Author Topic: Finnish "Royals"  (Read 19719 times)

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Offline Mie

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Re: Finnish "Royals"
« Reply #15 on: January 31, 2006, 08:39:04 AM »
I have to say something to this threat even it is so long anybody have write on it..  ;D I have some question. Doese anyone know picture about the crown which was made to the King Väinö  ;D (I have to mention about the name that when our history teacher mentioned it, whole class broke to laugh.. Väinö would not be that royal name to King.. :P at that time there was Väinö's and Matti's named people every home.. )

About the crown, there is a coby from the crown, I do not know where its position is, anybody who have more wisedom of that may tell me, couse I'd like to go and see it, but the real Thrown went miss. Noone knows where it is.. it would be really exaiting to wind it.. :P

And Tarja Halonen is now again our president and good president she is.

Finland kings have been also become from Aleksanteri I (which is known a freedom king or something like that.. good stuff he did though) to the Nikolai II (which is not know to be that good tsar)

Offline Mie

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Re: Finnish "Royals"
« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2006, 09:12:52 AM »
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I started a thread while ago in the 'Imperial Family' section on 'Europes Crowns'  someone helpful posted a great image of the unused Finnish crown jewels...Its kinda sad that they were never used.

James



May I ask where this section is? I tired to look for it but couldnt' manage

Offline QueenEna1887

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Re: Finnish "Royals"
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2006, 02:55:06 PM »
I read that Empress' Friedrich's youngest daughter Margerethe of Hesse-Cassel and her husband were elected to be King and Queen of Finland in 1918 when the Tsar and his wife lost the Grand Duchy of Finland and were executed. I read they were only the Finnish monarchs for two months and they abdicated. One of their twin sons were heir to the throne. What was supposed to be his finnish name? For instance, Prince Carl of Denmark became Haakon VII of Norway! I read their descendants are still trying to claim the throne.

Rebecca

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Re: Finnish "Royals"
« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2006, 03:30:52 PM »
I think I have read somewhere that his Finnish name would have been Fredrik Kaarle. I am not 100% sure of the spelling, though.  ???

Offline Katia

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Re: Finnish "Royals"
« Reply #19 on: February 24, 2006, 01:24:18 AM »
They decided to name Friedrich Karl something very traitionally finnish, he would have been Väinö I ... :P
Just speculations though, because he was never crowned...

Offline QueenEna1887

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Re: Finnish "Royals"
« Reply #20 on: February 24, 2006, 08:54:35 PM »
Very interesting! I read that the heir to the Finnish throne was Prince Wolfgang Moritz. I would like to know more.

Rebecca

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Re: Finnish "Royals"
« Reply #21 on: February 26, 2006, 02:00:14 PM »
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They decided to name Friedrich Karl something very traitionally finnish, he would have been Väinö I ... :P
Just speculations though, because he was never crowned...



Väinö I?! That's very...Finnish. ;) Anyway, I checked in an old book I have, Kungliga Eskapader och Kuriositeter by Lars Elgklou as I knew I had read somewhere that his name was going to be Fredrik Kaarle, and that's what Elgklou says. However, this book is not always reliable.  :-/ Thank you for the information! :)

By the way, Elgklou also says that Friedrich Karl actually never set foot in Finland. Is that true?  ???

Offline Katia

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Re: Finnish "Royals"
« Reply #22 on: February 27, 2006, 01:09:55 AM »
It's true that Friedrich Karl never reached Finland. His name as a king of Finland was mere speculation. He could have been Kaarle, Frederik Kaarle or even Väinö I, which always arouses hilarious feelings amongst Finnish people. (Väinö has been a very common and largely used name here before, but nowadays it is considered somewhat - funny... - However, it was quite a popular name again in 1990's, when a Finnish singer J. Karjalainen named his son Väinö and made a song where his name is repeated many times in refrain, and many male babies where named after that song. There has been a boom of other old Finnish names here as well.) -I've read that Friedrich Karl's son visited Finland during the II World War, and surely one of his descendants did during this century, he was Philipp of Hesse if I recall it right, a Finnish magazine invited him to show him the places and to speculate how it would be like if his ancestor would have been crowned. Our president Tarja Halonen once joked with Philipp, suggesting he could marry her daughter, and thus be a "prince of Finland"!

