Author Topic: Counts Sheremetev  (Read 56622 times)

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Offline hikaru

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2007, 01:34:16 PM »
This is a very unique estate, because all of this estate is ....real.
Real walls, real floors (oldest parquette in russia), real lamps , real furniture etc.
It is very cozy estate, but very spoiled as well.
It is impossible to visit in in the winter or rainy days in the summer.
The park is very good too.
Italian house, Grot, Holland house , Swiss's house are very pretty indead.
There is also an porcelaine museum on the territory of the estate where you could see even
rare Yusssupov's factory porcelaine.
This estate is often used for the movies' scene.
It was made as the small copy of Versaiile or Peterhof.

Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2007, 07:00:46 PM »
I must apologize, I wanted to send those shots 2 months ago however university left me too bus to do it before...

Ostankino









Vassili

Offline Joanna

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #17 on: January 19, 2008, 08:40:48 PM »
Count A.D. Sheremetiev's estate 'Ulyanka' at Ligovo (near Peterhof):
http://photoarchive.spb.ru:9090/www/showObject.do?object=2007775971

I do not know what estates in the Ligovo area have survived and would be interested if anyone knows of this building or others.

Joanna

Offline dp5486

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #18 on: January 20, 2008, 10:24:46 AM »
During my research I've noticed that there was an Elisaveta Dmitrievna Sheremeteva who married Prince Boris Leonidovich Wiazemsky and an Irina Dmitrievna Sheremeteva who married Count George Dmitrievich Mengden. Does anyone know if they were related and if so, were they also the daughters of Dmitri and Irina (Vorontzova-Dashkova) Sheremetev?

Offline ashdean

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #19 on: January 23, 2008, 09:15:38 AM »
During my research I've noticed that there was an Elisaveta Dmitrievna Sheremeteva who married Prince Boris Leonidovich Wiazemsky and an Irina Dmitrievna Sheremeteva who married Count George Dmitrievich Mengden. Does anyone know if they were related and if so, were they also the daughters of Dmitri and Irina (Vorontzova-Dashkova) Sheremetev?
Princess Boris Wiazemsky was the daughter of Dimitri & Irina S....three Wiazemsky brothers married 3 first cousins all grandchildren of Count Ilarion Vorontsov _ Dashkov (died 1916) and his formidable wife Countess "Lily" ness Countess Shouvalova (1845-1924).

Offline dp5486

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #20 on: January 23, 2008, 06:17:14 PM »
Thank you ashdean. I've been moderately successful in tracking down the wives of the Princes Wiazemsky. At least most of their families managed to escape! It's very difficult to track the genealogies of these families out on the web!

Offline ashdean

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #21 on: January 24, 2008, 02:53:32 PM »
Thank you ashdean. I've been moderately successful in tracking down the wives of the Princes Wiazemsky. At least most of their families managed to escape! It's very difficult to track the genealogies of these families out on the web!
The 2 widowed Princesses both remarried in exile. One married Count  Fersen (a grandson of Princess Olga Doulgorouky) whose brother married Baroness Marie de Stael in Genoa immediately after they arrived there from Malta after leaving the Marlborough.

Offline dp5486

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #22 on: January 24, 2008, 09:09:53 PM »
This must be Princess Alexandra Pavlovna Shuvalova Wiazemsky who married Count Alexander Nikolaievich Fersen. I was curious ashdean, do you know the names of Alexander's sisters? I have Paul Nikolaievich, Alexander Nikolaievich, and Elisabeth Nikolaievna Fersen; the children of Nicholas and Sophia Dolgoruky Fersen. I remember reading that they had several other daughters. 

Offline ashdean

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #23 on: January 25, 2008, 11:12:49 AM »
This must be Princess Alexandra Pavlovna Shuvalova Wiazemsky who married Count Alexander Nikolaievich Fersen. I was curious ashdean, do you know the names of Alexander's sisters? I have Paul Nikolaievich, Alexander Nikolaievich, and Elisabeth Nikolaievna Fersen; the children of Nicholas and Sophia Dolgoruky Fersen. I remember reading that they had several other daughters. 
They had one other (the youngest and 4th child) daughter Olga she left Russia on the Lord Nelson with her mother..the 4 fersen children were each named for a grandparent.Count Nicholas died in Rome in 1920 his widow survived him by many years..dying (I think) in 1957 in Rome....there details are in the Doulgoruky listings in Ferrands 2 volume Princes of the Russian Empire..along with Sophia's 4 sisters and 2 brothers and their off spring.

