Author Topic: Food, Wine and Meals  (Read 41486 times)

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Offline hikaru

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #30 on: March 30, 2005, 11:19:55 PM »
I would like to share with you the Menu of the Winter Palace Ball took place on 19th  January 1904 .
I will write it in French, according to the original.
I would like to know, if somebody know what is the dessert  Bombe Victoria?

SOUPER
du 19 Janvier 1904

Consomme Rassolnik
Pailles au fromage, Fondant, Feuilett'es
Langoustes a la Parisienne
Timballes de Volaille Toulouse
aux Pointes d'Asperges
Roti: Faisans de Boheme et Gelinottes
Salad
Truffes au champagne
Bombe Victoria
Dessert

Offline Sarai

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #31 on: April 03, 2005, 03:41:45 PM »
Quote
I would like to know, if somebody know what is the dessert  Bombe Victoria?


I found a description of it on the Internet:
"Mold lined with cherry ice cream and the center filled with vanilla ice cream and chopped candied fruit."

Offline hikaru

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #32 on: April 06, 2005, 08:58:27 AM »
OOOO, I want it.
Will try to replace it with ice-cream from my refrigerator.

Offline Elocin

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #33 on: April 06, 2005, 01:38:07 PM »
That sounds so yummy! Truly a dessert fit for royalty!

Offline Robert_Hall

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #34 on: April 06, 2005, 02:27:40 PM »
It does seem a bit odd that "bombes" were so popular back then,  I have several royalty-related recipes. And I love making them. But, you know what "bombe" means ?   To serve it at a Romanov dinner- how ironic.
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Offline Joanna

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #35 on: April 10, 2008, 02:31:52 PM »
Another interesting article - this time on the history of the Tsars' Kitchens with details on the AP,  locations of the kitchens in the Winter Palace, etc:
http://kremlin-9.rosvesty.ru/news/48/

Joanna


Offline Forum Admin

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #36 on: April 10, 2008, 04:30:09 PM »
Could some kind Russian speaker translate this for me?? I'd love to read it.

Offline Joanna

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #37 on: April 10, 2008, 08:02:43 PM »
A quick translation! Anyone who can correct or clarify, please help.

Tsar’s Kitchen

Many countries were concerned about the safety of the products intended for Heads of State table. In ancient Rome, there was a special post for “food taster”who tried each dish that was supplied to the emperor. In pre-revolutionary Russia the preparation of food for the tsars traditionally ensured the safety of the suppliers by conducting tests.

After the edict of Paul I on the line of succession along the main line, palace coups ended.  At the beginning of the administration of Nikolai I’s kitchen, although risk factor had of coups had lessened, there was still maintained the same attention by officials for the health of the tsar.

Under the office of the administrator was the sanitary and expense of the kitchens. The corps-pages waited at the table of Alexandr I. Waiters wore gloves and their loyalty was  was checked. On 30 August, 1856 with the coronation of Aleksandr II, a new court rank was introduced - Ober-Forshneyder(?).  He assisted with the chef(?) the dishes to the imperial table which was escorted by two officers of Kavalergardskogo regiment with broadswords and also the cooked meat and plates intended for the Imperial couple.

It is known that the products, supplied to the imperial table, were checked by the method of "chemical decomposition". In the fall of 1852 the court pharmacist Z. Lorenz reported to the court medical manager the products inspected by him were “completed without harmful health impurities”. In the spring of 1853, on the personal instruction of Nikolai I, all city stores that sold pikuli (small vegetables, marrionated in vinegar with spices), were to be sampled for conducting of chemical analyses.

Many problems arose with canned foods which had begun to enter into daily life. In 1863 head waiter Seger reported at Livadia that "the tin provisions proved to be largly unfit to use". At the end 1870s when the terrorist threat against the tsar increased, chemical  research of products was conducted as a safety measure for the imperial family. Thus, in 1878 an order was added for the "study of vodka and candies".

