniversary in 1997.

It is called Cathedral of Christ the Savior Khram Khrista Spasitelya
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Belochka »


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Offline James_Davidov

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Re: Stalin Statue 'Due to Go To Yalta'
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2005, 06:44:15 AM »
LOL - I kinda like it!  I'd love it if i was like 6, its so Peter Pan!

But then again i guess its not very appropriate for a European city...or any, cause its very big and chunky and unusual.

But hey, new things are often recieved badly...maybe in a couple of hundred years the world will hail it!!

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Offline tobik

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Re: Stalin Statue 'Due to Go To Yalta'
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2005, 08:31:22 AM »
Just a quick update on the Stalin Statue.        

There have been increasing calls for statues of Stalin to be erected in Russia in recent times, though as yet none have been erected.  

Apart from a few mosaic images in the Moscow metro, there are no statues of Stalin in Russia, (as far as I am aware) though there is indeed a statue of Stalin at his birthplace in Gori, Georgia.  

The 'Stalin' Zurab Tsereteli statue is of Roosevelt, Stalin and Churchill and is not in fact too bad.  Compared at least with Peter the Great... Anyway in the words of Tsereteli the monument is not about Stalin per se but about an important historical event - i.e. the Yalta Conference.   It's due to go up in before the May 9th celebrations.

Tsereteli is Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov's pet artist, responsible for many of the recent Moscow eye sores, from the glitzy Okhotny Ryad shopping centre to the painfully awful Pushkin monument on Bolshaya Nikitskaya.  In his defence however, I would say that he's a great, convivial chap and a much better painter than sculptor.

Offline tobik

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Re: Stalin Statue 'Due to Go To Yalta'
« Reply #18 on: April 26, 2005, 02:51:00 PM »
A further follow up on this subject and a moral dilemma.

I saw the Tsereteli statue in the flesh this evening and was actually quite impressed with it.  Churchill's humour is especially well depicted, and while Roosevelt is perhaps a little stiff, Stalin is depicted in what can only be described as an evil manner.

The statue is no longer going to Yalta (they refused it) but possibly to Volgograd, though this is yet to be confirmed.  In any case this is not the issue - the issue is that an evil dictator responsible for the deaths of millions is now being comemmorated in a supposedly democratic country.

The issue of whether to display the statue should be a black and white one, but I have to confess to wavering a little.  Tsereteli said that the he sculpted Stalin in order to depict a historical event.  'What could I do, he joked this evening, 'leave Stalin's chair empty and call the sculpture, 'Waiting for Stalin!.''  

While Tsereteli avoids dealing with the moral issues in his answer, this commission was clearly not something he took on lightly - especially given that his own grandfather was killed in the purges in 1937.  Tsereteli is no neo-Stalinite and indeed he said that because of this family history he found it especially hard to depict Stalin.  Everytime he saw Stalin's eyes he could only think of his distraught grandmother.

Our appreciation of the past changes as the years progress, and while I pray for all eterniity that Stalin's crimes are not forgotten, I do think that our understanding of Stalin will eventually change to give a less hyperbolic assesment of his impact on the twentieth century, and will end up taking more account of his industrialisation of Russia and (accidental or otherwise) role as an Ally during the war.

It is this role as an Ally that the statue commemorates.  As Tsereteli said, this statue records a historical fact - i.e. the Big Three meeting in Yalta.  Stalin is there not because of  his virtues (or sins) but because he was head of the Russian nation at the time and consequently participated in that meeting.

I believe it would be equally dangerous to try and deny that Stalin (who is still seen, due to excellent propaganda after the war, as responsible for leading the Russians to victory) ever existed, or indeed was ever seen as an inspirational leader, as it would to commemorate his sins.

The issue of depicting Stalin is therefore less straightforward (in this case at least) than it appears, and I would be interested in knowing your opinions.  I for one find myself rather against my will, in favour of the statue.

Offline etonexile

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Re: Stalin Statue 'Due to Go To Yalta'
« Reply #19 on: May 09, 2005, 10:48:00 PM »
Any statue of Uncle Joe today... ::)

Might it have the said 'sainted chap' crushing millions under his heel...a bit of "Hyper-Realism"?...no...I doubt that would make for salable t-shirts and key chains....