Author Topic: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures  (Read 110793 times)

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David_Pritchard

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Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« on: June 14, 2005, 07:11:20 PM »
Almost ten years ago, I remember reading a weekly edition of the English language newspaper "Moscow Times" in which the grave of Grand Duke Serge was found in the crypt of a demolished Moscow church that had been filled in and paved over for a parking lot. It seems that the pavement was being renovated or the lot was being developed and that the coffin of the Grand Duke and others in the crypt were to be relocated. Does anyone know what became of GD Serge's remains?

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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2005, 09:16:47 PM »
I know they were reburied in a church. I saw a photo of it once and haven't been able to find it since. Maybe this'll inspire me to go look again.  :)
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Offline Robert_Hall

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2005, 09:51:31 PM »
He was reburied on 17 Sept. 1995 at Novospassky Monastery, Moscow.
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David_Pritchard

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2005, 11:40:31 PM »
Thank you for the information Robert. I found the Novospassky Monastary in my driving atlas between Krasnoholmskaya Nab. and Novospassky Pr. with the nearest Metro Station being Proletarskaya. Unfortunately, I never came near this rayon as far as I know. If I had spied a monastary out a car or taxi window I would have most definitively investigated.

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Offline Robert_Hall

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2005, 11:47:02 PM »
According to what I have read, the place has a rather old but also sad history. Being used by the Cheka and NKVD as a prison, burial place. Only returned to the Church in 1991. [you can see pictures of it on a Google search]
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2005, 09:22:54 AM »
Here's what I turned up:

Situated in the southeastern Taganka region of Moscow, the Novospassky Monastery claims to be the oldest monastery in Moscow and is thought to have been founded in the 12th century during the reign of Prince Yury Dolgoruky, the founder of Moscow.

Dedicated to the Savior and established initially on the site of the present-day Danilov Monastery, Novospassky was transferred to the Kremlin complex in 1300 by Ivan The Terrible and then relocated back to its present site in 1490 by Ivan III, hence its name "New Monastery of the Savior" or "Novospassky Monastery".

The monastery's original buildings were razed to the ground by the Tartars and most of the structures still standing today date from the 17th century, when thick fortress walls and bastions were built to protect the complex from further Tartar attacks during the Time of Troubles.

During the 20th century the monastery played a more sinister role in Russia's history, serving the Bolsheviks as a concentration camp, the NKVD as an archive, housing a furniture factory and finally a alcoholics' rehabilitation center, before eventually being returned to the church in 1991. Also in the monastery complex visitors will see a large pond, near the western wall of the fortifications, which once supplied the resident monks with fish but whose banks were later used by the NKVD to bury foreign Communists secretly shot during the purges of the 1930s.

As you pass through the monastery's main gateway, guarded by a gigantic four-tiered bell tower, you see that impressive medieval-style facade of the Cathedral of the Transfiguration of the Savior. Built in 1645 on the site of the original cathedral and designed to look like the Cathedral of the Dormition in the Kremlin, the church and its crypt served as the family vault of the Romanov boyars until Mikhail Romanov's ascension to the throne in 1613.

The cathedral's exterior features huge arched gables and helmet-shaped domes and its interior is covered with frescoes charting the history of the sovereigns of Russian from St. Olga to Tsar Alexei, and images of the great Greek philosophers. The church's dominating gilt-framed iconostasis includes icons of the Image of Christ and Our Lady Of Smolensk, which was donated to the monastery by the mother of Tsar Mikhail, who became a nun there.

Elsewhere in the monastery complex visitors will find the faded orange Church of the Sign, which contains the tomb of Pasha Kovalyova, the serf girl whose controversial and secretive marriage to Count Nikolai Sheremetev sent shock waves through late 18th century Muscovite high society. The Count claimed to have fallen in love with Pasha when he saw her for the first time, leading a cow home from the woods on his Kuskovo Estate just outside Moscow. The young peasant girl was tutored in the dramatic arts and became a gifted opera singer who performed at the Count's sumptuous Ostankino Palace under the stage name of "Zhemchugova", from the Russian word for "pearl". After fourteen years of living together out of wedlock, the Count married his serf bride but buried her in the cathedral just three years later when she died shortly after giving birth to his child.

