Author Topic: NAOTMAA - Their Contributions to Russia  (Read 40595 times)

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Offline Lanie

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #60 on: October 21, 2005, 11:52:10 PM »
Olga did not quit nursing--she just ended up handling linens and things, cleaning instruments, while Tatiana continued to help with the operations and other grisly cases.  On the way to Ekaterinburg Olga offered to assist one of the men accompanying them who injured his foot, I believe.

Offline Sarushka

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #61 on: October 22, 2005, 08:35:27 AM »
Lanie --

Do you know when Olga made the switch from the more intense jobs to linens & instruments? I read in Virginia Cowles's book that she only lasted a month with surgery & whatnot, which surprised me -- I had the impression it was much longer.
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
"A dramatic, powerful narrative and a masterful grasp of life in this vanished world." ~Greg King

rskkiya

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #62 on: October 22, 2005, 09:17:38 AM »
Sarushka...
I am not familiar with this situation (the linen closet incident) however - perhaps she simply had a sensitive stomach, and rather than participate in operations - it was considered more effective for her to do other work.

[where's  my  :-*] ;)
LOL

rskkiya

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by rskkiya »

Offline matushka

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #63 on: October 22, 2005, 03:10:48 PM »
As far as I know, ON was a nurse more than a month. Reading the Chebotareva's diary, you discover entry about the Olga's difficulties in her work only in the second part of 1915. She stoped working as a nurse in october, but continue to help with instrument, doing the beds and others things. As Chebotareva wrote, "she can not see any more wounds". It was in october. As the same time, she got ill (anemy) and an entire month did not work at all.

Offline Sarushka

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #64 on: October 22, 2005, 03:32:27 PM »
Thank you, Matushka!

That's exactly the sort of information I was looking for.
:-*

Where can I read Chebotareva's diary? (I speak English and some Russian).
THE LOST CROWN: A Novel of Romanov Russia -- now in paperback!
"A dramatic, powerful narrative and a masterful grasp of life in this vanished world." ~Greg King

Offline matushka

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #65 on: October 23, 2005, 07:47:01 AM »
Sarah, at the moment I have only read large extacts of this diary. I take them from the book of Sergei Fomin about Alexandra Feodorovna "Skorbny angel". It was published in Moscow this year. I am looking for the entire diary, it was published in the Novy Jurnal, an american journal in russian. I gave the references in the thread about Valentina Ivanovna Chebotareva (see the section about friends, retainers and so on). I will have it soon.

Offline matushka

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #66 on: October 23, 2005, 08:02:58 AM »
About Olga's problem, a quote from a wounded, Pavlov: (first he explain what she did every day in the lazaret, and then:) Someone told me that she worked in the operation room some times. But seeing the poor people with horribles deformations destroyed her fine nervous system, and she got up.
About Tatiana (after explanation of her work): How her tender organism could support the horribles things she saw, I simply do not know.
Pavlov was in the lazaret in the 2nd part of 1916 and until the end.
As usual, sorry for the translation. I hope it gave you an idea ;)

Offline imperial angel

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #67 on: October 23, 2005, 09:29:34 PM »
Quote
Olga did not quit nursing--she just ended up handling linens and things, cleaning instruments, while Tatiana continued to help with the operations and other grisly cases.  On the way to Ekaterinburg Olga offered to assist one of the men accompanying them who injured his foot, I believe.


Exactly, I hope I did not give people the impression that she quit nursing altogether. I was uninformed.

Offline tian79

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #68 on: October 28, 2005, 06:55:23 AM »
Little more information about Tatiana's committee.
Quote is from Nikolai II exhibition catalogue. The exhibition was held last year in Finland.

“The Special Committee of Grand Duchess Tatiana Nicholaevna was founded to aid refugees, in particular, its representatives facilitated providing victims with shelter, jobs, as well as searching for people separated from their friends and relatives by military actions.”

“The Committee arranged fund raising for the victims of military actions called ‘A bucket of wheat of the new crop’, and measures for collecting things required by the army.“

Offline ZarevnaOlga

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #69 on: November 01, 2005, 04:46:43 AM »
There no one topic about the Imperial Family during the War, so i think there can be pictures from this time



Its from Alias Site NAOTMAA, it is not online unfortantly!!!


1916


1916/2


1916/3


Offline Laura Mabee

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #70 on: November 01, 2005, 08:08:09 AM »
Oh Olga... you've done it again. You've contributed greatly to the forum! Thank you!!  ;D

Offline ZarevnaOlga

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #71 on: November 02, 2005, 02:33:25 AM »
Alexandra a s a nurse


Postcard, a gift for Dr. Botkin

Offline matushka

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Re: NAOTMAA - Their Contributions to Russia
« Reply #72 on: November 10, 2005, 09:53:14 AM »

Offline imperial angel

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #73 on: October 09, 2006, 12:52:47 PM »
I agree with the last person's observation about those photos..they are so nice. As for the nursing, I thnink Real Anastasia's post was correct. It is understandable why nursing didn't come naturally for Olga. Not all of us can be good at everything, and this just wasn't Olga's thing. It certainly suited Alexandra well, as she wanted to actually deal with people/and be comfortable with people outside her own world. She felt comfortable with nursing in a way she never felt comfortable with a more public role as Empress.

Offline James1941

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Re: OTMA's Nursing at WW I
« Reply #74 on: October 09, 2006, 05:16:50 PM »
Here she was, the consort of the sovereign emperor and all-Russian tsar, the second lady in the land, and she spent her time as a common nurse in her private hospital. Imagine how embarrassing it was for those poor soldiers to find the wife of their sovereign holding bedpans for them to use or washing their private parts. Think how you would feel in your place. It wasn't her job. She had far more important things to do.
There were hundreds, thousands, of young women who could do the job better than she could. One didn't find the Dowager Empress doing such  tasks. One didn't find Queen Mary or Queen Alexandra doing it. One didn't see the German Empress dressed in a nurses uniform performing such menial tasks. This was just one more example of Alexandra's perverted sense of her duties. She would have done far more good for her husband and the imperial cause if she had spent her days visiting the field hospitals and rehabilitation wards, visitisng the refugee camps for the displaced Russians, visiting workers in the munition factories that keep the war effort going. There were many more symbolic tasks she could have done. I think the general consensus of observers at the time and historians later that she did very little good and much damage by her
nursing stints. Even many of those who were in her hospital were either bothered by her presence or spoke insulting of her behind her back. She thought she was being humble, but she wasn't a humble person. She was Empress of Russia and should have acted like one.