Author Topic: Anastasia's Favorite book?  (Read 28107 times)

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Offline Holly

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #15 on: May 30, 2005, 08:08:08 PM »
Hi and welcome to the forum Zoya!
I agree the summary is beautiful. I don't think Anastasia intentionally wrote it as if it were her own predicament, but it certainly sounds as if it were!  I don't think we will ever know!
"Господь им дал дар по молитвам их размягчать окаменелые наши сердца за их страдания..Мне думается, что если люди будут молиться Царской Cемье, оттают сердца с Божией помощью."

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Offline aya-anya

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2005, 11:01:39 AM »
Thanks for the responses!

I think the summary Anastasia wrote somehow sounds more romantic than Browning's poem.  

Does anybody know exactly when she wrote the summary? I wonder if Anastasia was 16 years old just like "Evelyn Hope" when she learned the poem.  And, only Anastasia learned that poem?

I found the summary that Anastasia wrote  in Peter Kurth's "Anastasia--The Riddle of Anna Anderson" but in "Note" page of this book, I found it was "Transcribed from endpapers in Trein, The House of Special Purpose"---perhaps more information on the summary that Anastasia wrote is in this book?      

I agree with RealAnastasia. She had talents for painting and writing!

Holly, I saw your website, and I liked the song "Once Upon a December" in your website! I love the songs of the cartoon movie of Anastasia in 1997...

aya-anya

Offline Georgiy

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2005, 04:05:59 PM »
I don't think there's any further info in Tutor to the Tsarevich other than the story being reproduced for all to read. I think it was done after the abdication. Maybe she thought about her own future while reading the poem, who knows? In hindsight it seems very sad and quite like a premonition.
Anastasia also wrote an interesting account of their train journey from Tsarskoe to Tobol'sk, in it she mentions that at some wayside stop a little boy called her 'uncle', but she said that she was not an uncle but an 'anty' (I think that's how she spelt it!), and wondered why he would call her uncle until she remembered her hair had been cut short!

Offline Lanie

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #18 on: June 01, 2005, 04:16:51 PM »
This was in her composition book, most likely just for an English exercise (complete with her spelling errors):

My dear Friend.  I will tell you who [how] we travelled.  We started in the morningand when we got into the train I went to sleap, so did all of us.  We were very tierd because we did not sleap the whole night.  The first day was very hot and very dusty.  At the stations we had to shut our window curtanse that nobody should see us.  Once in the evening I was loking out the window we stoped near a little house, but there was no station so we could look out.  A little boy came to my window and asked: "Uncle, please give me, if you have got, a newspaper."  I said: "I am not an uncle but a anty and have no newspaper."  At the first moment I could not understand why did he call me "Uncle" but then I rememberd that my hear is cut and I and the soldiers (which were standing next to me) laught very much.  On the way many funy things hapend, and if I shall have time I shall write to youn our travell farther on.  Good by.  Dont forget me.  Many kisses from us all to you my darling.  Your A.

Anastasia's handwriting is rather hard to read, not as hard as Tatiana's, though...

Here's what she wrote about Evelyn Hope in full:

A young girle who was called Evelyn had just died.  She was lying in the cofen very pretty.  All her things wher in the same place nothing was changed and even the flower which she gatherd, stood in the glase, but was begining to faid.  When she died she was only sixteen years old.  Ther was a man who loved her without having seen her but new her very well.  And she herd of him also.  He never could tell her that he loved her, and now she was dead.  But still he thought that when he and she cold live life when ever it will be, that ....
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Lanie »

Offline aya-anya

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #19 on: June 07, 2005, 08:27:44 AM »
Hi,

I'm wondering, if many people who know "Russian writing style," write "Don't forget me" as complimentary close (for example, "My Best" or "Sincerely yours"?)  

aya-anya

Offline Georgiy

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #20 on: June 07, 2005, 03:33:39 PM »
I don't think so, but a native speaker could answer this better. So far as I know, the usual sign-off is tseluyu (Kisses, - or literally: I kiss you)

Offline Shvibzik

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #21 on: June 07, 2005, 03:58:47 PM »
Well, since they did live in the early twentieth century, they were not ashamed to "express themselves" (i.e. "Many kisses to you my darling") like we are somewhat today.  So, if you read their notes and letters to another, they usually end off in some kind of affectionate salutation.

Are you looking for how the Romanovs ended their letters, or just for a Russian salutation in general?
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Shvibzik »

Offline Lanie

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #22 on: June 07, 2005, 05:28:00 PM »
Letters from the girls often ended in 'Kisses!  I embrace you' to those they knew.  Example being Anastasia to her aunt Ksenia in 1918: We embrace all of you.  Good bye, darling Auntie.  God bless you.  Loving you, Your A.

Offline grandduchess_sofia

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #23 on: June 09, 2005, 11:28:01 AM »
tseluyu, thats such a beautiful word! it really suits what it means. :)
sopzxx

Offline aya-anya

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #24 on: June 12, 2005, 09:06:46 AM »
Quote
Well, since they did live in the early twentieth century, they were not ashamed to "express themselves" (i.e. "Many kisses to you my darling") like we are somewhat today.  So, if you read their notes and letters to another, they usually end off in some kind of affectionate salutation.

Are you looking for how the Romanovs ended their letters, or just for a Russian salutation in general?


Thanks! I just wondered why Anastasia wrote "Don't forget me" in her letter before she killed...in my personal opinion, "Don't forget me" sounded like, resurrection-- "She will rise again" as her name, "Anastasia" meant...

aya-anya

Offline aya-anya

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #25 on: August 14, 2005, 02:04:01 AM »
Hi.
I've been wondering whether or not the poem (This photo is from "Anastasia's Album" p26) is composed by Anastasia. Or is this quoted? If anyone knows what this poem is, please tell me!


aya-anya

Offline Holly

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #26 on: August 14, 2005, 10:44:58 AM »
Thank you for posting this close up picture of her workbook! I love looking at her letters and writings!
This page is from her english workbook and I'm sure it is just an exercise with writing sentences. It wasn't written to anyone.
"Господь им дал дар по молитвам их размягчать окаменелые наши сердца за их страдания..Мне думается, что если люди будут молиться Царской Cемье, оттают сердца с Божией помощью."

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Offline rosebud

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #27 on: August 14, 2005, 02:09:20 PM »
About the books the girls read. I dont know if Anastasia read it or not but at least Maria did. And Nicholas.
It is written by Florence Barclay, bestseller author of her time and it is called The rosary. It is quite an experience, in an oldfashioned way and gives a good laugh because it has gone out of date long ago, but it still is a rather beautiful lovestory. My friend is able to quote it in every possible situation and what could be more fun than that.
R

Offline Georgiy

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #28 on: August 14, 2005, 04:48:51 PM »
I very much like the book "The Rosary" it really is very sentimental, but it is a nice and moving story.

By the way, Anastasia does not mean "She who will rise again", it is Greek for 'Resurrection' (i.e. of Christ) in its Feminine form. There is no future tense in the name as far as I know. The male version is Anastasios (Greek), Anastasiy (Russian). There are about two or three early Christian Martresses of this name, one of whom was Anastasia's patron Saint.

Offline aya-anya

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Re: Anastasia; a reader
« Reply #29 on: August 15, 2005, 01:12:06 AM »
Thank you, Holly, rosebud, and Georgiy!!

aya-anya