Chefs along with all service personnel were not employed under the court department  but hired on contract. Periodically this order was changed. The kitchen was transferred to the tight control of court department and long-term contracts were concluded with the suppliers. But this led only to an increase in abuses in the kitchen, and in 1852 changed so that the kitchen personnel were trained under the chefs. Up to 1917 the kitchen remained an independent subdivision of court, being subordinated to the head waiter.

In the Winter Palace (from end XVIII) several kitchens were used during different reigns. Since there were thousands of people working in the palace, the largest kitchens were located in the northeastern basement and first floors  In the basement were stored products of water, coal, firewood, and servants quarters. The room names reflected their functional designation: Pastry, etc.  Further along the Rastrelli Gallery, under the halls of the Military Gallery of Heroes of 1812 were located the rooms for the kitchen of Marie Feodorovna, wife of Paul 1, and the chefs followed from palace to palace with their master.

In December 1826 Nikolai I personally determined the size of the "food allowance" of each member of the imperial family which was 25 rubles in a 24 hour period. The children also were allowed 25 rubles, but out of this sum payment for food was deducted for their tutors. The same amount was used for guests of the family. It was significant for those times that the Tsar would require of the head waiter that "the food would be the best with the allowable allowance”. Thus alcohol was the answer. Although Nikolai I did not drink much, he did not limit the quantity served. Thus three ladies-in-waiting consumed in 17 days 36 bottles of various labels and 15 bottles of beer.
 
On 26 October, 1833  “the decrease in the food allowance and the rise of prices" marked the beginning of a more economical time for the imperial court. Dinner included: soup, patties, cold, seasoned beef, fish sauce, poulty sauce, vegetables, hot, milk or bread jelly or cream. The new menu proposed included 8 changes (dishes): soup, patties, seasoned beef, fish sauce, poulty sauce, hot, milk or bread jelly or cream. One less dish also was served for supper. Earlier there were three changes: soup, cold, fish sauce. Since 1841 the soup, fish sauce or instead of it cold fish, dessert, fruits were served in the rooms of the on-duty officials.

The usual daily practice was the use of gold (?) on which the china dishes were placed. The imperial table differed only with the desserts of fruits which were fresh from the Ropsha hothouses. Yelisevev was the fruit merchant supplier and dairy products came from the Elagin and Tsarskoe Selo dairy farms. For safety reasons, the milk was transported in bottles covered by ice and then stored in the ice house. Milk was also bought from other suppliers.

To be continued:

Offline Joanna

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #38 on: April 10, 2008, 08:03:57 PM »
Tsar's Kitchen continued:

Scandals occurred occasionally in the imperial kitchens in spite of the sanitary controls which were investigated by the minister of the court. Thus in 1847 there was the issue of the trout which was of ‘poor quality’. Sometimes the scandals became a political issue which reflected on the Imperial house. For example in 1861 the Imam of (?) which for two decades waged war against Russia, had a poorly prepared dinner in Krasnoe Selo. THE III Order of deliveries by the emperor kitchen began to change with Aleksandr. Instead of foreign wine and champagne they began to buy domestic. They forbade to order abroad usual products - potatoes, pork and fat. Hardly this referred to safety, faster the matter was in the guidance of order on the kitchen and the elementary savings.

One of the traditions of the imperial court was the traditional yearly present. For example, the Ural Cossacks supplied every spring caviar and fish as the first “Imperial catch”.

These traditions were followed during the reign of Nikolai II. In the Alexander palace, the kitchen was located in a separate building and in the basement of the palace where the preparation of the Imperial family meals were cooked. A tunnel connected the two buildings.  In the basement of palace nine large rooms were used for kitchens and canteens. In "Their Own Canteen of Their Majesties"  were prepared coffee, boiled milk, cream and chocolate. In "Its Own (?) Kitchen" were prepared dishes  which it was necessary to bring to the table heated. There were a worktable, pastry ovens, boiler for heating the water, spit and device for the preparation of shashlik on birch coals. Several canteens and kitchens were also for the attendants and servants.

