Author Topic: St Petersburg 1914 - Why did Russia Go To War?  (Read 26941 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Bev

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 254
    • View Profile
Re: Why did Russia go to war in WW1?
« Reply #30 on: February 10, 2007, 01:59:15 PM »
I agree, James.  They were all guilty of conspiring and conniving and meddling in each others' domestic affairs.  To paraphrase Kurt, it would have been a miracle to keep all of them out of war.

(We haven't learned much, have we?)

Offline Elisabeth

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2131
    • View Profile
Re: Why did Russia go to war in WW1?
« Reply #31 on: February 10, 2007, 03:00:31 PM »
Bulgaria, which had done most of the fighting and expended its treasure and soldier's blood, was exhausted. Romania, which hadn't even fought in the First Balkan War, jumped in and grabbed the southern Dobruja from Bulgaria. Greece, which had not contributed much in the first war, grabbed Bulgaria's gains on the littoral of the Aegean and in Macedonia. Serbia grabbed the remainder of Macedonia, which wasn't Serb but ethnically tied to Bulgaria. And Albania was set up to keep the Serbs out of the Adriatic. The result was that Russia's only other ally in the Balkans, Bulgaria, angry and hurt went over to the Germans as an ally. Romania was already an ally of the Germans. Albania had a German puppet prince and was in the Geman-Austrian camp. Turkey was also gravitating into the German camp. Greece was also pro German now that Constantine and Sophie were on the throne. Serbia was Russia's only ally left in the Balkans. If it fell, Russia would be shut out of the entire area. This is one of the main reasons why Russia felt compelled to stand firm with Serbia in July, 1914.

Yes, and also the main reason why the average Bulgarian to this day excuses Boris III's pact with Hitler and applauds the territorial gains that accrued to Bulgaria as a result. It is indeed interesting to listen to Sofia taxi drivers wax philosophical on the subject of Boris III... (Who, as I recall, also happened to be Nicholas II's own godson!) But to return to the subject at hand, yes, I agree, it certainly wasn't a simple question of "Slav brotherhood" that led Russia to pin all its hopes on Serbia in August 1914.
... I love my poor earth
because I have seen no other

-- Osip Mandelshtam

Offline RichC

  • Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 757
    • View Profile
Re: Why did Russia go to war in WW1?
« Reply #32 on: February 11, 2007, 10:47:51 AM »
Has anyone on the board ever read the book The Long Fuse, by Laurence Lafore?  It's a take on what led to World War I.  I read it in high school and loved it.  It's not a tome, if I recall, but a clearly written, concise and witty story of what happened and why.


Offline Kurt Steiner

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 273
    • View Profile
Re: Why did Russia go to war in WW1?
« Reply #33 on: February 11, 2007, 12:47:51 PM »
Some general bibliography on the issue, just in case

The Origins of the First World War / Ruth Hening; London [etc.] : Routledge, 1989

The First World War / John Keegan; New York : Alfred A. Knopf, 1999 (although I do not agree with his vision, but it's a good reading if you can skip some biased comments)

Forgotten victory : The First World War : myths and realities / Gary Sheffield; London : Headline, 2001 (I'm in love with that book, I can't help...)

Offline Martin

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 29
    • View Profile
Re: Why did Russia go to war in WW1?
« Reply #34 on: February 11, 2007, 02:59:42 PM »
Would WW1 ever have occurred if the ruling monarchs would have had more say in the matter? I thinks the roots of the war was popular nationalism which some monarchs had to ally with. In earlier days royalties were royals in their own right, which state they happened to rule was a secondary matter. That could change from time to time.

It is obvious that the Prussian-French war of 1870/71 would never have happened if Napoleon III and King William had been able to decide on the matter. Napoleon was forced by chauvinst politicians and William by Bismarck. WWW1 must have a similar background!

Offline Kurt Steiner

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 273
    • View Profile
Re: Why did Russia go to war in WW1?
« Reply #35 on: February 13, 2007, 06:36:29 AM »
Would WW1 ever have occurred if the ruling monarchs would have had more say in the matter? I thinks the roots of the war was popular nationalism which some monarchs had to ally with. In earlier days royalties were royals in their own right, which state they happened to rule was a secondary matter. That could change from time to time.

It is obvious that the Prussian-French war of 1870/71 would never have happened if Napoleon III and King William had been able to decide on the matter. Napoleon was forced by chauvinst politicians and William by Bismarck. WWW1 must have a similar background!