Offline dp5486

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2008, 09:42:06 PM »
Thank you for that. Is there any details on the Kleinmichel family in that book? They're a family I've been trying to track down for some time now.

Offline ashdean

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #25 on: January 28, 2008, 12:19:46 PM »
Thank you for that. Is there any details on the Kleinmichel family in that book? They're a family I've been trying to track down for some time now.
Thereis a 2 volume publication on the Counts of the Russian Empire...

Offline Nadya_Arapov

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #26 on: April 29, 2008, 11:06:26 AM »
Paul and Maria’s elder daughter Princess Ekaterina “Katenka” Vyzemskaya (1849-Jan 1929) was charming, composed, intelligent and patient; the perfect foil for her more volatile husband. She served as one of Maria Feodorovna’s ladies-in-waiting. She was a member of the Society of Devotees of Ancient Manuscript Literature (of which her father and later her husband were president) and founder of the Natural History Museum just outside of Moscow. She helped her husband to restore and preserve Ostafievo and the estate’s treasures. She married Count Sergei Dmitrievich Sheremetev in 1868. Sergei’s father Dmitri S. Sheremetev (1803-1871), was the only child of Count Nikolai Sheremetev, one of the wealthiest men in Russia and an avid collector (like just about everyone else in this family), and his wife the former Serf actress Praskovia Ivanovna Zhemchugova. Sergei was a prominent intellectual, Slavophil, a member of the State Council, an honorary member of the Academy of the Sciences, and an historian who had authored histories of Russia and the Holy Land. While Sergei had inherited a significant artistic and architectural legacy of his own (including the estates at Ostankino and Kuskovo) he shared his wife’s passion for Ostafievo. They felt that the estate with its many treasures and its literary association held significance not only for their family, but for the nation as a whole, and should be preserved for future generations. In 1899, on what would have been Pushkin’s 100th birthday, they proclaimed Ostafievo a public museum and from 1902 the public was allowed to tour the palace and the surrounding park during a certain part of the year.

Ekaterina (Vyazemskaya) Sheremeteva


Sergei, Ekaterina holding up Dmitri, and Alexandra (Vyazemskaya) Sipyagina. 1870


Sergei Sheremetev with one of his grandsons.


Sergei and Ekaterina (Vyazemskaya) Sheremeteva had nine children: Dmitri (1869-1943), Paul (1871-1943), Boris (1872 – 1952?), Anna (1873-1949), Peter (1876-May 1914), Sergei (1878-1942), Maria (1880-1945), Ekaterina (1880-1880), and Vasily (1882-1883).

Left to right: Dmitri, Paul, Boris and Anna. Ca. 1875


Dmitri and Paul are standing. Anna is in the chair. Boris is on the floor.


The Sheremetev Children ca 1876. Standing (left to right) a cousin, Dmitri, and another cousin. Sitting in front of Dmitri is Anna. The boy on the floor next to Anna is Paul.  The boy sitting on the other chair is Boris. The two cousins on standing either side of Dmitri were Alexei Sheremetev (on his left) and Boris Sheremetev (on his right); they were the children of Sergei Alexeyevich Sheremetev (1836-1896) and his wife Princess Evdokia Golitsyna.


(Left to right) Dmitri Sheremetev, Vladimir Musin-Puskin, Paul Sheremetev, Boris Sheremetev, Anna Sheremeteva, and Peter Sheremetev ca 1881. Count Vladimir Musin-Puskin (1870-1923) was elected to the Duma in 1912. He immigrated in 1917.


Left to right: Dmitri, Paul, Peter, Anna, Boris, Sergei, Maria ca 1883


Offline Nadya_Arapov

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #27 on: April 29, 2008, 11:11:09 AM »
Sergei and Ekaterina’s oldest child Count Dmitri Sheremetev (1869-1943) was an officer of the Chevalier Guards eventually becoming colonel of that regiment. He had known Tsar since childhood and served as one of Nicholas II’s aide-de-camps. During WWI he spent a considerable amount of time at the front with Nicholas II’s entourage. In 1892 he married society denizen Lili Vorontsova-Dashkova’s daughter Countess Irina Illarionovna Vorontsova-Dashkova. After the Revolution his family fled to the Caucasus to escape the Bolsheviks, but when the Soviets arrived at Kislovodsk his family fled into the mountains and from there to the Crimea. They left Russia aboard the British destroyer HMS Speedy in April 1919. He left Turkey and settled in Rome where he spent the remainder of his life. He was very active in the émigré community. He was the first President of the Refugees Committee and chairman of the Union of Russian Nobles (1926-1929). His daughter Praskovia (b.1901) married Prince Roman Petrovich of Russia.

