Author Topic: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)  (Read 251035 times)

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Offline Mary R.

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #600 on: June 06, 2007, 08:05:51 PM »
Just a few...
I always wonder what would have happened had Edward lived for several more years and she was consort during World War I. Any thoughts? ???

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"I shall be very disappointed," she remarked for the record, "if George doesn't come up again." Queen Mary upon hearing her husband was to ride in a submarine.

When asked the question of when her eldest son would return to the country Queen Mary said, "Not until he comes to my funeral."

Offline gogm

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #601 on: June 06, 2007, 09:12:27 PM »
I don't think it would have made much difference. By that time, the crown's power was largely eroded and the only one who could have moderated Wilhelm II was Edward's mother, not Edward and not George!

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #602 on: June 06, 2007, 09:42:31 PM »
Not really...I read somewhere that said if Edward VII lived at that time, there will be no war. Since Willy was absolutely afraid of his uncle (who was the mind behind the Entente blockade against Germany, and also no love lost between him and his nephew). Had both him & his brother-in-law Alexander III was still on the throne. The possibility of war would be dimmer still. Willy viewed both Nicky & Georgie as light weights compared to their fathers.  ???

Offline Mary R.

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #603 on: June 07, 2007, 02:49:06 PM »
I agree. The Kaiser did have an almost natural fear of his uncle. However, I was thinking more long the lines of war effort/nursing. In Pope-Hennessy's biography of Queen Mary, it cites that Queen Alexandra lacked organizational skills.  For example, during the Boer War it said her charity work was disjointed and her daughter in law was appalled at the lack of productivity. Has anyone else read anything similar?

Mary R.
"I shall be very disappointed," she remarked for the record, "if George doesn't come up again." Queen Mary upon hearing her husband was to ride in a submarine.

When asked the question of when her eldest son would return to the country Queen Mary said, "Not until he comes to my funeral."

Offline Duke of New Jersey

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #604 on: June 07, 2007, 02:55:26 PM »
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Since Willy was absolutely afraid of his uncle


That seems like an overstatement... Willy did not really respect any foreign monarch.  There were may times Wilhem tried to foil Edward's travels and his plans, he was definatley not afraid of Edward.     

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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #605 on: June 07, 2007, 04:10:24 PM »
I agree it seems rather an overstatement. There were so many forces, many having nothing to do with royal personalities or relationships, that I don't think Edward VII living a while longer could've prevented WW1. I don't even know how much Wilhelm II 'feared' his uncle--while he was Prince of Wales, Wilhelm often went out of his way to 'tweak' his uncle and cause him public embarassment--even knowing that he'd hear about it from his grandmother.

As for Queen Alexandra, she was great at the personal interaction with the wounded, etc...but, yes, organizational efforts weren't her forte.
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Offline Duke of New Jersey

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #606 on: June 07, 2007, 04:26:00 PM »
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Wilhelm often went out of his way to 'tweak' his uncle and cause him public embarassment

When Edward was King:
-Running to Italy after Edward
-Running to Paris after Edward
-Running to Algeris
-Beating Edward at Cowes

Just to name a few...Afraid of Edward, no.

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Offline Duke of New Jersey

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #607 on: June 07, 2007, 04:33:38 PM »
I read about this in "The Edwardian Age":

Paraphrase:
Dagmar had come to England and Christopher of Greece was also there.  Dagmar was feeling sad about something so Alexandra dressed Christopher of Greece in one of Queen Victoria's dresses from when she met Nap. III and Empress Eugenie (this was the 1850's, the huge multi-layered skirts with bonnets, bows, ribbons and the like!) and walked him into Dagmar's room at Buckingham Palace announced as HM Queen Victoria and all of them had a good chuckle.  The servants were shocked. 

This seems like something Alexandra would do!  What fun!

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Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #608 on: June 07, 2007, 08:30:44 PM »
I think Willy was really afraid of his Uncle Bertie since he was lacked his posh in politics. Also he knew that after he became king, his anti-German stance would have more of an outing. The fact Edawrd VII pushed Britian into the arms of France by his many trips and efforts with potlicians was to sent shivers down Willy's back. Another fact is that King Edward VII waited until the last years of his reign to make a state visit to Germany was not lost on the Kaiser. Another fact that his Queen, Alexandra was also ant-German was also known to Willy (even though he was an ardent admirer of his beautiful aunt). However once George V came to the throne it was different. Georgie was not an "international intriguer" like his father and remained more at home. With a pro-German queen (Queen Mary relished her German roots and kept up contact with her Aunt Augusta of Mecklenburg-Strelitz even during WWI) this time, Willy seemed less stressed that they would go on the offensive. However by that time, Bertiie's grandwork had already taken effect (despite who is on the throne).  :(

Offline Mary R.

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #609 on: June 07, 2007, 09:21:14 PM »
I don't think Queen Mary was necessarily pro-German. She certainly relished her German roots but was deeply patriotic when it came to Britain.

Mary R.
"I shall be very disappointed," she remarked for the record, "if George doesn't come up again." Queen Mary upon hearing her husband was to ride in a submarine.

When asked the question of when her eldest son would return to the country Queen Mary said, "Not until he comes to my funeral."

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #610 on: June 07, 2007, 11:06:07 PM »
I think she had a harder time cutting her German past than Queen Alexandra, who saw it as revenge for Denmark loses of the Duchies. However, it is not to say that she was unpatrotic to GB, but she it is just not easy. Also her love of her Germanic roots was passed to her eldest son Edward VIII, who enjoyed speaking German (her brother Bertie did not share that love).  ???

Offline Eddie_uk

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #611 on: June 08, 2007, 01:34:39 AM »
What evidence is there to suggest May loved her German roots? She was certainly very pro english as several quotes in JPHs biography show.
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Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925)
« Reply #612 on: June 08, 2007, 01:40:51 AM »
The fact that she corresponded with her German Aunt Augusta during the war was enough prove. Adter WWI, she did later renewed her ties with her German relatives. In contrast, Queen Elisabeth of Belgium said of her German (Bavarian) family during the war" It is finished between me and them. Now there will be an iron curtain that divides us that cannot be lifted." She used the word "iron curtain" years before Chuchill coined it.  :-\