Author Topic: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship  (Read 15781 times)

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Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship
« Reply #15 on: August 05, 2005, 09:49:50 AM »
Thanks for the info you guys. Doesn't look like they were closer than third cousins.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Prince_Lieven »
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Offline RomanovFan

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Re: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship
« Reply #16 on: August 06, 2005, 01:42:36 AM »
And first cousins in-law:

Queen Victoria----Victoria m. Frederick III----Wilhelm II
Queen Victoria----Alice m. Ludwig of Hesse----Alix (AF) m. Nicholas II
~LESLIE~

ROMANOV FAN SINCE 1997

Offline cimbrio

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Re: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship
« Reply #17 on: August 11, 2005, 11:02:37 AM »
Royalty often refer to each other as "cousin" even if they're not strictly cousins, not even first cousins. However, Alexandra was Wilhelm II's cousin so it's fairly normal of Nicholas to call address the last Kaiser like that (it was also common in those times to call your brother-in-law "my brother" and so on, for instance). Plus, since Alexandra and Nicholas shared several cousins too, it doens't surprise me they called some relations "uncle" and "aunt" even if they weren't.

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship
« Reply #18 on: August 11, 2005, 11:09:17 AM »
Quote
Royalty often refer to each other as "cousin" even if they're not strictly cousins, not even first cousins. However, Alexandra was Wilhelm II's cousin so it's fairly normal of Nicholas to call address the last Kaiser like that (it was also common in those times to call your brother-in-law "my brother" and so on, for instance). Plus, since Alexandra and Nicholas shared several cousins too, it doens't surprise me they called some relations "uncle" and "aunt" even if they weren't.


Yes, you're right. Like how Alix of Denmark would have addressed QV as 'Mama' and so on.
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
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Offline cimbrio

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Re: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship
« Reply #19 on: August 11, 2005, 02:30:22 PM »
Yes, and I find that not only royalty does that, for I've heard my own relatives do it..and nothing too royal about us :P

Jebediha

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Re: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship
« Reply #20 on: November 23, 2008, 04:23:58 AM »
What was the reaction to the killing of the romanovs from Kaiser Vilhelm ?: Did he care or say anyting.



Offline HerrKaiser

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Re: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship
« Reply #21 on: November 23, 2008, 11:32:12 AM »
He, as well as the larger percent of royality throughout Europe, were quite concerned the same fate would befall themselves. William was also quite saddened by the murders. He had sent a special rescue team into the interior of Russia to attempt a rescue of Ella and assist in the rescue of the Romanovs, but of course they were unsuccessful, but came close.
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Offline Adagietto

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Re: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship
« Reply #22 on: November 23, 2008, 01:50:13 PM »
It was a bit late by then to feel sorry about it or to worry about the precedent; it was he and the highest German authorities who had sealed their fate by allowing Lenin through into Russia, with full awareness of his political aims.

Offline HerrKaiser

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Re: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship
« Reply #23 on: November 23, 2008, 03:16:45 PM »
I agree that while William allowed Lenin to traverse across Germany in the "sealed train" to get to Russia, knowing full well that Lenin was intent on overthrowing the government, it is not fair from a historical perspective to imply that the Kaiser (or anyone else) would have had knowledge that the murderous rampage the Romanovs experienced was the plan. In fact, it wasn't the plan even in Lenin's mind at the point he crossed Germany.

Plus, if we look at current politics and the global notion of free passage, I doubt an American president or any of the leaders of western Europe, for example, would deny an outspoken opponent of the Taliban a safe journey across any of their nations.
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Offline Adagietto

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Re: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship
« Reply #24 on: November 23, 2008, 05:14:34 PM »
I suspect the Kaiser had little comprehension of the power of political ideas, how they can lead to a revaluation or overturning of all accepted notions, with far more potent effect than the mere passing chaos that he was envisioning for an enemy nation.

I seem to remember reading somewhere that the Germans did offer (or were willing to offer) refuge to the Romanovs, naturally an offer that would have been almsot possible to accept, even if it had been practicable.

Offline HerrKaiser

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Re: Hohenzollerns & Romanovs--relationship
« Reply #25 on: November 24, 2008, 10:19:14 AM »
I suspect the Kaiser had little comprehension of the power of political ideas, how they can lead to a revaluation or overturning of all accepted notions, with far more potent effect than the mere passing chaos that he was envisioning for an enemy nation.


This is true, and neither did any other of the world leaders at the time. The bolsheviks took the world stage by surprise, for all intents and purposes, especially their extreme tactics and infiltrations into the worker-classes. That is largely the reason the shock wave of bolshevik terror was felt worldwide and for example, in the U.S., immediate programs such as the General Intelligence Division, were put in place to act as a sheild against similar intrusions.
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