The Alexander Palace Time Machine Discussion Forum
 
 User Info & Key Stats   
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
July 24, 2014, 10:43:18 AM
460792 Posts in 8929 Topics by 14534 Members
Latest Member: kmk818
News: We think Pallasart is the best web design company in Austin and for good reason - they make this forum possible! Looking for a website? Call them at 512 469-7454.
+  The Alexander Palace Time Machine Discussion Forum
|-+  Discussions about Russian History
| |-+  Their World and Culture (Moderators: Martyn, BobAtchison, Forum Admin)
| | |-+  Designs by Worth and Other Haute Coutures Part I
  0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 24 Go Down Print
Author
Locked Topic Topic: Designs by Worth and Other Haute Coutures Part I  (Read 82903 times)
« on: September 14, 2005, 09:22:41 AM »
TampaBay Offline
Velikye Knyaz
****
Being TampaBay is a Full Time Job. Posts: 4223

View Profile

Empress Alexandra & Queen Marie of Romania both had clothes from "Worth".  What or who is "Worth".  Is it a "store" or is it a designer or is it a "Design House"?

Is it still in existance?

Where else did Empress Alexandra "buy' clothes for herself and her daughters?

TampaBay
« Last Edit: May 06, 2009, 01:42:23 PM by Alixz » Logged

"Fashion is so rarely great art that if we cannot appreciate great trash, we should stop going to the mall.
Reply #1
« on: September 14, 2005, 10:16:08 AM »
Robert_Hall Offline
Velikye Knyaz
****
a site. Posts: 6652

View Profile

Charles Frederick Worth [1825-95] was an Englishman who apprenticed as a draper, moved to Paris and set up a couture business [with a partner, I think]. His first VERY BIG patron was Empress Eugenie. He is famous for not only his gowns, "constructions" but also for being the first to use live models. He became the Winterhalter of gowns for all the royal courts. Even the Japanese Empress and I think maybe the Hawaiian Queen wore his creations. I am not sure how long the house lasted after he died, he did have 2 sons who worked with him. Certainly WWI  changed fashion as well as other ways of life and that type of clothing was definitely obsolete.
Logged

Life may not be the party we expected, but while we are here, might as well dance..

Do you want the truth, or my side of the story ?- Hank Ketchum.
Reply #2
« on: September 14, 2005, 10:33:21 AM »
TampaBay Offline
Velikye Knyaz
****
Being TampaBay is a Full Time Job. Posts: 4223

View Profile

Sir Robert, Lord Hall,

Thank you very much for this info.  I did not know for sure.  Did Charles Worth design other items such as shoes, handbags or jewelry?

Was there other designer "big at this time" 1880-1914?

TampaBay
Logged

"Fashion is so rarely great art that if we cannot appreciate great trash, we should stop going to the mall.
Reply #3
« on: September 14, 2005, 12:51:58 PM »
Tasha_R Offline
Graf
***
Posts: 250

View Profile

I know that Worth designed some perfumes - Je Reviens is one which may still be around.

Some more data for you, from an article by Eliabeth Ann Coleman, curator of the Brooklyn Museum:
"The House of Worth commanded international recognition through four generations of a garment making family and nearly a century, 1857 to 1956, as a maison de couture.  The Worth name is still remembered today through its perfume, Je Reviens."

Many are drawn to the founding father's creations - Charles Frederick Worth, 1825 to 1895, and sometimes ignore his equally talented son and design heir, Jean Philippe Worth, 1856 - 1926.

"Worth garments are generally characterized by their boldness of their fabric design, be it in silk damask or cut and uncut pile velvets.  What their articles lacked in design imagination - they more than adequately made up for in materials, color meldings, bravado of trim, yardage of machine made laces..."

Indeed, many of the Worth creations were very similar - it was their trim and fabric that set them apart from one another.  Many of the cuts were all the same.

Another article, by Otto Charles Tieme, gives some more history:

"In the autumn/winter season of 1857/1858, Worth left Gagelin-Opigez and joined forces with Otto Bobergh, a young Sweded who, like Worth, wanted to establish his own business.  A bold stroke launched their firm.  Princess Pauline de Metternich wore her stylish clothes with great flair and exerted much influence on fashion in the court of Napoleon III and his empress, Eugenie.  Worth persuaded his wife to approach the princess with an album of designs.  The interview was successful, and the princess ordered two dresses for 300 francs each.  She soon found opportunity to wear a particularly beautiful ball gown of white silk, woven with silver, festooned with toole, and decorated with daisy-like Marguerites.  Despite the melange of jewels, fans, and elaborate ball toilets in the candle-lit rooms at the Tuilleries palace, the simple elegance of Worth's creation was outstanding.  The Empress took note and requested that Worth himself come to see her the next morning.  In short order the young designer became Imperial Dressmaker and couturier to the court.  The Age of Worth thus began."

