Author Topic: The children of Maria II of Portugal  (Read 46476 times)

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Offline dmitri

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #15 on: January 08, 2008, 06:55:08 AM »
Guide Books are available in English in most of the former Royal Palaces in Portugal. I picked up one at Ajuda Palace, Queluez Palace and the Pena Palace in Sintra. I also picked up a great book on the former Portuguese Crown jewels and also one on Queen Maria Pia. I wish I could have picked up biographies in English but they were sadly only in Portuguese. They are not so good at catering for foreigners.

Offline Norbert

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2008, 04:16:19 PM »
you are so lucky. The Ajuda was closed and Queluz was sterile in atmosphere. I enjoyed the Pena Castle which was described in 1980 as an" example of vulgar decadance of the former tyrants"

Offline dmitri

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #17 on: January 10, 2008, 08:09:59 AM »
The Ajuda Palace can sometimes be closed for State Dinners. The republic still uses the large State Dining Room. It is normally open. It was largely redecorated by Queen Maria Pia. She lived there until shortly before being forced to flee with the onset of the 1910 revolution. It is really worth a visit. A wonderful tram takes you up there from the city.

Offline José

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #18 on: January 12, 2008, 10:59:23 AM »
The Ajuda Palace can sometimes be closed for State Dinners. The republic still uses the large State Dining Room. It is normally open. It was largely redecorated by Queen Maria Pia. She lived there until shortly before being forced to flee with the onset of the 1910 revolution. It is really worth a visit. A wonderful tram takes you up there from the city.

And until February, you can visit the Hermitage exhibition at D.Luis Galeria - part of the palace.
Palácio is the most sumptuous, yet unfinished, royal palace of Lisbon.
When King D.Luis died, his son D.Carlos decided that he would not have his Mother moving from a palace she loved so much and that she personally redecorated with such passion, so he lived in Belém Palace, nowadays the official residence of the President of the Republic.
This one opens one day per year at the National Monuments Day and sometimes one day in April (National Holiday).
On Sundays you can watch the Changeing of the Horse Guards cerimony.

Offline Norbert

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #19 on: January 21, 2008, 01:15:34 PM »
Why do these Republics keep all the ceremony of the former monarchys....changing the guard etc? And the president lives in a Royal palace?

Offline José

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2008, 04:20:11 PM »
The official explanation for Presidents to live in Royal Palaces is that ... they are available and it is easier to protect the president in a palace than in its own residence/flat.

Many of our presidents don't actually live in the palace but it is their official residence, i.e., they work and entertain their visitors there.

I know that the King and Queen of Spain once had dinner at former president Sampaio flat in Lisbon.
That should have caused some chill to the security.

There is a nice (and true) story that one of the first presidents (1st republic 1910/26) refused the official driver and car, and went to work in Belém Palace by tramway.
Those were the days :-)

Offline Norbert

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #21 on: January 29, 2008, 10:54:07 AM »
At least the soviets were true to their creed and invented new ceremonies . I find it daft to surround the Republican President with the grandeur of it's royal heritage. It just does not work at any level. I agree the French president is ridiculous to maintain the Elysee and be chaperoned with guards dressed in imperial uniforms....I understand the security but to maintain a court in a Royal Palace at public expense, whats wrong with putting some guards outside their family home.

Offline DonaAntonia

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #22 on: March 30, 2009, 06:39:27 PM »
Princess Maria Anna






Her daughters Mathilde and Maria Josepha






Her son Frederick William




Her grandson Frederick Christian




It sure is wonderful to see descendents of Braganzas who believed in Democracy! King Carlos did not die without any relatives except for his mother, brother, wife and sons, all of which have no issue. He was part of an enlarged family and this particular aunt was always close to him. Princess Maria Anna married Prince Georg of Saxony in 1859, at the Necessidades Chapel, in Lisbon. Unlike people generally think, she did not renounce totally to her succession rights. Her marriage agreement did say that, in the case of her brothers having no issue, she would again assume her rights to the Portuguese throne. That was the constitutional and democratic law still practiced in 1910, when Portugal became a Republic.

« Last Edit: October 08, 2010, 04:52:02 PM by trentk80 »


«I am sometimes afraid of being so attached to my Country.
Only now, after leaving, do I realize how much I love the Portuguese.»
 
Princess Antonia (letter to her brother, King Luiz, 1887)

Offline DonaAntonia

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #23 on: March 30, 2009, 06:52:17 PM »
Princess Maria Anna photographed in Lisbon, 1859, by court photographer F. A. Gomes.



«I am sometimes afraid of being so attached to my Country.
Only now, after leaving, do I realize how much I love the Portuguese.»
 
Princess Antonia (letter to her brother, King Luiz, 1887)

Offline DonaAntonia

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #24 on: March 30, 2009, 06:58:41 PM »
Maria Anna and baby Mathilde (photo hanging on the wall  at the Ajuda Palace, near King Luis' room).





«I am sometimes afraid of being so attached to my Country.
Only now, after leaving, do I realize how much I love the Portuguese.»
 
Princess Antonia (letter to her brother, King Luiz, 1887)

Offline DonaAntonia

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #25 on: March 30, 2009, 07:09:08 PM »
Maria Anna of Braganza in later years.



«I am sometimes afraid of being so attached to my Country.
Only now, after leaving, do I realize how much I love the Portuguese.»
 
Princess Antonia (letter to her brother, King Luiz, 1887)

Offline DonaAntonia

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #26 on: March 30, 2009, 07:13:35 PM »
Her girls, Mathilde and Maria Josepha.



«I am sometimes afraid of being so attached to my Country.
Only now, after leaving, do I realize how much I love the Portuguese.»
 
Princess Antonia (letter to her brother, King Luiz, 1887)

Offline DonaAntonia

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #27 on: March 30, 2009, 07:17:59 PM »
Her eldest son, Frederick of Saxony as a young boy. He would be one of the last cousins to visit her nephew King Carlos before the 1908 regicide.



«I am sometimes afraid of being so attached to my Country.
Only now, after leaving, do I realize how much I love the Portuguese.»
 
Princess Antonia (letter to her brother, King Luiz, 1887)

Offline DonaAntonia

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #28 on: March 30, 2009, 07:21:15 PM »
Maria Anna's grandchildren. Frederick's 3 sons and 3 daughters. Two of the girls married into the family becoming Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen princesses.








«I am sometimes afraid of being so attached to my Country.
Only now, after leaving, do I realize how much I love the Portuguese.»
 
Princess Antonia (letter to her brother, King Luiz, 1887)

Offline DonaAntonia

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Re: The children of Maria II of Portugal
« Reply #29 on: March 30, 2009, 07:26:36 PM »
Maria Anna. Engraving by Sta. Barbara, 1859.



«I am sometimes afraid of being so attached to my Country.
Only now, after leaving, do I realize how much I love the Portuguese.»
 
Princess Antonia (letter to her brother, King Luiz, 1887)