Bearing in mind how Wilhelm II was, perhaps the war would have not started in 1914, but in 1908... At least, it the issue depended just on him.

Offline James1941

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 399
    • View Profile
Re: Why did Russia go to war in WW1?
« Reply #36 on: February 25, 2007, 07:58:00 PM »
Anyone who wants to understand how the war began just when it did, and who was responsible, should read an excellent book entitled:
Europe's Last Summer: Who Started the Great War in 1914    by David Fromkin.
It is very readable. It takes the events on a day by day basis and breaks down how the people in each country involved reacted to events.


Offline Lyss

  • Boyar
  • **
  • Posts: 139
    • View Profile
Re: Why did Russia go to war in WW1?
« Reply #37 on: March 24, 2007, 10:49:31 AM »
Recently I've read a very good article about the trigger to WW I. It's only 26 pages long, but gives an amazing insight on the individuals concerning the outbreak of the war:
the German Kaiser, Moltke
the Austro-Hungarian emperor Francis Joseph, his foreigh minister Count Leopold von Berchtold and the chief of staff Conrad von Hötzendorff
the Russian emperor Nicholas II

(there are others mentioned too, but these are the most investigated ones)

The article is:
John STOESSINGER, ‘The iron dice: World War I’, in: John STOESSINGER, Why nations go to war ?, 1985, pp.1-26.
Never attribute to malice what can be adequately explained by ignorance or stupidity.

Alixz

  • Guest
Re: Why did Russia go to war in WW1?
« Reply #38 on: March 25, 2007, 09:24:29 AM »
Another interesting perspective is

World War I  - Opposing Viewpoints  from the American History Series.

It is a bit dry, but it offers the opinions of those who were there and who were both for and against America's entry into the war and also opinions on the Treaty of Versailles.

There is a great chronology in the back of the book which begins with Franz Ferdinand's assassination on June 28, 1914 and ends on July 2, 1921 when President Harding actually signed a congressional joint resolution declaring an end to war with Germany.

Interesting that the war ended in 1918, but the resolution was signed in 1921.

TheAce1918

  • Guest
Re: Why did Russia go to war in WW1?
« Reply #39 on: March 28, 2007, 10:22:01 AM »
Other than the Guns of August by Tuchman...I would have to say that one of the more recent editions relating to the Great War is

A World Undone: The Story of the Great War 1914-1918 by GJ Meyer.  It is a massive read, but well worth the plethora of facts and jam-packed stories/histories of nearly every event covered during the war.  I highly reccomend it. 
« Last Edit: March 28, 2007, 10:24:03 AM by TheAce1918 »

Offline danr55

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
    • View Profile
Russias cabinet members of 1916
« Reply #40 on: June 04, 2007, 12:37:59 PM »
Who was the minister of transportation between 1910- 1916 ??

Offline Taren

  • Graf
  • ***
  • Posts: 483
    • View Profile
    • The Chick Manifesto
Re: Russias cabinet members of 1916
« Reply #41 on: June 05, 2007, 12:49:53 AM »
I don't know if this is the right place, but according to Wikipedia it was Sergei Rukhlov from 1909-1915, Alexei Trepov from 1915-1916, and Eduard Kriger-Voinovsky from 1916-1917.

Offline nena

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2927
  • But every spring smells like you.
    • View Profile
St Petersburg -- July 1914 and Nicholas II's Council of Ministers
« Reply #42 on: June 25, 2008, 10:26:21 AM »
Why did Tsar Nicholas II and Empress Alexandra renamed Petrograd into St.Petersburg in 1914? 
-Ars longa, vita brevis -
Mathematics, art and history in ♥

Offline Forum Admin

  • Administrator
  • Velikye Knyaz
  • *****
  • Posts: 4665
  • www.alexanderpalace.org
    • View Profile
    • Alexander Palace Time Machine
Re: Petrograd----St.Petersburg
« Reply #43 on: June 25, 2008, 10:41:56 AM »
Because Petersburg is a German name, and since the Germans were the enemy in the war, they gave it the purely Russian name of Petrograd, which means the same thing. "Peter's City"


Offline nena

  • Velikye Knyaz
  • ****
  • Posts: 2927
  • But every spring smells like you.
    • View Profile
Re: Petrograd----St.Petersburg
« Reply #44 on: June 25, 2008, 10:47:03 AM »
THANK you, FA, so much!  ;) I have always wondered why.......
Peter-name of Russian Emperor
grad--city
Petrograd--Peter's city.
Problem solved!
-Ars longa, vita brevis -
Mathematics, art and history in ♥