Regards,
Tasha
Logged
Reply #4
« on: September 14, 2005, 01:17:37 PM »
TampaBay Offline
Velikye Knyaz
****
Being TampaBay is a Full Time Job. Posts: 4223

View Profile

Quote


Indeed, many of the Worth creations were very similar - it was their trim and fabric that set them apart from one another.  Many of the cuts were all the same.




I have read that Empress Alexandra would order the same gown in many different fabrics when she found a style she liked.  This would fit in with Charles Worth and his style/method of designing.

TampaBay
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by TampaBay » Logged

"Fashion is so rarely great art that if we cannot appreciate great trash, we should stop going to the mall.
Reply #5
« on: September 14, 2005, 02:37:56 PM »
Tasha_R Offline
Graf
***
Posts: 250

View Profile

Personally, I think it's an excellent choice.  Think about it... most of the styles that folks see today as "Classics" are just that, classics, because they retain a specific style.  Tweed blazers, well-made A-line skirts, princess line dresses - they have a tendency to make one look their best.

Yes, this would certainly be the kind of stylistic thinking that Alexandra would have adhered to, and it makes sense.  Royals today do the same.

All the best,
Tasha
Logged
Reply #6
« on: September 15, 2005, 07:21:03 AM »
TampaBay Offline
Velikye Knyaz
****
Being TampaBay is a Full Time Job. Posts: 4223

View Profile

Diana also did this.  when she found an "off the rack" dress she like, she would purchase it in different colors and have it copied in different fabrics.  Verscase did this many times for Diana.

However, her dresser took her to task for doing this.  Her dresser did not always agree with the choices Diana made.  Then again Diana, like Queen Aklexandra, knew more than most designers and stylists added together.

TampaBay
Logged

"Fashion is so rarely great art that if we cannot appreciate great trash, we should stop going to the mall.
Reply #7
« on: September 15, 2005, 09:22:28 AM »
TampaBay Offline
Velikye Knyaz
****
Being TampaBay is a Full Time Job. Posts: 4223

View Profile

In 1857 Charles Worth together with Otto Gustav Boberg (1821-1881) founded a firm in Paris and two years later got the title "Furnisher of the Court " Representatives of almost all royal families of Europe commissioned dresses in the fashion house of Worth. The first ladies of high society and of demi-monde were the clients of Charles Worth. In the most successful years his firm was commissioned more than 5 thousand dresses. Worth was one of the first to start demonstrating his costumes on models, to publish them in fashion magazines such as "Harper Bazar" before showing designs to the public, and to "print" advertise with the name of his firm.

Charles Worth got commission from the Russian court. The morganatic wife of Alexander II Princess Yurievskaya, Princess Paley, Duchess Baryatinskaya and her daughters were his clients. The wife of Alexander III Maria Feodorovna commissioned her dresses in the fashion house of Worth for more than 30 years. She placed so much confidence in Charles Worth that sent orders for dresses by telegram, the fabrics and the style to be decided by the master. On display are 18 costumes made by Charles Worth in the late 19th century. Most of the dresses belonged to Maria Feodorovna and before 1917 were kept in the Anichkov Palace in Saint Petersburg. The right to be admitted one of the best works of Worth belongs to the dress of pale-yellow satin with velvet printed pattern made in 1880-s.

An interesting detail in a fashionable female attire of the late 19th century developed by Charles Worth was a dress with one skirt and two bodices. This dress could be worn in different situations for visits, as an evening attire or a dress for official ceremonies. An example of this type of universal outfit is an elegant costume of black satin with both a low cut bodice for evening and long sleeve bodice for day wear.

He did much more than I thought!

TampaBay
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by TampaBay » Logged

"Fashion is so rarely great art that if we cannot appreciate great trash, we should stop going to the mall.
Reply #8
« on: September 22, 2005, 09:09:27 AM »
TampaBay Offline
Velikye Knyaz
****
Being TampaBay is a Full Time Job. Posts: 4223

View Profile

DALLAS, Apr 15, 2005/ FW/ --- On July 6, 2005, the ladies of summer, together with the international fashion press will descend in Paris to witness the unveiling of the Fall 2005 haute couture collections.

This time, the season is back to 4 days, a piece of good news, especially because during the last two seasons, it was shortened to 3 days.

So, as we retrace our trek to Paris, we also retrace where it all began – 7 rue de la Paix, the location of Charles Frederick Worth’s atelier.

