Author Topic: The Byzantine Empire  (Read 78221 times)

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Offline palimpsest

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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #90 on: December 22, 2005, 10:32:51 PM »


A Christian Palestinian lights candles inside the Church of the Nativity, traditionally believed to be the birthplace of Jesus Christ, in the West Bank town of Bethlehem, Thursday, Dec. 22, 2005. Israeli authorities will ease access to Bethlehem during Christmas in a "calculated risk" meant to let Christian pilgrims celebrate the holiday freely in the West Bank town, security officials said. (AP Photo/Kevin Frayer)


The Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem is one of the oldest continuously operating churches in the world. The original structure was built by Bishop Makarios of Jerusalem at the direction of Constantine I of the Roman Empire following the First Council of Nicaea in 325. That structure was burnt down in the Samaritan revolt of 529.

It is administered by a coalition of Roman Catholic and Greek Orthodox clerics. Tradition has it that the church was built over Jesus' birthplace, and it is held as sacred by followers of Christianity and Islam.

It is actually a combination of two churches, with a crypt, the Grotto of the Nativity, where Jesus is said to have been born:

The main section (the basilica) now being controlled by the Greek Orthodox. It is designed like a generic Roman basilica, with three aisles and an apse. It featured golden mosaics covering the side walls, now largely decayed, and a Roman style floor (since covered over). It also features a large iconstasis, and a complex array of lamps throughout the entire church.
The adjoining Roman Catholic church, which is done in a more modern Gothic revival style, and has since been further modernized according to the liturgical trends after Vatican II.
The underground cave, which features the altar over the place Jesus is said to have been born. The exact spot is marked by a hole in the middle of a silver star, surrounded by silver lamps. This altar is neutral although it features primarily Armenian Orthodox design.



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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #91 on: December 31, 2005, 10:31:21 AM »


A Byzantine-era water jug from the Andritsa Cave in southern Greece is displayed with other pottery finds at the Byzantine and Christian museum in Athens on Monday, Oct. 10, 2005. Archaeologists excavating the cave discovered the remains of at least 33 people, mostly young adults and children, who were trapped there in the 6th Century while seeking refuge from an unknown threat. The cave retained its dark secret until it was accidentally discovered in 2004. (AP Photo/Kostas Tsironis)
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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #92 on: December 31, 2005, 10:52:59 AM »


Yachts, with the Ottoman era Blue mosque, left, and Byzantine monument of St. Sophia, right, in the background, set sail on Istanbul's Bosporus, in Turkey, Friday, July 15, 2005, at the start of the 34th Navy Cup. Some 65 yachts will compete between July 15-23, 2005 from Istanbul's Bosporus to the Turkish resort of Cesme on the Aegean coast for the Turkey's most prestigious yacht race. (AP Photo/Murad Sezer)



Local and foreign tourists visit the Byzantine era monument of St. Sophia in Istanbul, Turkey, Sept. 28, 2004. An estimated 22 million tourists will visit Turkey in 2005, a 25 percent increase over last year's record numbers, figures from the Ministry of Culture and Tourism show. Around 55 percent of those visitors will come from the countries that Turkey is hoping to join in the EU. (AP Photo/Murad Sezer)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by palimpsest »
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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #93 on: January 01, 2006, 06:51:42 PM »


This mosaic in Istanbul's Saint Sophia church depicts legendary Byzantine Empress Zoe. The mosaic and empress are among the art works and subjects featured in "Byzantium: The Lost Empire," a four-part documentary on the Learning Channel. (AP Photo/TLC)
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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #94 on: January 16, 2006, 09:09:47 AM »


A Byzantine lamp hangs in the center of the room surrounded by other artifacts on display during a preview of a new exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, "Byzantium: Faith and Power," at the museum in New York, Monday, March 15, 2004. The exhibit, which showcases more than 350 masterpieces of Byzantine art from some 30 nations, opens March 23. The hanging lamp dates from the 13th century and normally resides in the Monestary of Xeropotamou in Mount Athos, Greece. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #95 on: January 16, 2006, 09:19:01 AM »


A journalist and an Olympic Games volunteer look over various remnants varying from a water-supply system from the Ottoman period to Byzantine and Roman-period houses on display in the Metro station of Syntagma in Athens, Wednesday Aug. 11, 2004. History runs deep in Greece, and as Athens rushed to expand its subway system in time for the upcoming Olympics, work has been repeatedly halted by the discovery of ruins and artifacts. Officials have managed to find a golden lining: now some stations double as museums, with artifacts unearthed during construction displayed in glass case where they were found. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)
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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #96 on: January 16, 2006, 09:34:05 AM »
An interesting site and a good forum about The Roman Empire [including Byzantium]:

UNRV Roman History
http://www.unrv.com/

Ancient Roman Empire Forums > Roman History > Postilla Historia Romanorum
http://www.unrv.com/forum/index.php?showforum=18
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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #97 on: February 17, 2006, 09:35:53 AM »


This is part of the one-of-a-kind copy of a 2,300-year -old text by the ancient Greek scientist Archimedes as seen in this handout photo given by Christie 's Athens Thursday October 22, 1998. The portrait presumably an Evangelist was a later attempt to embellish the work. Christie's auction house said Monday Oct. 26,1998 they may call off this week's auction of the text because of ownership claims by Greek orthodox clerics . (AP Photo/Christie's/Copy: Lefteris Pitarakis)
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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #98 on: February 17, 2006, 09:37:27 AM »


This is part of the one-of-a-kind copy of a 2,300-year -old text by the ancient Greek scientist Archimedes as seen in this handout photo given by Christie 's Athens Thursday October 22, 1998. Christie's auction house said Monday Oct. 26,1998 they may call off this week's auction of the text because of ownership claims by Greek orthodox clerics. (AP Photo/Christie's/Copy: Lefteris Pitarakis)
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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #99 on: March 22, 2006, 03:27:23 PM »
Theotokos he Pammakaristos [The Mother-of-God the All-Blessed], and Christos ho Logos [Christ the Word] Fethiye Camii, Constantinople, 1310

The parekklesion, vaulting



« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by palimpsest »
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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #100 on: March 22, 2006, 03:28:10 PM »
Byzantine masonry at St. Sophia cathedral in Kiev [XI century]

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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #101 on: March 22, 2006, 03:30:44 PM »
San Marco again


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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #102 on: March 22, 2006, 03:31:50 PM »
Byzantine mosaics in Palermo, Sicily.

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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #103 on: March 22, 2006, 03:32:38 PM »
The main church of the Hosios Lukas [St. Luke] monastery, Greece

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Re: The Byzantine Empire
« Reply #104 on: March 22, 2006, 03:33:10 PM »
Church in Athens

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