Author Topic: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II  (Read 193522 times)

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Offline Eddie_uk

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #420 on: June 23, 2007, 02:39:30 PM »
Ah, Born to Rule - another of my favourites. If I was stuck on a desert island, they would be two books I would choose. Along with a multigym of course.  ;D
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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #421 on: June 23, 2007, 04:37:40 PM »

Mary became frustrated at the amount of time it took for Alexandra to vacate Buckingham Palace. She also was agitated at the amount of resistance Alexandra showed about moving out of Marlborough House before finally being convinced by Augusta.

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Augusta who?  Why did Alexandra need to move out of Marlborough House.

Seems to me Buck House (at least when I visted in 2000) would be large enough for Georgie Boy, Diamond Drawers, the six kids AND Mother Dear.

She needed to move INTO Marlborough House. Augusta was May's Aunt Augusta of Meckleburg-Stretliz nee Cambridge.

It's always a matter of actual living space, I think. Much of the rooms in various palaces have rooms for official functions, offices, staff rooms, etc...and then there are the 'living rooms'. I don't know how much space in each residence is actually given over to these rooms. I mean, reading some books, it seems there were a lot of live-in employees.  :P

Plus, it did come down to the orderly transfer of things. Minny was there to seriously 'gunk up' the works, otherwise I don't think the BP issue would've been a problem. Alexandra hadn't even wanted to leave Marlborough House (her London residence for 40 years) to move to BP in the first place! She was being asked to move back to her much-loved old home and leave a place she didn't even much care for but MF was telling 'oh in Russia, I wouldn't have to and you shouldn't either'. Once MF left, the issue was resolved pretty quickly.
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Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #422 on: June 26, 2007, 02:57:07 PM »
Somewhere, a while back, we discussed Alexandra giving away (or not) pieces of jewelry. This was from about 1917 to raise money for charity:





and from Toria:


G D Ella, can yotell me the source of these images?  I find the whole subject of royalty auctioning/selling off possessions fascinating.  I have been reading about the auction of George IV's clothes after his death, which fetched very little, and of course thre is the auction of Alexandra's clohes in th 1930s.  Where were these sold do you know?

Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #423 on: June 26, 2007, 03:01:53 PM »
Just a postscript.  Having, just read back my post above, I realised that as well as feeling slightly shell shocked, it being the end of the day with a small boy and a baby, the battery on my keyboard was fading hence the bad spelling and jumbled question.  I meant to ask where the jewellery was sold, not the clothes!  Sorry!

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #424 on: June 26, 2007, 03:38:41 PM »
It was a sale, held by Christie's, of various donated items to benefit various children's charities in June 1918. It was called the Children's Jewel Fund Sale and, in addition to Queen Alexandra and Victoria, many other women donated including the Duchesses of Marlborough & Roxburgh, the Countess of Essex and Lady Randolph Churchill. The illustration page didn't have further information since it was printed beforehand and thus there wasn't any information on prices or monies raised. I did go to the Times archive, however, and found that there was a catalog printed of the items, though 'several important lots' were donated after it had gone to print. The grand total raised was GBP 26,149 15s but, while it listed some prices fetched for specific items, none of those were of royal provenance.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2007, 03:43:18 PM by grandduchessella »
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Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #425 on: June 26, 2007, 07:54:44 PM »
Thanks for info... :D  I think it spared QA some spring cleaning costs. She had so many items (both real gems and (I heard) paste & artist jewels as well).  ;D

Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #426 on: June 27, 2007, 02:35:47 PM »
Thanks for the info G D Ella. Just as an update if anyone is interested, I am gradually tracking down more of Alexandra's clothes worldwide in various museums for my PhD.  Trying to locate the forty or so lots that were not bought by the Met in NYC from the 1937 auction is a challenge, but is proving fascinating.  Although the jewellery aspect is not my priority as I am a dress historian, it is still naturally such a part of the whole look that any info is great!  Actually, I am currently working on two of Alexandra's fancy dress costumes that are here in the UK.  If anyone knows of any references to either the Waverley Ball in 1871, the Marlborough House Ball of 1874 and the most famous Devonshire House Ball of 1897, I would be really grateful.

I already know about some of the texts such as Sophia Murphy's book on the DHB but any other suggestions would be very welcome.  Thanks!

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #427 on: June 27, 2007, 08:29:07 PM »
Would love to see Alexandra's famous early dresses with jackets , which she made popular.  ;)

Offline Mary R.

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #428 on: June 27, 2007, 10:07:44 PM »
...Trying to locate the forty or so lots that were not bought by the Met in NYC from the 1937 auction is a challenge, but is proving fascinating...

Were the dresses ever part of an exhibition by the Met?

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Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #429 on: June 28, 2007, 01:17:45 AM »
Yes, some of them featured in the exhibition about the origins of the Costume Institute a few years back.  I am not sure if there was a catalogue that accompanied the exhibition or if so, if any of Alexandra's dresses were illustrated.  They all date to the early 1900s. 

There were a few items from the 1860s in the auction but I have yet to find these anywhere.  I haven' found any other early pieces - the earliest well known dress is of course the wedding dress

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #430 on: June 28, 2007, 02:26:12 AM »
Maybe some in Denmark ?  ???

Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #431 on: June 28, 2007, 07:52:22 AM »
Maybe some in Denmark ?  ???

I haven't got around to contacting Danish museums yet, but I think you could be right.  I don't speak Danish and although I realise a lot of Europeans speak very good English, I always feel such a cop out by writing in my own language.  Must bite the bullet and get on with it though.  I have seen a very gorgeously illustrated catalogue of some of the other Danish royalty's dresses, including some of Alexandra's mother, from a Danish exhibition so it is entirely feasible that there may be some early garments there.

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #432 on: June 28, 2007, 07:58:25 PM »
Indeed ! I got a catalogue of Royal Danish dresses shown in an exhibition (included some from "Aunt Swan" and Alexandrine). The Danes were very proud of QA and checking up on their collection may yield some results. I just went to the Danish Royal Library 2 months ago and they have gorgours pics of the dresses woen in various functions. Good for me who likes to trace jewels and dresses.  ;)

Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #433 on: June 29, 2007, 05:03:03 AM »
Indeed ! I got a catalogue of Royal Danish dresses shown in an exhibition (included some from "Aunt Swan" and Alexandrine). The Danes were very proud of QA and checking up on their collection may yield some results. I just went to the Danish Royal Library 2 months ago and they have gorgours pics of the dresses woen in various functions. Good for me who likes to trace jewels and dresses.  ;)

Where is the Danish Royal Library Eric?  Sounds like somewhere I shold go sometime!

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #434 on: July 02, 2007, 08:30:18 PM »
It is in Copenhagen and housed in a new complex (ajasoned to the old building) called "the black diamond". I am thinking of moving to Denmark and do extensive research there.  :D