Author Topic: Personal travel private trains  (Read 12681 times)

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Offline DOMOVOII

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Personal travel private trains
« on: July 14, 2004, 03:09:35 PM »
Could someone explain how the Royal families of Europe,not forgetting the Romanovs travelled across Europe with private trains, (incidentally could I clear up a second assumption; these were trains of carriages, not neccessarily with an Engine?)

Did you simply wire ahead to the next monarch at the next border and wait to be hitched to the next train going your way, or did the few who could regard it as their right? Must have made for awful delays for other rail users, was this the case?
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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2004, 05:22:13 PM »
They had their own engines as well. Even the wealthy non-Imperial Russian aristocrats had their own engines.

Offline DOMOVOII

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #2 on: July 15, 2004, 03:02:37 AM »
Many thanks Harald, that is just thie information that I was after. I found so little with regard to facts and figures, but then N wouldn't have thought much of it other than that he had the neccessary equipment as and when it was required. I've certainly not read anything other than a description of the carriages, their "rooms" etc.

Again thanks Harald, oh and Forum Admin!

Domovoii

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #3 on: July 15, 2004, 05:30:37 AM »
Harald, thank you for the information. Your "Standart" site is quite wonderful, and fills in many blanks on the subject of that beautiful vessel.

Sunny

Offline Mike

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2004, 07:13:31 AM »
In Russia, the whole intricate business of transporting the inperial family by rail was handled by the Inspection of Imperial Trains that was a part of the Ministry of Court. The Inspectors and their deputies were railway engineers from "good families" (Baron Shernwall, Baron Taube etc.) and usually carried honorary court ranks.

Their job was by no means easy. Russian emperors had a habit of keeping their travel plans tightly guarded even from trusted officials almost tiil the last minute. The reason was the illusory protection of their privacy, rather than security considerations. As a result, the involved officials - who really needed to know! - recruited paid informants among palace servants, and every "suspicious" packaging activity was immediately reported to whom it might concern.

Imperial trains were drawn by special engines only on suburb lines aroun SPb - to Tsarskoye, Peterhof, Gatchina etc. During long distance journeys, regular exchangable engines were used because steam locomotives needed to be cleaned and otherwise serviced every few hundred kilometers.

While senior grand dukes usually used "extra trains" composed of one or two carriages, it was quite customary - as noted by Harald - to have a personal carriage hooked up to a regular train. It was not unusual for the younger grand dukes just to book one or two 1st class compartments, especially for an overnight trip to Moscow or Helsingfors.

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2004, 08:40:25 AM »
I do know that the Princely Tarasov family of Moscow also had their own private train which they used to go to Kidslovosk, Petersburg and the Crimea.

Offline Mike

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #6 on: July 15, 2004, 08:55:30 AM »
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Ithe Princely Tarasov family of Moscow also had their own private train

Maybe, although it would be highly impractical from the technical maintenance point of view. It was quite easy - provided one had enough money and right connections - to order a private "extra train" for a particular journey; its carriages were railway-owned and maintained. And to book a private carriage within a scheduled train one needed to be no prince or other VIP: the service was available to everybody who wished to pay an officilally published tariff.

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #7 on: July 15, 2004, 09:56:31 AM »
The Tarasov family owned the Moscow-Tflis railroad from what I understand.

Offline Mike

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #8 on: July 15, 2004, 10:57:01 AM »
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The Tarasov family owned the Moscow-Tflis railroad from what I understand.

Well Rob, I regret to say that there was no such railroad :(... While the Baku - Tiflis - Batum line (state-owned) was built in 1883, it was connected with the main Russian network via Derbent - Vladikavkaz - Rostov only in 1900. And then a train from Moscow to Tiflis should have travelled along at least 5 different railroads, each with its own administration and ownership (most of them, if not all, were state-owned - kazyonnye).

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #9 on: July 15, 2004, 11:05:32 AM »
I guess the family "embellished" their memories.  ;)

Offline Mike

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2004, 11:25:00 AM »
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I guess the family "embellished" their memories.  ;)

As to their princeship, let me quote my favorite writer B. Akunin (whose real name is Grigoriy Chkhartishvili): "The only Georgian in Moscow who boasts of no princely roots - is me".

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #11 on: July 15, 2004, 11:29:23 AM »
From what I understand, theirs was pretty "real" nobility. Prince Tarasov was not Georgian, but Russian. His wife was Georgian. Henri Troyat is a  cousin, and they are mentioned in several of his works.  Their daughter Elisabeth was very close to GD Marie after the Revolution. I knew her well.
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Offline Mike

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #12 on: July 15, 2004, 11:39:38 AM »
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Henri Troyat is a  cousin, and they are mentioned in several of his works.

Moreover, Henri Troyat was actually born Lev Tarasov, but those Tarasovs were wealthy Armenian merchants residing in Moscow.

Offline Valmont

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #13 on: July 15, 2004, 12:29:45 PM »
I remeber reading the Yussupovs had two carriages, One for traveling within Russia, and another one at the Border for  Intercontinental traveling.

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Offline DOMOVOII

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Re: Personal travel private trains
« Reply #14 on: July 15, 2004, 02:22:48 PM »
So an occasion like Ernst and Ducky's wedding in Coburg must have ground the european schedules to a dead halt!.
A stand can be taken against an army of men, but no stand can be made against an invasion of an idea          V Hugo