Author Topic: Charles II  (Read 20184 times)

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Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Charles II
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2005, 09:22:50 AM »
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Royals can divorce these days so it's all right. Bad luck for Alois, though!


;D ;D ;D

Getting back to Charles . . .
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
-Sherlock Holmes

"Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."

palatine

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Re: Charles II
« Reply #16 on: September 25, 2005, 11:11:42 AM »
Here is a link to a short biography of Charles and a picture of the inscription in the floor of Westminster Abbey that marks his vault below:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=1975&pt=%20King%20Charles%20II

palatine

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Re: Charles II
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2005, 09:32:34 AM »
Madame de Motteville, one of Anne of Austria's ladies in waiting, described Charles during the Interregnum:

"The greatest heroes and sages of antiquity did not guide their lives by grander principles of action, than this young Prince at the opening of his career, but when he found that his struggles were doomed to failure, he sank into indifference, and bore the ills of poverty and exile with reckless nonchalance, snatching at whatever pleasures came in his way, even those of the most degraded kind. †So he gave himself up to lawless passion, and passed many years, in France and other countries, in the utmost sloth."

I don't know if Motteville was being entirely fair; Charles was involved with various plots and schemes for his restoration to power throughout the Interregnum. † Charles didn't make a very good impression on the French Court while he was there, which Motteville's description reflects. †He stammered and had difficulty speaking French.  He refused to discuss his political activities with the Dowager Queen, he horrified his cousin La Grande Mademoiselle with his taste in food - he preferred simple dishes like mutton- , and unfortunately, Lucy Walters and their illegitimate son were with him in Paris for a time.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by palatine »

Offline bell_the_cat

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Re: Charles II
« Reply #18 on: December 22, 2005, 01:53:54 AM »
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Here is a link to a short biography of Charles and a picture of the inscription in the floor of Westminster Abbey that marks his vault below:

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=1975&pt=%20King%20Charles%20II


It's not a very lavish tomb - does anyone know why?
Never put off until tomorrow what you can put off until the day after tomorrow. (Mark Twain)

palatine

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Re: Charles II
« Reply #19 on: December 22, 2005, 12:21:15 PM »
It was a Stuart tradition to leave the graves of family members unmarked by the time James II came to the throne. †Arbella Stuart, James I, Charles I, Mary of Orange, Henry of Gloucester, Anne Hyde, and several of James IIís children were laid to rest in unmarked graves.

James wasnít criticized for failing to raise a tomb to his brother. †James was criticized for interring Charles privately; the burial was held at night with a minimum of fanfare, just a procession of peers and members of Charles's household. †James could not hold a state funeral for his brother, due to Charlesís deathbed conversion to Catholicism, which was kept secret. †James didnít publicly reveal Charles IIís conversion until after he went into exile.

James did have a wax effigy of Charles made which was left standing over his grave. †The effigy was elaborately dressed. †In 1700, thieves broke into Westminster Abbey. †Among other things, they stole the clothes and ornaments from Charlesís effigy. †

The effigy was redressed in a simple suit, and left in place for many years before being moved for safekeeping to a glass case in another part of the Abbey.  It is one of the few wax effigies made in that era to survive the centuries.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by palatine »

Offline bell_the_cat

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Re: Charles II
« Reply #20 on: December 22, 2005, 01:11:48 PM »
Yes I've seen it! They also have Katherine, the wife of Henry V, and Elizabeth of York, if my memory is correct. :)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by bell_the_cat »
Never put off until tomorrow what you can put off until the day after tomorrow. (Mark Twain)

Offline imperial angel

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Re: Charles II
« Reply #21 on: November 25, 2008, 09:39:44 PM »
I never heard that story!  :o

Nell Gwyn was his most likable mistress, IMHO - she was never given a title, but rumour says he was about to make her Countess of Greenwich but died before it could happen.

I always liked Nell Gwynn. Like Charles, she was very witty. She was quite down to earth- had no trouble calling herself a whore for example in that famous story where she said '' But I'm the Protestant whore'' when her carriage was mistaken for that of Louise de Keroualle Charles's unpopular French Catholic mistress, and the crowd was surrounding the carriage and didn't seem happy. She was very popular with the English common people, and I agree not very into titles. Anyone read her bio published in 2004 or so? I did. Charles had many women, but like him she was down to earth, easy going and witty- perhaps she had the most common with him. She could never be a main mistress because of her common birth, nor her bio says I think have titles- or at least, it would have been unconventional.

Offline Mari

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Re: Charles II
« Reply #22 on: November 26, 2008, 01:58:46 AM »
Among Charles II last words to his Brother on his deathbed were to take care of Nellie! One of my favorite stories of Nell is the way she got a title for her Son.  Charles II had been hedging for some time in giving her Child a title.  So, Nell Gywnn  would call him by saying "come here you little Bastard" in front of Charles and when  Charles protested...."She said but my Lord what else have I to call him."

Offline imperial angel

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Re: Charles II
« Reply #23 on: November 30, 2008, 02:46:28 PM »
I like that one too. I first read that one in her biography and I laughed for awhile. She certainly had quite the personality.

Offline ilyala

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Re: Charles II
« Reply #24 on: January 10, 2009, 08:15:34 PM »
i didn't know that one :).

but i read a story of how nell held her son out the window and threatened to throw him unless charles gives him a title...
'loving might be a mistake, but it's worth making'
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Offline Carisbrooke

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Re: Charles II
« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2013, 01:54:40 AM »
THE ROYAL BARGE OF KING CHARLES II        On display at the Royal Navy Museum Portsmouth.

Built around 1670 it is said to be the oldest royal barge in existence. It is also notable because it was used at the state funeral of Lord Nelson.