Katia

Naslednik Norvezhskiy

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Re: Finnish "Royals"
« Reply #23 on: March 06, 2010, 03:42:41 AM »
Design for a crown of a King of Finland on display at a gemstone museum in Northern Finland:


Note the arms of the Finnish provinces on the circlet. Some would say evidence of the fact that the design came from a school-master!

BTW I am fascinated by the title of King of Finland, because so little is known about Finnish history before the Swedes arrived on their conquering crusades. That the Finnish word for king, kuningas, just like Slavic knyaz, is derived from Proto-Norse kuningaR/kuningaz (modern konung/kung/konge), suggests that it was an alien concepts to the Finns, even though the Old Norse sagas tell of various petty Finnish kings in the coastal areas.

Titles: King of Finland and Karelia
Duke of the Åland Islands
Grand Duke of Lapland
Master of Kaleva and the North.
I do wonder if the last, most poëtical part of this suggested titulatory for a Finnish king, , was not just inspired by Kalevala and its Pohjola / Northland, but also by that part of the Emperor-Grand Duke's title which was всея Сѣверныя страны Повелитель: Lord of All Northern Territories.

For a северянин like me they are frightfully appealing, even though the times when these titles were topical were marked by pan-Finnish nationalism and expansionism also directed towards the Finnmark Province of my native Norway. (Though the Finn- element in Finnmark refers to the Sami people, not Finns, even though there has been a Finnish minority, the Kvens, in Finnmark since the 19th century.) King Haakon VII was for instance worried about Finnish designs on Finnmark, which in those days almost was like a sparsely populated Norwegian colony, his new biography revealed.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2010, 04:05:59 AM by Fyodor Petrovich »

Naslednik Norvezhskiy

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Re: Finnish "Royals"
« Reply #24 on: March 08, 2010, 08:18:19 PM »
That the Finnish word for king, kuningas, just like Slavic knyaz, is derived from Proto-Norse kuningaR/kuningaz (modern konung/kung/konge)

Oh, I just have to share this etymological goodie I just discovered with you possums!:

Finnish ruhtinas, prince, knyaz or furste, as in (Suomen) suurruhtinas, Grand Duke (of Finland), is derived from Proto-Germanic druhtinaz, lord, which survives in Scandinavian languages as the now archaïc drott, lord, sovereign, (female form: the still current drottning, queen) and drots, drost, drottsete, drossard, Drost, Truchsess, a very high-ranking medieval royal deputy whose title is translated as seneschal or high steward.

That means that Finnish has no truly native noble or royal titles! (Isäntä lord, master, seems to be derived from isä, father, much like Romance sir, sire, seigneur, señor, signore are derived from Latin senior, old man.) How fascinatingly egalitarian! I wonder if that has anything to do with the semi-nomadic slash-and-burn mode of agriculture?

Offline Превед

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Re: Finnish "Royals"
« Reply #25 on: November 18, 2013, 04:12:38 PM »
The Viking King Olav Tryggvason of Norway (960s – 1000) was one of the few European monarchs who, in addition to his native Norse, probably spoke a Finnic language (Estonian), picked up during his time as a slave in Estonia - and perhaps also Old East Slavic (Proto-Russian), from his time at the court of the Rurikid Vladimir the Great, Geat Prince of Kiev and Prince of Novgorod.

BTW the only monarch controlling Finland who actually knew Finnish was the Vasa King Johan III, King of Sweden and Duke and later Grand Prince of Finland, a Renaissance man and contemporary and enemy of Ivan the Terrible.
« Last Edit: November 18, 2013, 04:15:16 PM by Превед »
Березы севера мне милы,—
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: «Ивы и березы», 1843 / 1856)