Author Topic: Charles I and family  (Read 47960 times)

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Offline Modena

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Re: Charles I and family
« Reply #120 on: November 06, 2005, 01:33:55 PM »
Quote



I don't know in what exact book I read it, but it was about French queens. It said that Liselotte had gone with some other women of the French Court to see the Queen of England, who had just lost a baby girl at birth (first days of January 1695).

About the 1686 miscarriage, I already heard about it. A son, wasn't it?


I don't know about the 1686 miscarriage, I just read a mention of it somewhere, so don't know what sex the child was.  :-[  Her very first pregnancy ended in miscarriage very soon after her marriage, so I'm surprised the sex of that child was determined.  

I never really saw mention of the sex of the children lost by miscarriage but somehow I got the impression the ones in 1683 and 1684 were sons. Not that sex matters, it's just so sad the loss of so many children.  :'(
That would make the total 14 pregnancies if all sources are correct.  :-/

Poor dear.  :'(



palatine

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Re: Charles I and family
« Reply #121 on: December 23, 2005, 02:02:23 PM »
Henrietta Maria’s funeral oration by Bossuet (in French):

http://visualiseur.bnf.fr/Visualiseur?Destination=Gallica&O=NUMM-87673

Minette’s funeral oration by Bossuet (in French):

http://visualiseur.bnf.fr/Visualiseur?Destination=Gallica&O=NUMM-87672

palatine

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Re: Charles I and family
« Reply #122 on: February 02, 2006, 12:45:57 PM »
(edited by author due to concerns about copyright)

Henry and Elizabeth met with Charles on the day before his execution.  Charles urged Elizabeth to remain true to the Anglican church, recommended books to read that would arm her against Catholicism, and gave her his last wishes and instructions for the rest of the family.  Elizabeth later compiled a narrative of their meeting.  Charles made Henry promise not to let Parliament make a king of him so long as his elder brothers were alive.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by palatine »

Offline LenelorMiksi

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Re: Charles I and family
« Reply #123 on: January 01, 2008, 01:13:23 PM »


These are the younger surviving children of Charles I (excepting Minette): Elizabeth, James of York, and Henry.  This is the oldest portrait I can find of Elizabeth; she died at fourteen, but her character still fascinates me.  From this picture she was no beauty, but I feel so sorry for her, as she had to live out her life away from her older siblings and parents.  At least she got to know her father before he died, but really I think she suffered the most from Charles' death since her mother got to live in freedom in France, and Henry got out of England to enjoy an admittedly short life on the continent.
Grand Duchess Alice of Hesse:  "Each year brings us nearer to the Wiedersehen [reunion with the dead], though it is sad to think how one's glass is running out, & how little good goes with it, compared to the numberless blessings we receive.  Time goes incredibly fast."

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Charles I and family
« Reply #124 on: January 01, 2008, 02:58:05 PM »
She seemed like a very brave girl - the burden of 'looking after' Henry must have been felt very keenly by her after Charles's execution, or even before. I imagine religion was a great comfort to her.
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Offline LenelorMiksi

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Re: Charles I and family
« Reply #125 on: January 01, 2008, 06:44:09 PM »
I don't know if Henry was a burden- I thought he was probably a comfort.  Elizabeth was six years old when her parents fled and her little brother was a year and a half. 



Margaret Dicksee painted this picture entitled "The Children of Charles I" in the 19th century, probably after Queen Victoria reinterred her remains and erected a monument in Elizabeth's honor.  I'm assuming it's Elizabeth sitting with Henry.
Grand Duchess Alice of Hesse:  "Each year brings us nearer to the Wiedersehen [reunion with the dead], though it is sad to think how one's glass is running out, & how little good goes with it, compared to the numberless blessings we receive.  Time goes incredibly fast."

palatine

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Re: Charles I and family
« Reply #126 on: January 04, 2008, 10:10:34 PM »
The church where Elizabeth was buried is in the process of being restored:

http://www.iwbeacon.org.uk/services_view.php?srid=45

You can find a good picture of Elizabeth’s tomb here:

http://newportparish.org.uk/renewalblog/?page_id=3


Offline Mari

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Re: Charles I and family
« Reply #127 on: January 05, 2008, 04:10:32 AM »
Very interesting article on Princess Elizabeth relating to the restoration of the Church. How sad that she and her Brother were separated from their Mother and siblings. The ill treatment that is mentioned...are there any specific examples?

