Author Topic: Savoia-Aosta  (Read 122074 times)

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Offline Marc

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #15 on: February 15, 2006, 06:52:28 AM »

Offline Marc

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2006, 06:57:38 AM »

Offline Marc

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2006, 06:58:45 AM »
And one of Luigi,Duke of Abruzzi!

Offline Frederika

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #18 on: February 18, 2006, 05:32:34 PM »
was Princess Olga going to marrie a member of the Italian royal family.

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #19 on: February 18, 2006, 07:36:17 PM »
You mean Prince Micheal 's daughter ?

Offline Paula

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #20 on: February 21, 2006, 04:01:35 PM »
Hello!  I am American of Serbian descent, and recently learned of the Duke of the Abruzzi's role in evacuating the Serbian Army during wwI.  I'm tracking down a legend that he married into the family of a friend of mine, Fiordelisi, just prior to beginning his mountaineering career.  I can find nothing of her on the Net.  Does anyone have any information?

Offline Prince_Christopher

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #21 on: February 22, 2006, 10:07:39 PM »
Princess Olga of Greece



Olga with her fiance, Prince Aimone of Savoy-Aosta

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Prince_Christopher »
Anyone who has a library and a garden wants for nothing.
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Offline Prince_Christopher

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #22 on: February 22, 2006, 10:21:57 PM »
Anyone know anything about the marriage?
Anyone who has a library and a garden wants for nothing.
--Cicero

Offline roimat

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #23 on: February 24, 2006, 08:17:23 AM »
I´m working for a greek magazine,and as far as i know,the wedding will maybe on May.It was planned for last October,but was posponned!Prince Aimone of Savoia-Aosta and Princess Olga live in Moscow,where the prince is working.

Offline frimousse

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #24 on: May 14, 2006, 06:51:25 PM »
Prince Aimone of Savoy-Aosta, born in 1967 son of Duke Amedeo of Aosta and Princess Claude of France ( daughter of Prince Henri of Orléans, Comte de Paris and Princess Isabelle of Orléans-Bragance)


He is engaged to his cousin the daughter of Prince Michael of Greece.


« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by frimousse »

Offline frimousse

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2006, 09:23:17 PM »
Prince Aimone of Savoy-Aosta and Princess Olga of Greece and Denmark, grand daughter of Prince Christophe of Greece and Princess Françoise of Orléans ( sister of Prince Aimone's grand father), great grand daughter of King George I of Greece and Grand Duchess Olga of Russia



Prince Aimone's paternal grand mother Princess Irene of Greece and Denmark was also the first cousin of Prince Michael ( Princess Olga's father)
Princess Irene was the daughter of King Constantine I of Greece and Princess Sophie of Prussia. King Constantine was the brother of Princess Olga's grand father.


So King George I of Greece is Prince Aimone's great great grand father. and Princess Olga's great grand father !!

King Constantine I of Greece is Prince Aimone's great grand father and Princess Olga's grand uncle...

Comte de Paris is Prince Aimone's grand father and Princess Olga's grand uncle.

I don't go back to Prince Waldemar of Denmark and Princess Marie of Orléans, because we will have a headache.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2010, 11:51:50 PM by Svetabel »

Offline frimousse

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #26 on: May 14, 2006, 10:33:19 PM »
Here is a photography of Prince Aimone's grand father and Princess Olga's grand uncle ( I have posted it in the French thread already).
Princess Claude of France ( Prince Aimone's mother) is standing the third from the right, behind her father.

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by frimousse »

Offline frimousse

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #27 on: May 15, 2006, 01:34:17 AM »
Aimone of Savoy-Aosta


Offline Seth Leonard

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #28 on: July 07, 2006, 06:50:25 PM »
Today HRH Amedeo di Savoia, who was till today the Duke of Aosta, has been declared the Duke of Savoy by a "Council of the Crown of Italy". His nephew is threatening legal action.

Documents pertaining to this happening are on Amedeo's official website: http://www.realcasadisavoia.org/index.htm.

For more information visit these links:
http://www.royals-portal.de/forum/index.php?showtopic=14163
http://members3.boardhost.com/Francoiberian/msg/1152298171.html

David_Pritchard

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Re: Savoia-Aosta
« Reply #29 on: July 07, 2006, 09:45:15 PM »
Ethiopia: Italy's Corner That's Forever Under African Skies (Part 1)
      
The East African (Nairobi)


ANALYSIS
June 26, 2006
Posted to the web June 26, 2006

RUPI MANGAT
Nairobi

THE ITALIAN MEMORIAL church stands quiet on a hill in Nyeri town in Kenya's Central Province. It is near the Outspan Hotel and the River Chania flows below in the valley that marks the boundary between the two historical relics. Silent souls lie in the church, enough to stir the curiosity of a visitor.