Another interesting story linked to the monastery is that of Princess Tarakanova, whose remains are interred in a small tent-roofed chapel to the north of the main cathedral. The Princess, Sister Inokeniya Dosieeya, was the illegitimate child of Empress Elizabeth and Count Razumovsky. On being sent abroad to be educated, a Polish adventuress emerged and tried to claim her identity and her right to inherit the throne. The impostor was revealed and imprisoned, but Empress Catherine the Great thought it best to lure Tarakanova back to the country and confine her to a nunnery for the good of Russia. To this task she entrusted her favorite lover, Count Orlov, who seduced the young heiress aboard a ship before locking her in her cabin and ensuring her return to Russia. Although one version of the story insists that the unlucky princess was imprisoned in the Peter and Paul Fortress and drowned during a flood, she was in fact brought to the Ivanovsky Convent and confined there for 25 years until Catherine's death, whereupon she had come to accept her fate and chose to stay.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by grandduchessella »
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Offline jfkhaos

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2005, 10:09:18 AM »

Novospassky Monastery

Offline Greta

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2005, 08:53:56 AM »
On page 227 of Camera and the Tsars, there is a reference to proceedings are underway for the canonisation of Grand Duke Sergei.  Has anyone heard/ got more details on this?

Sergei has always struck me as a bit of an unpleasant character (cold, arrogant, Anti-Semitic etc) although after reading various threads perhaps that may not necessarily be the case particularly if you consider who is describing his character (Sandro comes up as a good example).

Much appreciated on hearing anyone's thoughts!  :)

Offline Ortino

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2005, 09:14:26 AM »
I don't know about the canonization of Grand Duke Sergei, but Romanov Autumn has an interesting section about Sergei that dismisses much of those unfavorable characteristics. I think it's important to remember that not everyone necessarily got along with or liked Sergei and their portrayals may (and probably will) reflect that.

Offline hikaru

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2005, 11:08:55 AM »
I think that Sergey  was very honest, smart , kind , generouse  and faithful person

Offline Arleen

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2005, 11:19:39 AM »
WHICH Grand Duke Sergei are you talking about?  If it is Ella's husband,  that is right up there with one of the "worst ideas I've ever heard"!  That Sergei was a horrible human being......

..Arleen

Offline hikaru

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #11 on: June 18, 2005, 11:28:36 AM »
Why do you think that he was horrible?
Cause of Hodynka, or cause he was a gay?
He was just real Romanov.

Finelly

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #12 on: June 18, 2005, 12:39:08 PM »
One's sexual preference is not good or evil.  Serge's sexuality is not the issue.

What IS the issue is his behavior and his treatment of others.  And if you want to claim he was "just real romanov", and also claim that the Romanovs were not antisemitic, we have a problem.

In 1891, Serge ordered all Jews expelled from Moscow.  He allowed his cossaks to pillage the entire Jewish neighborhood and slaughter people.

Offline Greta

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2005, 01:08:06 AM »
Yep, just to clarify - I refer to Ella's husband.  I know this had been mentioned on the other Sergei A thread sometime last year but am curious if anyone has heard anything more.

Putting aside his character for the moment (thanks for the recommendation Ortino - will check out Romanov Autumn soon) under what grounds would he be canonised (if at all)? Would that be the same as the IF?

Offline Dominic_Albanese

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Re: Grand Duke Sergei Alexandrovitch, discussion and pictures
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2005, 07:25:45 AM »
GD Sergei has intrigued me forever - I do so hope that a respected, thoughtful author (I can think of a couple off hand) would take the time and write a good bio on him.  At the 10,000 ft level the press on him until recently has been very bad - anti semite, ruthless persecutor of those who wanted reform, bully to ella and the family, sadist homosexual who like to abuse little boys, and the man singularly responsible for the disaster at NII's coronation.  Of late, the press (I mean writing in general) has soften abit - I've read that he was an able administrator, the Bio's on Ella (that I have read) speak of him as a strange, but good husband, His homosexual desires have been re-portrayed without the sado/little boy stories and as the person responsible for NII's coronation of course the Khonye (spelling) incident fell on his watch - but I've never read specifically what he did or did not do on that fateful day (we do know that he pressured N&A to go to the French Coronation ball that evening - a tragic mistake).  So my sense remains that the jury is out on him and until a serious author looks into him I don't think we'll know for sure who he was.  

One problem we have - with the Romanov family in particular - is that so much of what we know today has simply been repeated over and over again through the years because of the Soviet's not allowing access to their archives.  Where writing on the British, German and other royal families has had an opportunity to 'mature' over the last 70 years as new material became available, that hasn't happened with the Romanov's until the last 10 or 15 years with the downfall of communism and the opening of the archives.

Arturo Beeche, Greg King, Coryne Hall, Charlotte Z - why don't you folks do a book on Sergei and the other son's of Emperor A II?!?

dca

Please don't read into this that I either support or don't support Sergei's cannoziation.  Frankly, going back to my message - I don't think the general public knows enough to know whether this is a good thing (as a Martyr) or not...

I wish this thing had a spell checker...
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Dominic_Albanese »