Traditionally soldiers would test the food prepared for the Tsar. They were brought daily to the Alexander Palace to conduct such “tests”, of which these regimental guards were rotated among the various divisions quartered in the town.  However, these were not simple tests. According to a memoir, everything was tested "from the ovens - different spices were added to the silver tsarist cruet stands, everything that was flavored by the sour cream, podlivoy (?), and undoubtedly cabbage soups appeared already first-class ".

When the imperial family moved to their other palaces, the kitchen staff went also and used the foods from the palace storerooms or products were brought from the nearest residence. Thus, during sails in the Finnish skerries, fresh products were brough from Peterhof in torpedo boats. The chef of the Massandra and Livadia estates, N.N. Kachalov said “what  enormous quantity of eggs, milk, cream and oil is required daily for the court, and needed to be dispatched to Sevastopol where the Imperial family was visiting”.
 
There were traditions maintained in the kitchen. For instance, from the time of Nikolai I, it was the custom of the court for the kalatches (?) to be eaten hot with a heated napkin. For the baking of these kalatches  (?) cistern water was used in the tsarist kitchen.
 
The safety of the food was one of the most important functions of the subdivisions of protection, which checked, first of all, the personnel who were employed with the preparation of dishes for the imperial table. The quality of products was guaranteed by the reputation of the suppliers, who were selected very thoroughly. In the beginning of the twentieth century began the practice of  providing products from the imperial farms, hothouses and fishing. Each Imperial family had its own kitchen, its suppliers and kitchen personnel which accompanied during the seasonal passages to their palaces. However, the menu of imperial table, for the most part, was determined by traditions, which were established with by the court and by the predilections of one or another emperor in his time.

Joanna

Offline BobG

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #39 on: April 11, 2008, 05:26:22 AM »
according to my dictionary

калачи = kalach is a white wheatmeal loaf (bread)

BobG

Offline Mike

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #40 on: April 11, 2008, 06:17:09 AM »
Podliva = thick sauce added to a dish.
Kalach = round white loaf, often with a dough-baked handle. It was usually eaten with tea from samovar. See it masterly painted by Boris Kustodiev:

Offline BobG

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #41 on: April 11, 2008, 08:22:53 AM »

Traditionally soldiers would test the food prepared for the Tsar. They were brought daily to the Alexander Palace to conduct such “tests”, of which these regimental guards were rotated among the various divisions quartered in the town.  However, these were not simple tests. According to a memoir, everything was tested "from the ovens - different spices were added to the silver tsarist cruet stands, everything that was flavored by the sour cream, podlivoy (?), and undoubtedly cabbage soups appeared already first-class ".


This is my attempts at this passage:

"Traditionally emperors took samples from his soldier's food pots. At the Alexander palace such "samples" were brought daily, alternatively from various securtity divisions and from the kitchens of the  Guards regiments billeted nearby . However they were not simple samples. According to one memoir, all samples were taken « from the general pot, but with enhancements. To the silver imperial dinner pail different spices were added, all was flavoured with sour cream, gravy, and, certainly, the russian sailor's cabbage soup appeared first class»."

To my Russian friends, let me know if this comes close (there's a lot of "uneducated guessing" in my translating.

BobG
« Last Edit: April 11, 2008, 08:28:39 AM by BobG »

Offline Mike

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #42 on: April 11, 2008, 09:07:49 AM »
but with enhancements a ruse.
Otherwise, it's fine.


Offline EmmyLee

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Re: Food, Wine and Meals
« Reply #44 on: July 14, 2008, 01:29:52 PM »
It was significant for those times that the Tsar would require of the head waiter that "the food would be the best with the allowable allowance”. Thus alcohol was the answer. Although Nikolai I did not drink much, he did not limit the quantity served. Thus three ladies-in-waiting consumed in 17 days 36 bottles of various labels and 15 bottles of beer.
 

The thought of this makes me sick. Many thanks to Joanna and BobG on their translations of the article! It's not surprising that such precautions were taken to ensure that the food was safe to give to the Tsar, especially when terrorist activity heightened.