On May 18, 1941, unable to fight off the counter-invasion by the British at a place called Amba Alagi near Gondar in Ethiopia, the last Italian Viceroy of Abyssinia surrendered. The script reads a little like the Last Emperor of China, who returns to his place of birth in the Forbidden Palace in imperial Beijing, where no commoner was allowed to enter, ironically, as a commoner stripped of his royal privilege.

The last Italian viceroy of Abyssinia or modern day Ethiopia was called Amadeo di Savoia. He was from the royal house of Savoy and inherited the title from his father, the Duke of Aosta, to become the third Duke of Aosta. He was a royal by birth, as his great grandfather was King Victor Emmanuel the second of Italy. His cousin, Victor Emmanuel the third, succeeded to the throne to become the King of Italy and in 1936, Emperor of Ethiopia. After the overthrow of the Italian army, he had to renounce his title as the Ethiopian emperor in 1943.

It's almost 65 years to the day of the defeat that I stand in front of the tomb of the last Italian Viceroy of Ethiopia in this beautiful church. The black and white picture of the dead man placed by his tomb shows the handsome face of a man reputed to stand 6 feet 6 inches.

Father Luigi Brambilla, the Italian priest in attendance at the memorial church has been in Kenya for more than 40 years but was posted to Nyeri just a few months ago. He speaks fluent Kikuyu and reads through the story of the Duke to translate some of the events that led the Duke of Aosta to be buried in Nyeri.

"The Duke was captured by the British. But because of his rank and because he was related to the English royal family, he was offered a passage to England to stay there in exile," the priest explains.

The Duke refused the offer, stating that he preferred to stay with his soldiers. He was taken to a prison in Thika, then a nondescript hamlet but today a burgeoning town an hour's drive out of Nairobi. The Duke lasted a few months in prison as a P.O.W. but then fell ill, suffering from tuberculosis and malaria. The British once again offered him a passage out to England and once again he refused to go. He died in the concentration camp in Thika on March 3, 1942.

The church, set on a two-acre parcel of land, stands peacefully under the skies of Nyeri between the two massifs of the Aberdare range and Mount Kenya. Built in 1952 by the Italians, it is, as with everything Italian, of beautiful workmanship. The tree-lined driveway leading to the church passes through local Kikuyu farms. The church stands with the cross held high on its stern against a perfect blue sky with wisps of clouds passing by. Outside by the side of the church stands a wall with the names of the dead soldiers. They are mostly Muslim names, soldiers who fell in war. "They are buried outside because being of the Islamic faith, the Muslims would not accept being buried in a church," explains the father in his halting English.

WE THEN ENTER THE CHURCH. In contrast to the bright sunny day outside, the church opens through massive, beautifully carved doors into a cool and quiet, serene interior. There in the vaults against the concrete walls are the remains of the Italian prisoners of war, all 676 of them, with the last viceroy's body lying in the middle. Some are labelled "Ignoto Prigione," or "Ascari Ignoto" - the Unknown Soldier.

The very positioning of the soldiers imitates a real-life soldier's parade awaiting inspection. The commander of the soldiers, Il Duca Amedeo di Savoia-Aosta, Vicere d'Ethiopia, is buried next to the altar facing the soldiers buried in the vaults in the side walls.

Amadeo di Savoia was born in Turin on October 21, 1898. He died in a concentration camp in Thika on March 3, 1942 at the age of 43. He fought with distinction in the army in the first World War. With the wanderlust of youth, he left the Italian army to travel though Africa, only to rejoin it a few years later to serve under Marshall Rodolfo Graziani in the pacification of Libya. In 1932, he joined the Air Force. In 1937, he was appointed the Governor of Ethiopia after the Italian conquest.

He was appointed Commander-in-Chief of Italian East Africa in 1940, in which capacity he led the Italian forces in the East African campaign. He supervised the Italian conquest of British Somaliland and then the defence of Italy's African Empire. But the British retaliated, joining forces with patriotic Ethiopian soldiers, and Amedeo di Savoia was forced to surrender. He died shortly after in prison camp in Thika.

The Geneva Convention in relation to the treatment of prisoners of war, adopted on August 12, 1949 and put into force on October 21, 1950, states that all prisoners of war are to be treated humanely. By extension, this applies to the deceased. They deserve a decent resting place complete with the name, place and year of death.