Dmitri as an adult:


Left to right Paul Sheremetev, Dmitri Sheremetev, and Count Vladimir Musin-Pushkin


Dmitri’s wife Irina:


Count Boris Sheremetev was also a Guards Officer and colonel. (1872-aft 1918). I’m not sure what became of his after the Revolution. I know that he was alive and well and living with his parents and his daughters in Moscow in 1918. He was arrested in late 1918 by the Bolsheviks, but was released. He was supposedly murdered by the Bolsheviks at a later date. I have read claims that this took place at Ostafievo, but have never seen a reliable source given for this information. Other sources state that he escaped, married Baroness Marie Louise Marguerite Marthe von Goebel in 1929 and died abroad in either 1946 or 1952.

Here are three photographs of Boris as a child:






Count Peter Sheremetev (1876-1914) was also an army officer and aide-de-camp. He was married to the daughter of Baron Feofil “Uncle Feofil” von Meyendorff, Baroness Elena Feofilovna von Meyendorff (1881-1966) and had seven children. Elena was still in Russia in 1918 and probably spent the rest of her life there. Their daughter Elena Petrovna (b.1904) married Prince Vladimir Golitsyn (b.1902) at Moscow in 1923. She died in Moscow in 1992. Prince Vladimir Golitsyn died at the gulag in Sviajsk, Kazan, Russia in 1943.

The two Sheremetev daughters Anna (1873-1949) and Maria (1880-1945) were destined to face much sorrow in their lives. The eldest, Anna, was described as charming and intelligent like her mother Ekaterina, but unlike Ekaterina, she was also vivacious and mischievous with a “dazzling smile,” possessing an interest in mysticism. She was an outgoing woman who outshone her husband and her younger and more gentle, obedient sister Maria Sheremeteva. Anna served as a maid-of-honor in her youth. Against the wishes of her parents she married Alexander Petrovich “Alik” Saburov (1870-1919) a Guards officer who later served as civil governor of St. Petersburg (1916-1917), he was the son of a prominent diplomat and chess champion. Sergei Sheremetev apparently didn’t consider a mere Saburov worthy of his daughter, but Anna’s will won out and the Saburovs were a happy couple. They had three children: Boris, Yuri, and Xenia
The younger daughter, Maria Sheremeteva, married Count Alexander Vasilyevich “Sasha” Gudovich (1869-1919). Before the Revolution he served as Governor of Kutaisi. They had four children: Barbara, Dmitri, Maria and Andrei Gudovich.

Anna (Sheremeteva) Saburova as a child.


Maria (Sheremeteva) Gudovich


Left to right: Maria (Sheremeteva) Gudovich, Sergei Sheremetev, Ekaterina (Vyazemskaya) Sheremeteva, and Dmitri Sergeyevich Sheremetev ca 1900


Offline Nadya_Arapov

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #28 on: April 29, 2008, 11:17:28 AM »
After the Revolution the Sheremetevs were allowed remain in a few rooms in their Moscow home in Vozdvizhenka Street. In this house Sergei and his wife lived with their sons Paul and Boris, Boris’ daughters, their daughters Anna and Maria and their families, their son Peter’s widow, Elena, and her children.

Sheremetev house on Vozdvizhenka Street in Moscow:






Sergei and Ekaterina’s granddaughter Elena Petrovna Sheremeteva described their life after the Revolution in Sergei’s home in Moscow:
http://moskva.kotoroy.net/histories/31.html

“At first our family lived in the corner drawing room …We slept, some on a sofa, some standing. My brothers were placed somewhere else. Grandfather lived upstairs he could not go downstairs due to his illness… After school we came home to dinner. Alexei Alexandrovich, (their chef) prepared tasty food but (there was) very little. We all sat at the big table. Dmitry Feodorovich passed around a dish to the left. Grandmother Sheremeteva sat with her sons; Uncle Paul, Uncle Boris, Uncle Sergey, Uncle Alik (Saburov), Uncle Sasha (Gudovich), Mama, Aunt Maria my father’s sisters and all of us children… We all sat properly and talked.”

