Author Topic: The Peasant/worker in Russia  (Read 69529 times)

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Offline Belochka

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Re: The Peasant/worker in Russia
« Reply #195 on: March 17, 2007, 08:40:01 AM »
Wow Belochka.  I can't hardly believe you have that envelope containing a real decision by Nicholas.  It's too bad it was never opened because maybe there was something important inside and something went wrong because they never heard whtat the tsar told them to do.

tsaria I looked up what you meant about effluent.  Ewwww But it is very interesting they did that.

Don't worry Binky, the envelope was opened from the side to retain the seal and it is now empty of its original contents.

Margarita
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Offline Belochka

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Re: The Peasant/worker in Russia
« Reply #196 on: March 17, 2007, 08:50:46 AM »
... The closest I can claim is having looked into the eyes of a wonderful old man who looked into the eyes of his Emperor. ...  His eyes were, almost violently, blue too.   

... And to have a collection of kopeks - dating from late 19th and early 20th century - kindly gifted by Father (now Bishop) Markel.   These were discovered during the restoration of the Feodorovsky Sobor.

tsaria

I understand you, I can personally relate to the first but not to the second except like mine the eyes were green. The kopeks are a very special gift which I am sure you shall treasure because you appreciate what they meant. They were not just any random specimens.

Margarita
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Offline AGRBear

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Re: The Peasant/worker in Russia
« Reply #197 on: March 17, 2007, 05:11:41 PM »
You are making me confused agrbear.  You said you are looking at all these stats and census figures but you just told zvadeza that too much stats make you miss the truth.  Then some other poster on another thread said that Russia government policies in 1890s were chahnged to be against labor but you say the policies were favorable.  Its nice to know the name of all those people living in your ancestors households.  I would like to know the same from my family but it confuses me what that means about anything.

Dear Binky,

I did not mean to confuse you.

zvadeza and I have been having a go-around about the differences of facts found in his communist history books as compared to my western written books and in  my own family history which  contradicts his communist history which at times seems to twist the truth as well as  eliminate many truths of what occured in Russia between Lenin and the fall of the Berlin Wall.   I did not mean that one should never look at stats.

When I mentioned my family this time,  I was speaking about the census and my personal view of  the census I've read while researching my family genealogy.

I am greatly interested in true stories about Russian families and how they lived.   History is a collection of stories, no matter how unimpotant they seem. 

Quote
1890s
>>It was not until the closing decades of the nineteethy century that Russia entered the industrial age.  Only then, under the impact of favorable goverment politices, did traditional Russian soceity begin to undergo a rapid transfromation.  Vast rual areas were soon converted into factory villages, and urban centers expanded to absorb new factories, shops, and residential districts.  But most significant of all, a new and greatly enlgarge workign population was formed as tens of thousands of peasants migrated from country side, forwaking their plows for jobs in cities and town."<<
p. 1 in THE RUSSIAN WORKER, LIFE AND LABOR UNDER THE TSARIST REGIME by Victoria E. Bonnell.

A number of policies allowed this to occur.

Not all the policies under Alex. III or his son Nicholas II were bad.

AGRBear

PS  It appears posters are talking about  Nicholas II and the royal mail  on two threads.   Not sure I should ask my next question???


   
« Last Edit: March 17, 2007, 05:31:26 PM by AGRBear »
"What is true by lamplight is not always true by sunlight."

Joubert, Pensees, No. 152

Offline Binky

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Re: The Peasant/worker in Russia
« Reply #198 on: March 18, 2007, 04:04:54 AM »
Oh I agree with you AGRBear.  History is a lot more about what families think than all those communists and people who write history books.  It really is just a collection of stories but that is hard for most people to understand.  I know different families have stories that are different from other families.  Like black people in America think things are not so good but white families mostly think things get done right.  They are all both right.  Things are good and bad. it depends on what your family thinks a lot of times.

Offline ChristineM

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Re: The Peasant/worker in Russia
« Reply #199 on: March 21, 2007, 07:59:17 AM »
Yes, there's nothing to be the oral tradition.

tsaria

Offline AGRBear

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Re: The Peasant/worker in Russia
« Reply #200 on: July 29, 2010, 02:48:29 PM »
Bringing this forward since we're discussing the peasant under  the subject of people whom  Nicholas II believed betrayed him.

AGRBear
"What is true by lamplight is not always true by sunlight."

Joubert, Pensees, No. 152

Offline Превед

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Re: The Peasant/worker in Russia
« Reply #201 on: May 10, 2014, 07:21:48 PM »
Anyone who agrees that serfdom was re-introduced by the Soviets and thus not finally abolished untill 1989 - 200 years after the French Revolution!
(Due to collective farming and the fact that it wasn't easy for kolkhozniki to leave and seek employment in the city.)
« Last Edit: May 10, 2014, 07:27:54 PM by Превед »
Берёзы севера мне милы,
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: Ивы и берёзы, 1843 / 1856)

Offline TimM

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Re: The Peasant/worker in Russia
« Reply #202 on: May 11, 2014, 04:27:49 PM »
Quote
Anyone who agrees that serfdom was re-introduced by the Soviets and thus not finally abolished untill 1989 - 200 years after the French Revolution!
(Due to collective farming and the fact that it wasn't easy for kolkhozniki to leave and seek employment in the city.)

The names may have changed, but the concept was essentially the same.
Cats: You just gotta love them!

Offline Превед

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Re: The Peasant/worker in Russia
« Reply #203 on: June 07, 2015, 07:27:30 AM »
Wikipedia has a rather lucid article about Russian serfdom: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serfdom_in_Russia
I was surprised that actual slavery (as opposed to serfdom) wasn't formally abolished in Russia untill 1723, but still lingered on.
« Last Edit: June 07, 2015, 07:29:04 AM by Превед »
Берёзы севера мне милы,
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: Ивы и берёзы, 1843 / 1856)