Author Topic: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)  (Read 253364 times)

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Offline Kevin From Australia

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2005, 09:02:23 AM »
This is from an article John Wimbles wrote on Marie that appeared in Royalty Digest April 2001 -  It is a quote froma letter of Marie's to her eldest daughter.
"Naturally, good Aunt Alix out of false sentimentality, said she did not wish to be called Queen as long as she was at Osborne.  Too naif for words! But so they are here.  One would really think one was living among a pack of babies."

It is an excellent article as are all John Wimbles's, but now this has become a Marie Edinburgh thread instaed of a Alix Wales - so I stop!!!
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Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #16 on: July 26, 2005, 09:48:33 AM »
On the topic of 'favourites', I beleive I once read that Leopold was Alix's favourite brother-in-law. He was only ten when Bertie married her. Perhaps he developed a crush? Didn't Affie hope that Bertie would turn her down so he could have her? I've sometimes read that it was only Alix's popularity in the late 1860s that stemmed the tide of republicanism in Britain.
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Alicky1872

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #17 on: July 26, 2005, 06:14:05 PM »
Quote
On the topic of 'favourites', I beleive I once read that Leopold was Alix's favourite brother-in-law. He was only ten when Bertie married her. Perhaps he developed a crush?.


When Alix first arrived in England, Leopold was one of the first to greet her, holding a bouquet of flowers. Alix surprised everyone by rushing up to the little boy, and picking him up in her arms. Imagine what Alix must have appeared like to Leo...he hadn't had the easiest of lives, with his illness, and the often harsh comments from his mother, then sudden loss of his father, and his mother's tormented grief! Alix's arrival was a breath of fresh air which the family and the whole country sorely needed. Imagine Alix with her childish sense of fun, I'm sure Leopold enjoyed every minute with her, and vice versa.


Quote
Didn't Affie hope that Bertie would turn her down so he could have her?


Yes, Affie did have a huge crush on Alix!  ;D So much so, that Queen Victoria had him sent away because she was worried things between the two would grow too heated! (On his part anyway.) And this was after Alix and Bertie were already married! At first, when Bertie was dithering over becoming engaged to Alix, Affie made no secret of the fact that HE would be more than happy to take Alix off Bertie's hands!  ;)

Quote
I've sometimes read that it was only Alix's popularity in the late 1860s that stemmed the tide of republicanism in Britain.


It was Alix's popularity, and Bertie's recovery from typhoid in 1871 (and the service of Thanksgiving which followed in 1872) which did A LOT to save the monarchy, in my opinion. Bertie being so close to death made many (QV included, I think) realise what they could have lost. It was almost a redemption, albeit a temporary one, from the negative press/scandals that his name had become associated with.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Alicky1872 »

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #18 on: July 27, 2005, 07:46:14 AM »
Thanks for your contribution, Mrs Eddy. This is indeed an interesting topic. I was wondering if anyone knew how close Alix was to her brother Frederik, or her youngest sister Thyra? Anyone have any idea?
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bluetoria

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2005, 08:18:38 AM »
 I think Alix had style & charm & was a great Queen, but as a person I think she lacked depth. Some of her comments about Thora of Schleswig-Holstein & the Edinburghs were very cutting & rather cruel. Here is what others said of her:

Drino:

She was so jealous of the English Royal Family that she never asked any of her English sisters-in-law to Sandringham, whereas she would fill the place with her Danish relations.

Queen Victoria :

...Spoils [her children] terribly.

...Is unfortunately most unreasonable and injudicious about her children.

...Is like a distinguished lady of society but nothing more

...Is quite a daughter to me.

...Is rather stiff and cold, and not what people are accustomed to.

...She is dear and good and gentle but looking very thin and pale

...I am sorry too for Bertie; I don’t think she makes his home comfortable; she is never ready for breakfast – not being out of her room till 11 often, and Bertie breakfasts alone and then she alone.

...so dear and sweet. She is a most loveable creature.

...A pattern of self-denial

...Is not clever and her feelings are so anti-German and yet so little really English that she is no real help – good, kind, dear as she is and much as I love her.

...Does not dress her hair to advantage just now, too high and pointed & close at the sides for her small head.

KR:  

She is 51 years old but looks 30. she is marvellously slim and her bright kind smile creates an enchanting impression.

Marie Mallett:

Her restlessness is alarming and her one idea is to be constantly travelling, she looks ill, so do her daughters, and I hear she dreads the possibility of reigning.  

Vicky:

“She is the sweetest girl who ever lived, and full of life and spirits…She has always been strong and healthy as possible and has never ailed anything in her life except having the measles…I own Princess A. of Holstein is the only one of these princesses for whom I feel portée – it would be dreadful if this  pearl went to the horrid Russians.”

