Author Topic: Greek Nobility  (Read 21654 times)

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Offline Maki

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Re: Greek Nobility
« Reply #30 on: March 25, 2006, 09:46:46 PM »
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Quote from: Nicistratos  link=1123193423/0#9 date=1142815921
8)Alexander or Demetrios was the Embassador??

I think both Alexander & Dimitrios (of 1821 fame) were dead by the time Carol was King of Romania.
Regards
The Hon.  Xenia Stefanidou, Consul General of Greece in San Francisco, honored Alexandros Ypsilantis in a speech televised here today on the occasion of Greek Independence Day.  In a heartfelt speech in Greek and English, she described how the Greek war of independence began in Montevlachia, now Rumania, in 1821 and culminated in the etablishment of the modern Greek state in 1930.  Best wishes to Greeks and Philhellenes on the 185th anniversary of modern Greece!

Offline Maki

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Re: Greek Nobility
« Reply #31 on: April 29, 2006, 08:11:53 PM »
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The Ypsilanti family were originally Phanariot Greek Princes, that is, members of the Greek community in Constantinople during the Ottoman Empire and were heavily involved in the administration of the Ottoman Empire.

The Ypsilantis were in the 1700s "dynastic" governors (of what are today part of Romania and Moldova) of the principalities of Wallachia and Moldavia, and as such had the title of "Prince".

It is from the principalities in 1821, that, as leader of the Philiki Etairea, he began the Greek revolt against Ottoman Rule.  Unfortunately, his Romanian subjects, already tired of Phanariot rule by his predecessors, were not about to help him for the Greeks.  His invasion failed.
However, a few weeks later, his invasion would spark the revolt of the Greeks in the Peloponese and the Aegean islands,. who would follow his lead and the Greek War of Independence was begun.

Demetrius Ypsilanti, after whom the Michigan town was named, was Alexander's brother.

Their descendants, as Princes of Moldavia and Wallachia, would retain the title of "Prince Ypsilanti".
Regards

I found the following on my Greek calendar for today, April 29:  1900--Sto nao tou Amalieiou Orphanotropheiou vrethike i kardia tou Ypsilante se argyro docheio.  My rusty Greek makes this "The heart of Ypsilanti was found in the chapel of the Amalia Orphanage in a golden casket."  Well, this stopped me cold.  Do you know where this orphanage might be, and which Ypsilanti it probably refers to?

Offline Prince_Christopher

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Re: Greek Nobility
« Reply #32 on: August 24, 2006, 09:21:17 PM »
I have found some more references for this family:

Prince Gregorios Ypsilanti m. Baroness Helena Sina de Hodos

5 children, including 3 sons: Constantine, Emmanuel, Theodore, and two daughters,
Princess Chariclee Ypsilanti (1863-1912) m. (1882) Prince Philipp Ernest of Hohenlohe-Schillingfurst
Princess Iphigenie Ypsilanti (1869-1943) m. (1888) Count Albert zu Pappenheim

I think the family lived in Paris at one time, as the girls are listed as being born there.

Here is a link to a genealogy site about the princely Dadiani family, which the mother (Baroness Helena) was descended from.  Page down about three quarters of the way and you will find this family.

http://www.4dw.net/royalark/Georgia/dadan3.htm
« Last Edit: August 24, 2006, 09:26:46 PM by Prince_Christopher »
Anyone who has a library and a garden wants for nothing.
--Cicero