The year was 1858; two years after Charles Frederick Worth, considered the “Father of Haute Couture” formed a partnership with Swedish Otto Bobergh. An ironic situation, an Englishman and a Swede started what would be the crème de la crème of French fashion.

But it took Worth over a decade before reaching #7 rue de la Paix. The story started in England, when Worth was 13 years old and was an apprentice at Swan & Edgar, a London mercer establishment that specializes in ladies’ dress fabrics.

English fashion during that time was intent on perfecting tailoring methods. So, in 1845, when Charles Worth was 20, he moved to Paris and found that Parisian fashion was made up of female seamstresses who indulge their patrons in female frivolity.

Armed with his knowledge of fabrics and the English fascination with masterful tailoring techniques, Worth realized that aesthetics should be built on a solid foundation of excellent construction.

So while working at Gagelin, an emporium of the finest fabrics and shawls, he started to design dresses for Marie Vernet (who would be his wife), to wear while modeling the shawls for the clients.

The seed of an idea began in that shop. Charles Worth started designing dresses and by 1850, there was already a small “clothes” department at Gagelin selling Worth designs made from the emporium’s fabrics.

In 1851, Gagelin included several of Worth’s dresses during the Great Exhibition at London Crystal Palace. In 1855, one of his creations won a medal at the Exposition Universelle.

A year later, he formed a partnership with Otto Bobergh. In 1858, the House of Worth & Bobergh opened its doors. It would be the precursor to the House of Worth.

Ten years later, Charles Worth would form the Chambre Syndicale de la Haute Couture, which would become France’s fashion governing body. And the rest is history.
Logged

"Fashion is so rarely great art that if we cannot appreciate great trash, we should stop going to the mall.
Reply #9
« on: October 03, 2005, 06:34:42 AM »
TampaBay Offline
Velikye Knyaz
****
Being TampaBay is a Full Time Job. Posts: 4223

View Profile

Does anyone know which designers are dressing which Royals today?

TampaBay
Logged

"Fashion is so rarely great art that if we cannot appreciate great trash, we should stop going to the mall.
Reply #10
« on: October 03, 2005, 06:45:10 AM »
PssMarieAmelie
Guest

Well, I DO know that Philip Treacy makes hats for the Duchess of Cornwall........they are *cough*IMO not so wonderful *cough*
Logged
Reply #11
« on: October 03, 2005, 11:38:48 AM »
TampaBay Offline
Velikye Knyaz
****
Being TampaBay is a Full Time Job. Posts: 4223

View Profile

Norman Hartnell-The House of Hartnell.

I know he is dead but did his design firm survive his death?  Who currently designs for QEII?

TampaBay
Logged

"Fashion is so rarely great art that if we cannot appreciate great trash, we should stop going to the mall.
Reply #12
« on: October 03, 2005, 06:47:33 PM »
Prince_Christopher Offline
Velikye Knyaz
****
Posts: 1146

View Profile

A man named Hardy Amies also designed for QEII, although he has been dead for 2 or 3 years now, I think.
Logged

Anyone who has a library and a garden wants for nothing.
--Cicero
Reply #13
« on: October 04, 2005, 06:14:47 AM »
Martyn Offline
Moderator
Velikye Knyaz
*****
Martyn's Chips Posts: 7022

View Profile

I have tried, without success, to discover who is making the Queen's clothes at present.

Why it should be information that is not in the public domain, I simply have no idea, as previously both royalty and designers were happy to advertise their links.

As for Hartnell, IMO he is the most overrated fashion designer and chiefly responsible for pandering to Cookie's frumpy and antiquated notions of fashion.

Now Worth is another matter.........
Logged

'For a galant spirit there can never be defeat'....Wallis Windsor

'The important things is not what they think of me, but what I think of them.'......QV
Reply #14
« on: October 04, 2005, 01:03:41 PM »
Lucien Offline
Velikye Knyaz
****
Courtier Posts: 7307

View Profile

Quote
Does anyone know which designers are dressing which Royals today?

TampaBay


The House of Natan,Eduard Vermeulen,avenue Louise, Brussels is very popular with CrownPrincess Mathilde of Belgium and Princesses Máxima and Laurentien of the Netherlands.

By Nathan:
http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1074061975&str...

http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1073683835&str...

http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1073714582&str...

http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1073608245&str...

http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1071820883&str...

http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1071594337&str...

http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1071644566&str...

http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1071644562&str...

And Princess Máxima,by Valentino:
http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1072837912&str...

http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1072837908&str...

http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1072515905&str...

"Evita's" style....
http://www.seegerpress-online.de/seegerpress-cgi/topixx?op=preview&ID=1071597936&str...


« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by Lucien » Logged

Je Maintiendrai
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 24 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS! Website by Pallasart - Austin Web Design