Author Topic: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II  (Read 193508 times)

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Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #450 on: August 03, 2007, 09:23:44 PM »
Guess Queen Victoria was right....Honiton Lace is better !  ::)

Offline Martyn

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #451 on: August 08, 2007, 08:01:10 AM »
Guess Queen Victoria was right....Honiton Lace is better !  ::)

Perhaps in her opinion.

I have read that the dress of Brussells lace that was given by Leopold was a dress that was much admired for its elegance and the superb quality of the lace with which it was decorated, but that the final choice of an English dress and the use of Honiton lace was considered to be a political and patriotic statement.

I am not an expert on lace, but I am sure that I have read that the quality of Brussells lace is considered to be superior to that of Honiton, despite the undoubted loveliness of the lace used on the dresses of QV and QA, all of which was re-used and treasured as heirlooms. 

Many aristocratic families had collections of hand-made lace that was considered to be valuable, and passed down through the generations, in much the same manner as the family jewels...............
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Offline Kate_S

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #452 on: August 10, 2007, 06:29:44 AM »
Guess Queen Victoria was right....Honiton Lace is better !  ::)

Perhaps in her opinion.

I have read that the dress of Brussells lace that was given by Leopold was a dress that was much admired for its elegance and the superb quality of the lace with which it was decorated, but that the final choice of an English dress and the use of Honiton lace was considered to be a political and patriotic statement.

I am not an expert on lace, but I am sure that I have read that the quality of Brussells lace is considered to be superior to that of Honiton, despite the undoubted loveliness of the lace used on the dresses of QV and QA, all of which was re-used and treasured as heirlooms. 

Many aristocratic families had collections of hand-made lace that was considered to be valuable, and passed down through the generations, in much the same manner as the family jewels...............

No Martyn, you are right, Brussells lace is considered to be of superior quality to Honiton.  However, Honiton is the most similar in terms of quality out of all the various British laces to Brussells bobbin lace.

Offline Duke of New Jersey

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #453 on: August 10, 2007, 04:14:39 PM »
Some pictures of the coronation day: (I hope these haven't been posted while I've been away, if they have then sorry)



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alixaannencova

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #454 on: August 11, 2007, 03:32:57 AM »
I vaguely remember reading somewhere that QA chose Pages rather than young ladies to be her train bearers at the coronation. Can anyone confirm that this was in fact the case and if so, were the Pages all the sons of Earls as I seem to believe? If this was indeed the case, does anyone know who the Pages were?

By the way, as an extra query, in 1911 Louise Fife made a fuss about her girls not being entitled to wear robes of 'de facto' Princesses. I have seen a photo of Princess Marie Louise, also a Princess 'by courtesy' of no where after 1917, wearing robes without miniver/ermine trim for the coronation of 1953. Would it be correct to assume that Alexandra and Maud of Fife would have worn similar robes for the coronation of 1911? I have never seen photos of the girls in their 1911 robes, only Alexandra in her robes as a real HRH as was, for 1937. I also wonder what robes Maud wore in 1937, as she had stopped being known as Princess Maud after her marriage, and her father in law was still alive, thus she was not entitled to wear the robes of a Countess? I guess the Lord Chamberlain must have issued a directive on the issue of the Fife girls, Thora and Louie and their entitlement to robes and coronets! Any piccies would be wonderful too!!

Offline Duke of New Jersey

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #455 on: August 11, 2007, 08:57:35 AM »
Here is a picture of Queen Alexandra and her pages:



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alixaannencova

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #456 on: August 11, 2007, 06:06:58 PM »
Thank you Duke of NJ for the piccie!! Very kind...now all I would like to do is identify the pages!!

I have found that QA' mistress of the Robes had eight pages to assist QA during the coronation....so I wonder which six are the ones trainbearing?

Right they were not all the sons of Earls though four of them probably were as per the details below....

According to the Times, those 'assisting' were -

J N Bigge esq - Only son of the future 1st Lord Stamfordham, who was PS to QV and later GV.

The 9th Viscount Torrington.,

The 7th Earl of Macclesfield - Grandson of one of Queen Alexandra's Ladies in waiting.   

The Marquis of Stafford - Heir of the 4th Duke of Sutherland

Honourable Edward Lascelles - Youger son of the 5th Earl of Harewood and brother in law of Mary, Princess Royal.

Lord Claud Hamilton - Youngest son of the 2nd Duke Abercorn

Honourable Robert Palmer - Not certain, but possibly the younger son of the 2nd Earl of Selborne!

Honourable Arthur Anson - 2nd son of the 3rd Earl of Lichfield

Can any one confirm who was who?


alixaannencova

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #457 on: August 19, 2007, 07:48:04 AM »
I have trawled through all the QA threads and am really suprised that there does not appear to be a single piccie of QA with Alastair Connaught! And I can only see one piccie of QA and her girls dating from after the Great War! Extraordinary! Does anyone know of have access to any other photos of QA with her girls and or Alastair? Considering Maud came to England every autumn after the armistice, there must be more piccies out there!

Offline Duke of New Jersey

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #458 on: August 19, 2007, 09:23:27 AM »
Are you looking for pictures of Alastair or Olav?

There were some pictures of Olav, Maud, Queen Alexandra and Toria on another thread.

alixaannencova

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #459 on: August 19, 2007, 10:01:05 AM »
I am really looking for pictures of QA 'with' Alastair and maybe even with Louise F and  Alix C. The 'Four Generations' photograph must surely have occurred? After all Alastair was QA's first great grand child, a family event certainly worth commemorating!

As to other piccies.....I find it extraordinary that there are no others of QA and her daughters (all four together) after the 1918 one with Olav and Maud Southesk taken at Marlborough House! I know I have mentioned this before, but I am suprised that Louise F does not feature in any 'family' pictures of the 1920s! Tres Bizarre! None either of her, Louise F with her grandsons either, though increasing ill health after her 1929 haemorrhage may have prevented her from being able to attend sittings! But what about Alastair?? He was fifteen in 1929!

Also, I know it may sound ghoulish, but does any one know when the last photographs of QA and her children were taken respectively?

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #460 on: August 19, 2007, 08:23:16 PM »
Well...Not a lot of them taken publicly as we know of, but there may be private snapshots. Frances Dimond is working on a book on QA, maybe some may turn up.  :)

Offline LenelorMiksi

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #461 on: August 25, 2007, 10:46:17 AM »
Wasn't her name Princess Alix of Denmark before she became Princess Alexandra of Wales upon marrying Bertie?
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Offline TampaBay

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #462 on: August 25, 2007, 11:02:48 AM »
Wasn't her name Princess Alix of Denmark before she became Princess Alexandra of Wales upon marrying Bertie?

I have no idea!!! I did not know if Alix was nickname or given name.

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Offline Aliss_Kande

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #463 on: August 25, 2007, 01:44:32 PM »
According to some very quick research on the web, I found out that Alix was born with the name of Alexandra.  Alix was simply a nickname she went by in family circles, like King Edward VII went by Bertie and King Edward VIII was known as David, etc.

Offline Grace

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Re: Queen Alexandra (1844-1925), Part II
« Reply #464 on: August 25, 2007, 05:45:15 PM »
Wasn't her name Princess Alix of Denmark before she became Princess Alexandra of Wales upon marrying Bertie?

Her full name was Alexandra Caroline Marie Charlotte Louise Julia, shortened to 'Alix' by her family.  Her niece by marriage, Alix of Hesse, was usually called 'Alicky' within the family to avoid confusion. 

The Alix we are talking about was born on December 1, 1844, in the Yellow Palace, Copenhagen.