Elena goes on to describe how on one such evening in late 1918 their dinner was interrupted by a visit from the Cheka:

“Suddenly from the grand staircase the door opened, and a man in a black leather jacket burst in, with a raised revolver: “Hands up”!... We all remained sitting and raised our hands, and Dmitry Feodorovich put the dish on the floor and too raised his hands also. Toward grandfather they have risen, but he was already very sick. The search lasted all night…Many precious things they took from Aunt Maria Gudovich and put them in their pockets …They took all the men…because of grandfather’s illness they released his sons on bail….”

Alexander “Sasha” Gudovich and Alexander “Alik” Saburov were less fortunate. They remained in prison and were shot by the Cheka in 1919.

Sergei Sheremetev, the family matriarch, was spared this horror dying after a long illness at his home in Moscow not long after the raid, in November 1918.

Anna (Sheremeteva) Saburova was arrested in 1921, but released. In 1924, along with many other nobles, Maria, her sons Dmitri and Andrei, and Anna and her three children, were banished from Moscow and exiled to Kaluga. There they occupied a small squalid house. Maria’s daughter Barbara had married and was living elsewhere. I do not know what the Gudovich children were like, but Anna’s eldest son Boris Saburov was described by someone who met him at the Sheremetev home in Moscow during the early 1920s as extremely talented, unusual, beautiful, with a keen interest in the future despite their present conditions. This same person, after encountering Anna in Kaluga in the mid-20s, remarked that while hardship had marred Anna’s beauty, her personality remained the same. Anna’s daughter Xenia Saburova was the most practical member of the family. As they had very little to live on Xenia tried to economize. She would make occasional excursions to Moscow to try and sell a few of their remaining possessions for extra money. Sometime between 1924 and 1927 they were allowed to settle at Tsaritsyno, but the NKVD (the Cheka’s successors) would not leave them in peace. In 1927, Dmitri and Andrei Gudovich were arrested along with their cousins Boris and Yuri Saburov. They were each sentenced to five years in a gulag.

It seems that the Saburovs - Boris and Yuri - were sent to a gulag near the Siberian town of Irbit in Sverdlovsk Oblast. I am not certain if the Gudovichs were sent to the same gulag or another. I found a transcription online in Russian of a letter Maria (Sheremeteva) Gudovich wrote to David Ryazanov dated 27 April 1930 asking him to intercede on behalf of her sons Dmitri and Andrei. My Russian isn’t terribly good, but I was able to make out the gist of the letter. She wrote that her sons had been incarcerated for three years and that she was frightened that they would die, as epidemic typhus was raging through the concentration camp where they were being held. She asked that they be transferred to a town where they could be allowed to serve their sentence working as laborers. She also mentions that official charges had never been brought against them. Perhaps this plea did not fall on deaf ears because all four young men were apparently released later that year (1930).

Dmitri and Andrei Gudovich, after being released, were put to work in construction taking part in the building of the Moscow-Volga Canal. What became of them after 1930 I do not know.

Their cousins the Saburovs were released and sent off to Vladimir where their mother Anna joined them. However, in 1937, Boris and Yuri Saburov were once again arrested, and this time they disappeared without a trace. They were almost certainly executed by the NKVD.

Anna and Maria’s daughters were no more fortunate than their brothers. Xenia Saburova was arrested and exiled to a gulag in Kazakhstan ca 1930. What became of her after this I do not know. Maria’s daughter Countess Barbara Gudovich (1900-1938) was a painter. She married her Uncle Paul’s brother-in-law Prince Vladimir Vasilyevich Obolensky (1890-1937) at Ostafievo in August 1921. Both Barbara and Vladimir perished in Siberian gulags. Barbara had three children with Vladimir Obolensky: Elizabeth (1922-2003 Moscow), Andrei (1923/4- MIA during WWII 1943), and Nikolai (b.1927) all were born at Tsaritsyno and later resided in Moscow. Barbara’s son Nikolai became a professor and is apparently still alive and well.

