Author Topic: Queen Tamara of Georgia  (Read 17879 times)

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blanche

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Queen Tamara of Georgia
« on: September 02, 2005, 12:43:19 PM »
Dose anyone know anything about this Queen?

georgecl

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Re: Queen Tamara of Georgia
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2005, 09:27:59 PM »
Hi
Queen Tamara of Georgia reigned from 1184 to 1212.
She was the ruler that introduced Christainity into Georeia. She was canonized as a Saint of the Russian Orthodox Church.

This award was introduced 1915 I think..
In the shape of a star insted of a cross because It was mostly
awarded to Moslems.



George
« Last Edit: May 30, 2009, 06:04:11 AM by Svetabel »

Offline Mike

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Re: Queen Tamara of Georgia
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2005, 10:40:22 AM »
The Order of Queen Tamara was established in 1915 as an award for members of the Georgian Legion, a voluntary unit within the German army, based in Turkey and commanded by General Leo Kereselidze. When in 1918 German troops were briefly deployed in Georgia, all their officers and soldiers were awarded this order. The star shape has nothing to do with its supposed issuing to Moslems.

georgecl

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Re: Queen Tamara of Georgia
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2005, 09:32:40 PM »
Hi Mike,

I wasnt too sure about the Moslem connention to the awarding of the award.
I read in the Werlich reference that it was designed with the Moslems in mind.? ???


Thanks
George
« Last Edit: May 30, 2009, 06:05:08 AM by Svetabel »

Offline Mike

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Re: Queen Tamara of Georgia
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2005, 12:11:17 AM »
George,
This is an interesting piece of info. While there're Moslem ethnic Georgians, they constitute a small percent of the predominantly Orthodox Christian Georgian people. Probably the legion was mostly recruited from Turkish citizens of Georgian descent, e.g. Lazes and Adjarians, who were all Moslems.

Offline Georgiy

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Re: Queen Tamara of Georgia
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2005, 03:27:42 PM »
Actually St Nina, Eaqual-to-the Apostles (also known as St Nino) brought Christianity to Georgia.

Offline Georgiy

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Re: Queen Tamara of Georgia
« Reply #6 on: October 06, 2005, 03:31:52 PM »
The life of St Tamara (from the Orthodox Church in America website):





Saint Tamara the Great, Queen of Georgia was born around the year 1165. She was descended from the ancient Georgian Bagratid dynasty and in the year 1178 she was a co-regent with her father, George III. The reign of St. Tamara is known as the Golden Age of Georgian history. She was noted for her lofty piety and, continuing the initiatives of her grandfather, the holy Emperor St. David III the Restorer (Jan. 26), she promoted the growth of Christianity throughout Georgia, and also built churches and monasteries. In 1204 the governor of the Ruma sultanate, Rukn-en-Din, sent a demand to the Empress Tamara that Georgia abandon Christianity and accept Islam.

The Empress Tamara refused this demand, and in an historic battle near Basiani the Georgian army defeated a coalition of Moslem rulers. The wise rule of St. Tamara won her the love of her nation. She spent the final years of her life in the Bardzia Cave monastery. She had a cell, connected with the church by a window, through which she could offer up prayer to God during church services. She died peacefully in the year 1213, and was numbered among the Saints.

The holy right-believing Queen Tamara of Georgia is commemorated twice during the year: on May 1, the day of her repose, and also on the Sunday of the Myrrh-Bearing Women.

Offline Georgiy

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Re: Queen Tamara of Georgia
« Reply #7 on: October 06, 2005, 03:34:27 PM »
While I'm at it, the life of St Nina from the same source:
Saint Nino, Enlightener of Georgia and Equal of the Apostles was born around the year 280 in the city of Kolastra in Cappadocia. Her father Zabulon was related to the holy Great Martyr George (April 23). He came from an illustrious family, and pious parents, and he was highly regarded by the emperor Maximian (284-305). Zabulon, a Christian, served in the military under the emperor, and he took part in the liberation of Christian captives from Gaul (modern France). St. Nino's mother, Susanna, was a sister of the Patriarch of Jerusalem. [Translator's note: In 1996, the parents of St. Nino were numbered among the Saints.The commemoration of Sts. Zabulon and Susanna is May 20].

When she was twelve years old, St. Nino went to Jerusalem with her parents, who had only this one daughter. By their mutual consent and with the blessing of the Patriarch, Zabulon devoted his life to the service of God at the Jordan, and Susanna was made a deaconness in the church of the Holy Resurrection. The upbringing of St. Nino was entrusted to the pious Eldress, Nianphora. St. Nino displayed diligence and obedience for two years. By the grace of God, she got into the firm habit of fulfilling the rule of prayer, and reading the Holy Scriptures.

Once, while tearfully reading the Gospel passages describing the Crucifixion of Christ the Savior, she wondered about the fate of the Chiton (Tunic) of the Lord (Jn 19:23-24). When St. Nino asked where the Lord's Chiton (Tunic) had gone (October 1), the Eldress Nianphora declared that the Lord's incorrupt Chiton had been carried off by the Rabbi Eleazar of Mtskhet and taken back with him to a place named Iberia (Georgia), and called the appanage (i.e., the "allotted portion") of the Mother of God. During Her earthly life, the All-Pure Virgin had received Georgia as her allotted portion, but an angel of the Lord appeared to Her and foretold that Georgia would become Her earthly portion only after Her Repose. She was told that Mt. Athos (also called the portion of the Mother of God) would be given to Her by God.