Offline LenelorMiksi

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Re: Charles I and family
« Reply #128 on: January 05, 2008, 10:33:43 AM »
What a beautiful tomb.  Thank you palatine, I had been searching for pictures of it!

  As for the ill treatment, Alison Plowden states in The Stuart Princesses that Elizabeth's and Henry's various wardens actually treated them well, but the main tragedy was in them being kept away from their real family for so long.  I imagine they would have been much happier if they were allowed to join their sister Mary and aunt Elizabeth in the Netherlands. 
  However, when St. Thomas's church was rebuilt in the 1850's a Dr. Ernest Wilkins examined the remains and declared that Elizabeth suffered from a softening of the bones called rickets, and that their appearance indicated some deformity.  To my knowledge, rickets is caused by malnutrition.  It seems incongruous to state that she was not ill treated if she was not fed well enough to prevent malnutrition. 
Grand Duchess Alice of Hesse:  "Each year brings us nearer to the Wiedersehen [reunion with the dead], though it is sad to think how one's glass is running out, & how little good goes with it, compared to the numberless blessings we receive.  Time goes incredibly fast."

palatine

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Re: Charles I and family
« Reply #129 on: January 05, 2008, 12:25:11 PM »
To my knowledge, rickets is caused by malnutrition.  It seems incongruous to state that she was not ill treated if she was not fed well enough to prevent malnutrition. 

Elizabeth suffered from mobility problems and was a semi-invalid long before the civil war broke out.  Her freedom of movement was restricted after her brother James escaped during a game of hide-and-seek they were playing in the garden.  Lack of sunlight is a major cause of rickets.  It’s likely that the rickets made her mobility problems worse, which kept her out of the sun, which made the rickets worse.  Her gaolers’ decision to keep her inside as much as possible would also have made her rickets worse. 

Elizabeth wasn’t in a Louis XVII situation.  Her captors had good reason to keep her healthy, as happy as possible, and alive: her first cousin was Louis XIV; her brother-in-law was the Stadholder of Holland; and she was a cousin of sorts to the Danish royal family.  Throughout her imprisonment, there was a chance that her father or brother would regain the throne, which would put her in a position to reward or punish her captors.  She wasn’t starved or abused but I think it’s fair to say that she suffered as a result of the psychological blows she endured and because of the poor medical care in that era.  Even if she’d joined Mary in Holland, I don’t think she would have survived; I think that she'd been too sick for too long.  If Elizabeth had showed up in Holland, Mary's doctor probably would have killed a pigeon and put it on her head in an attempt to cure her, that's how bad doctors were back then.   As I recall, Alison Plowden said that Elizabeth contracted tuberculosis in the home of one of her captors.  I think Elizabeth was tubercular a lot earlier than that.  Her sister Anne died of tuberculosis as a toddler.  During his autopsy, Charles II’s lungs showed signs that he’d suffered from tuberculosis and had recovered; unlike Elizabeth, Charles had an iron constitution.  As the deaths (from smallpox) of Mary, Henry, and Mary II proved, the royal palaces were germ factories.  It's amazing that any of the Stuarts came out of Whitehall alive. 

It is a pity that most of what we know about Elizabeth was written by various and sundry misty-eyed people after the Restoration.  A lot of her history is a blank.  She seems to have been highly intelligent as well as capable of political manipulation and strategic planning.  She would have been a major asset to Charles II.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2008, 12:31:17 PM by palatine »

Offline LenelorMiksi

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Re: Charles I and family
« Reply #130 on: January 05, 2008, 05:34:03 PM »
I didn't mean that Elizabeth would have survived longer if she'd gone to Holland- I just think she and Henry would have been happier there with family.  I'm sure the medical care there was centered on bleeding like everywhere else in Europe at the time, which we know just weakens resistance to disease.  Probably having a dead pigeon put on one's head would be more beneficial than bleeding- at least then maybe the placebo effect could kick in. I didn't realize that rickets could be caused by lack of sunlight.  That makes a lot of sense, and tuberculosis was so prevalent a person weakened by rickets would be especially prone to die of it.
Grand Duchess Alice of Hesse:  "Each year brings us nearer to the Wiedersehen [reunion with the dead], though it is sad to think how one's glass is running out, & how little good goes with it, compared to the numberless blessings we receive.  Time goes incredibly fast."