Author Topic: The Bowes-Lyons  (Read 83586 times)

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Offline capttrips

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Re: The Bowes-Lyons
« Reply #15 on: November 23, 2010, 05:48:31 PM »
After the 1715 revolution, Are any Lyons known to have come to America?

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: The Bowes-Lyons
« Reply #16 on: November 24, 2010, 09:17:49 AM »
My surname is Lyon and we like to think we are related to the aristocratic Lyons!

The original royal link is indeed through Robert II. His chamberlain (finance minister in Scotland), Sir John Lyon, married the king's eldest daughter, Jean Stewart, in 1372 as her second husband. They produced one son, another John, from whom the Lyons of Glamis are descended. Sir John Lyon's origins are unclear. He seems to have been the first of the name. However, www.baronage.co.uk has made the interesting suggestion on the basis of his coat of arms (argent, a lion rampart azure, overall a riband gules) that in an age when surnames were fluid he was a Bruce who changed his name. The arms of the English branch of the Bruces were argent, a lion rampant azure, and, it is argued, no one in those days would adopt a coat of arms to which he was not entitled by blood, particularly when a Bruce occupied the throne (David II 1329-71). A later Lyon duly became Lord Glamis, and in due course his descendants became successively Earls of Kinghorn and then Strathmore.

Where my rather modest Liverpudlian ancestors fit in I don't know!

Ann

Offline capttrips

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Re: The Bowes-Lyons
« Reply #17 on: November 24, 2010, 02:14:39 PM »
Ann, that is fascinating.

Offline Kalafrana

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Re: The Bowes-Lyons
« Reply #18 on: November 25, 2010, 03:19:17 AM »
My family have certainly been persons of modest means in Liverpool since the end of the 18th century. Whether we have any connection with the aristocratic Lyons I don't know, but someone researching Y-chromosome DNA used people called Sykes as his experimental group, and concluded that they were all descended from a common males ancestor living in the 13th century. Sykes is about as common a surname as Lyon, so who know?

Ann Elizabeth Lyon

Offline capttrips

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Re: The Bowes-Lyons
« Reply #19 on: November 25, 2010, 01:26:22 PM »
I am not so interested in DNA tests.

I was just thinking, if the Lyons went broke and became Bowes-Lyons in 1715, Maybe a younger son or cousin might have been ordered to America for the free land?  Or, fled for his life?  If so, there should be historical records.

In any even, an entire century seperates my family's Lyons from this magic date of 1715, and it is highly unlikely we will ever be able to recross the Atlantic in our researches.

I hope your research works out for you (I hear almost all Lyons are related and form a Clan.)

Offline Превед

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Re: The Bowes-Lyons
« Reply #20 on: July 31, 2014, 02:07:48 PM »
"Cпрятала" двоюродная сестра королевы Елизаветы II умерла в феврале этого года.
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"Hidden" cousin of Queen Elizabeth II died in February this year.
http://ru-royalty.livejournal.com/2379347.html

Quote
.... сестры Боуз-Лайон знали о своем происхождении. Их любимым развлечением был просмотр телевизора, особенно их интересовали новости с участием членов королевской семьи. Когда они видели на экране свою двоюродную сестру королеву, они делали книксен перед телевизором.
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.... the Bowes-Lyon sisters knew their origin. Their favorite pastime was watching TV, and they were especially interested in news about members of the royal family. When they saw on the screen their cousin the Queen, they did a curtsey in front of TV.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2014, 02:16:40 PM by Превед »
Берёзы севера мне милы,
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: Ивы и берёзы, 1843 / 1856)