The Elderess Nianphora told her that Georgia had not yet been enlightened by the light of Christianity, St. Nino entreated the Most Holy Theotokos to grant that she would see Georgia converted to Christ, and might also enable her to find the Tunic of the Lord.

The Queen of Heaven heard the prayer of the young righteous one. Once, when St. Nino was resting after long prayer, the All-Pure Virgin appeared to her in a dream, and entrusting her with a cross plaited from sprigs, She said, "Take this cross, for it will be for you a shield and protection against all enemies both visible and invisible. Go to the land of Iberia, proclaim there the Gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ and spread forth His grace, and I will be your Protectress."

Awakening, St. Nino saw the cross (now preserved in a special reliquary in the Tbilisi Zion cathedral church) in her hand. Rejoicing in spirit, she went to her uncle, the Patriarch of Jerusalem, and told him about her vision. The Patriarch then blessed the young virgin in her deed of Apostolic service.

On the way to Georgia, St. Nino escaped martyrdom, which however befell her companions: the emperor's daughter Ripsimia, her guide Gaiania and thirty-five virgins (September 30), who had fled to Armenia from Rome to escape persecution under the emperor Diocletian (284-305). Bolstered in spirit by visions of an angel of the Lord, who appeared the first time holding a censer, and a scroll the second time, St. Nino continued on her way and arrived in Georgia in the year 319. News of her soon spread through the area of Mtskhet, where she lived in asceticism. Numerous miracles accompanied her preaching. On the Feast of the Transfiguration of the Lord, as pagan priests offered sacrifice in the presence of the emperor Mirian and a multitude of the people, the idols Armaz, Gatsi, and Gaim were toppled from a high mountain through the prayers of St. Nino. This was accompanied by a strong storm.

Entering Mtskhet, the ancient capital of Georgia, St. Nino found shelter in the household of a childless imperial official, whose wife Anastasia was delivered from infertility through the prayers of St. Nino, and she came to believe in Christ.

St. Nino healed the Georgian empress Nana from a grievous infirmity. After her Baptism, she ceased to worship idols and became a zealous Christian instead (October 1). In spite of the miraculous healing of his wife, the emperor Mirian (265-342), in view of the complaints of the pagans, prepared to subject St. Nino to fierce tortures. "At that very moment, when they plotted to execute the righteous one, the sun darkened and an impenetrable mist covered the place where the emperor was."

The emperor suddenly fell blind, and seized by terror, his retainers began to beg their pagan idols for the light to return. "But Armaz, Gaim and Gatsi were deaf, and the darkness only intensified. Then with one voice they cried out to the God of Nino. Instantly, the darkness was lifted, and the sun shone in all its radiance." This event occurred on May 6, 319.

Emperor Mirian, healed from his blindness by St. Nino, was baptized with all his retainers. By 324, Christianity had established itself in Georgia.

The Chronicles relate that through her prayers, the location of the Lord's Chiton was revealed to St. Nino. At this place the first Christian church was built in Georgia (at first a wooden church, but then a stone cathedral, in honor of the Twelve Holy Apostles, the "Svetitskhoveli").

At the request of the emperor Mirian, and with the cooperation of the Byzantine emperor St. Constantine (306-337), Bishop Eustathius of Antioch was sent to Georgia with two priests and three deacons. Christianity took a definite hold upon the land. The mountain regions of Georgia, however, remained without enlightenment.

St. Nino traveled with the presbyter James and one of the deacons, to the upper regions of the Aragva and Iori Rivers, where she preached the Gospel to the people. Many of them came to believe in Christ and receivedholy Baptism. Then St. Nino proceeded to Kakhetia (Eastern Georgia) and settled in the village of Bodbe, in a small tent beside a mountain. Here she led an ascetic life of constant prayer, and converting the local inhabitants to Christ. Amidst all these was the empress of Kakhetia, named Sodzha [Sophia], who accepted Baptism with all her court and a multitude of the people.

Having completed her apostolic service in Georgia, St. Nino had a revelation from God of her impending end. In a letter to the emperor Mirian, she requested him to send Bishop John, so that he might prepare her for her final journey. Not only Bishop John did come, but also the emperor with all the clergy went to Bodbe, where many healings took place at the deathbed of St. Nino. For the edification of the people who had come, and at the request of her disciples, St. Nino told them of her life. This narration, written down by Solomia of Udzharm, has served as the basis of the Life of St. Nino.

Having received the Holy Mysteries, St. Nino instructed that her body be buried at Bodbe, and then she peacefully departed to the Lord in the year 335 (according to other sources, in the year 347, at the age of sixty-seven, after 35 years of apostolic labor).

The emperor, the clergy and the people, grieving over the death of St. Nino, wished to transfer her relics to the Mtskhet cathedral church, but they were not able to remove the coffin of the ascetic from her chosen place of rest. The emperor Mirian laid the foundations of a church on this site in 342, and his son the emperor Bakur (342-364) completed and dedicated the church in the name of St. Nino's relative, the holy Great Martyr George.

Later, a women's monastery dedicated to St. Nino was founded at this place. The relics of the saint, concealed beneath a crypt at her command, were glorified by many miracles and healings. The Georgian Orthodox Church, with the consent of the Patriarchate of Antioch, designated St. Nino the Enlightener of Georgia as Equal of the Apostles. She was numbered among the Saints, and her Feast was established as January 14, the day of her blessed repose.