I know she is not brilliant in mind or conversation but I respect her and look to her as she is so thoroughly good, straightforward and unaffected, so equal in temper, so pure in mind. She hides under a little stiff manner, the kindest heart…

To be intimate with her, one must see much of her; she never makes advances of her own and has nothing overflowing or warm or tender about her relations with others and yet she is kind and good and affectionate, and one cannot be in the house with her without loving her. She is never maussade or out of temper or cross or impatient; her household are very fond of her.

Princess Alice:

How glad I am to hear you praise dear Alix! She is so good tactvoll and true. I love her very much.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by bluetoria »

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2005, 01:53:08 PM »
Yes, I do beleive she was very cruel about poor Thora. And whenever a suitor was proposed for Toria she would appear to agree, and then later protest that she hadn't heard a word of the conversation. She never had much a rapport with Queen Mary, but then again none of George's family did except Maud and QV. I don't think she ever really left Denmark behind. They were such a close-knit family.
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Offline Grace

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #21 on: July 28, 2005, 02:21:54 AM »
Quote
Well, not all QV's daughters-in-law where as horrible as Marie. She adored the Duchess of Connaught, and it was her who set Leopold up with Helen of Albany. But I agree that Alix was indeed a lovely person. Has anyone seen the 1975 serial drama King Edward the Seventh (you might know it as Edward the King or In Victorian Days)? Alix is portrayed wonderfully first by Deborah Grant and then by Helen Ryan. It's well worth watching.



Yes, Prince, I have that series on DVD and it still hold up extremely well today, I believe.  Helen Ryan in particular is marvellous as Alix!

And like Kevin, seeing this series began my interest in the royals of this period.

Also, Bluetoria, your information on the family's various opinions on Alix is really interesting too.


Offline TampaBay

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #22 on: July 28, 2005, 09:23:30 AM »
Quote
On the topic of 'favourites', I beleive I once read that Leopold was Alix's favourite brother-in-law. He was only ten when Bertie married her. Perhaps he developed a crush? Didn't Affie hope that Bertie would turn her down so he could have her? I've sometimes read that it was only Alix's popularity in the late 1860s that stemmed the tide of republicanism in Britain.


Leopold of Albany was also Marie of Edinburgh's favorite brother-in-law!

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bluetoria

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2005, 11:04:55 AM »
...and the favourite uncle of the Hessians. He seems the sort of man whom everyone couldn't help but like.

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #24 on: July 28, 2005, 04:46:45 PM »
Quote


Yes, Prince, I have that series on DVD and it still hold up extremely well today, I believe.  Helen Ryan in particular is marvellous as Alix!

And like Kevin, seeing this series began my interest in the royals of this period.

Also, Bluetoria, your information on the family's various opinions on Alix is really interesting too.



I bought Edward the Seventh of VHS last year (not having the money for DVD [!]). Unfortunatley, I wasn't . . . around when it came out in 1975, but I think it still holds up extremely well nowadays. Annette Crosby is absolutely superb as Queen Victoria and Helen Ryan's Alix is charming and convincing - wonderful stuff. Back on topic, it seems that Alix enjoyed mostly amicable relations with her in-laws, but she was really closer to her Danish family. Was she fond of Nicky? Minnie was her favourite sibling.
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
-Sherlock Holmes

"Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."

Offline Grace

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #25 on: February 21, 2006, 02:33:54 PM »
I'm using this thread - the other takes too long if one wants to post and one does!  ;D

I'm pretty sure this may have been one of the photos Vicky sent to Bertie (and QV and Albert) too.  I had the idea it was the one where Albert claimed "from the photograph, I'd married her myself..." but I could be mistaken.

I apologise as I think this photo has been seen and discussed elsewhere but, frankly, it'd take my dial-up more time than I have to find it.  >:(

Offline Aliss_Kande

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #26 on: February 21, 2006, 04:25:22 PM »
On the last post on the old Alexandra thread, someone said something about a scar on her neck.  I don't mean to be a bother but could someone please give me a brief summary about it?

Offline Booklady

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #27 on: February 21, 2006, 04:40:30 PM »
Thank you Grace.  Indeed, there may be three or four photos that Bertie saw, or perhaps Vicky requested.  One answer might lie in Vicky's correspondence to QV on the subject of a bride for Bertie.

Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #28 on: February 22, 2006, 11:25:34 AM »
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On the last post on the old Alexandra thread, someone said something about a scar on her neck.  I don't mean to be a bother but could someone please give me a brief summary about it?

I don't think it has ever been conclusively explained but it was said to have been a scar that had resulted from a childhood illness; scrofula was one such illness that has been suggested and there were fears in some quarters that it might suggest tubercular tendancies and therefore prove an obstacle to her marriage to the Prince of Wales.

However, QV was assured that it was merely the result of a neglected cold, although I have no idea what that means - whether it was a medical procedure that was carried out as a result of the cold or something else.

Offline Grace

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #29 on: February 22, 2006, 01:20:01 PM »
For more information, Aliss_Kande, refer to the other Queen Alexandra thread.

The "scar" is dicussed in depth there.  :)