A photo of the wedding of Barbara Gudovich in 1921 to Paul’s brother-in-law Prince Vladimir Obolensky. Seated on the left five people from the front is Praskovia (Obolenskaya) Sheremeteva, to her right is her mother-in-law Ekaterina (Vyazemskaya) Sheremeteva, to Ekaterina's right (I believe) is the groom Vladimir Obolensky, to his right is the bride Barbara, seated to her right is Paul Sheremetev, and to the right of Paul is Barbara’s mother Maria (Sheremeteva) Gudovich.


« Last Edit: April 29, 2008, 11:27:04 AM by Nadya_Arapov »

Offline Nadya_Arapov

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Re: Counts Sheremetev
« Reply #29 on: April 29, 2008, 11:22:10 AM »
Paul Sheremetev (1871-1943) was the standard-bearer of the family. Like his father Paul was an historian, a corresponding member of the Russian History Society, an author, an artist, and a former officer who had served in the Russo-Japanese War (1904-1905). He had studied history and philology at University in St. Petersburg. He married Princess Praskovia Vasilyevna Obolenskaya (1883-1942). They had a son Count Vasily Sheremetev (1922-1989) who fought in the Red Army during WWII. Paul was described as pensive and taciturn while Praskovia was kind and hospitable.

Paul shared his parents’ passion for Ostafievo which was filled with happy memories for him of time spent there with his parents and siblings. In 1918, before the Soviets could appropriate Ostafievo, his father Sergei, probably hoping to spare the estate from ransack and ruin, decided to bequeath Ostafievo and the collections to the new government. The palace did survive the Civil War and in 1921 it was once more opened to the public as a museum. Paul was chosen to act as director and curator. It was a position he held for the next seven years. He was allotted a few rooms to occupy in the palace where he lived with his wife, son, and mother Ekaterina.

“A.V.Lunacharsky, his (Lenin's) cultural commissar, moved into the main house at Ostafievo, allowing Pavel Sheremetev, Sergei's son, to live in a wing and act as director of the Ostafievo Museum. Some still remember his courteous tours of the house he had once owned. In 1922, eighty-seven...individuals, including A.N. Grech, Pavel Sheremetev, and the sons of Polenov and the poet N. A. Nekrasov, founded the Society for the Study of the Russian Estate. Its members did historical research, wrote articles for the new periodical Among Collectors, and published guidebooks to suburban Moscow's estates. After Lunacharsky's death and Stalin's consolidation of power in 1928 the second phase of destruction began...Pavel Sheremetev was fortunate in merely being evicted from Ostafievo. Many of his collaborators were sent to the gulag, where they vanished without a trace."
(Ref: Priscilla Roosevelt’s “Life on the Russian Country Estate” pp 330)

Despite Lunacharsky’s support in 1924 the government decided that the museum’s focus should not be artistic, but instead be devoted to the history of Russian literature. To Paul’s horror the collection that he and his father had meticulously catalogued and salvaged from the Revolution was taken from the palace and transferred to other museums throughout Russia. The most important works of art were transferred to the Museum of Fine Art in Moscow. Ironically, despite the museum’s supposed literary focus, all of the Pushkin-related items were also taken and transferred to the Pushkin house in St. Petersburg. This marked the beginning of the end for Ostafievo. In June 1928 Paul was stripped of his civil liberties on account of his social origins and was removed from his position as director and curator.  In the autumn of 1929 Paul was evicted from Ostafievo and given just four day to pack his belongings and leave. He then lived for a time in the tower of the Novodevichy Convent. His family moved to Tsaritsyno ca 1937. His wife Praskovia died there in a Soviet prison in 1941 or 1942. Paul became ill after her death and died at Tsaritsyno in 1943.

In March of 1930, despite pleas that it be kept open, the Soviets closed Ostafievo to the public. What was left of its collections was scattered, being given to libraries and museums throughout Russia. Ostafievo, minus her once vast art collection, is again a museum open to the public.

Paul Sheremetev as a child.


Paul as an adult.


Paul in during the Soviet era:


Paul, Praskovia, and their son Vasily probably in the


A photograph of Ekaterina (Vyazemskaya) Sheremeteva (on the left) and her sister Alexandra (Vyazemskaya) Sipyagina (on the right) taken at Ostafievo ca. 1924.


Paul’s son Vasily Sheremetev during WWII: