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Topic: King Louis XV and his family  (Read 32986 times)
« on: November 06, 2005, 10:37:30 PM »
Christopher Offline
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The daughters of Louis XV deserve their own thread, they were all interesting characters especially Madame Adelaide.
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« on: November 07, 2005, 11:39:08 AM »
elena_maria_vidal Offline
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The daughters of LouisXV and Queen Marie Lescynska are a great topic for discussion, thanks for starting it! It always amazes me how much genuine familial feelings all the children of LouisXV had for each other and for their parents, what with growing up in the rareified atmosphere of Versailles, but they did, probably because of their mother. (Although Louis XV himself appeared to be a very devoted father, in spite of his many recreational pursuits.)

Madame Louise of France, the youngest daughter, indeed became a nun under the name of Mother Therese de Saint-Augustin of the Discalced Carmelite order. She chose to enter one of the poorest and most penitential Carmelite monasteries in France, that of Saint-Denis, rather than the more fashionable one in Paris. She ran from away from home to join the monastery in order to avoid a big fuss at Court. She later claimed her health improved as a nun for she was very happy there. Marie-Antoinette came to the monastery to give her the veil when Mme. Louise donned the Carmelite habit. When she made her final vows, all the churches were alerted and peeled their bells, spreading to churches in other villages, so that all the bells in France were ringing to celebrate the oblation of the King's daughter.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by elena_maria_vidal » Logged
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« on: November 07, 2005, 11:58:48 AM »
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Victoire and Sophie both had odd psychological quirks, perhaps due to having been sent to a convent at a young age. This was an economy measure imposed by Louis XV on the recommendation of Fleury. Adelaide escaped this by pleading with her father to be allowed to remain at court. The younger girls spent ten years at Fontevraud, however. I'm not sure that they were even allowed back for holidays!

Victoire suffered from panic attacks. Sophie was so shy that she might be called agoraphobic. She was frightened of thunderstorms!
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Reply #3
« on: November 07, 2005, 12:29:39 PM »
elena_maria_vidal Offline
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 Oh, Bell. Madame Louise was raised at the same Benedictine monastery as her sisters  but without the odd quirks. Many people acquire phobias without having ever set foot in a monastery. Being a member of the Bourbon family was enough.
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« on: November 08, 2005, 11:43:42 AM »
elena_maria_vidal Offline
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Their mother, Queen Marie Lezynscka, was a Polish princess and said to be very pretty when she was young. Louis XV was, by all accounts, quite taken with her in the first years of their marriage. (He was 16 and she was 22 when they were married.) Louis XV himself was very handsome, so it only stands to reason that they would have some attractive children.
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« on: November 09, 2005, 05:20:24 AM »
ilyala Offline
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he probably would have even without the saints thing. that just hurried things up a little Grin
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Reply #6
« on: November 09, 2005, 08:31:33 AM »
elena_maria_vidal Offline
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Yes, he had a wandering eye. Poor Queen Marie, maybe she had a health problem or something, and the holy day thing was just an excuse. (If she did indeed "refuse him" for religious reasons, especially when it against Catholic teaching for a wife to refuse her husband, or vice versa....It almost sounds like something impious people at the Court of Versailles would make up about a devout woman in order to excuse her husband's philandering. Just a speculation on my part....)
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by elena_maria_vidal » Logged
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« on: November 09, 2005, 08:55:25 AM »
ilyala Offline
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yes, after all, she had so many children.... i'm pretty sure she was tired and used any excuse she could... apparently king louis respected her religious nature (in the beginning he admired it... until it became too much) and she took advantage of that
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« on: November 09, 2005, 08:56:31 AM »
elena_maria_vidal Offline
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 Yes, Queen Marie really did love her husband and was heartbroken by his many infidelities. She had skulls with beribboned wigs in her room, called "belles-mignonnes" in order to remind herself of the fleetingness of life.
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« on: November 09, 2005, 09:13:25 AM »
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Quote
Yes, Queen Marie really did love her husband and was heartbroken by his many infidelities. She had skulls with beribboned wigs in her room, called "belles-mignonnes" in order to remind herself of the fleetingness of life.


This is rather odd behaviour is it not? It sounds a bit like voodoo!
Were the dolls supposed to represent particular departed friends, or perhaps the king's mistresses?
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« on: November 09, 2005, 09:47:18 AM »
elena_maria_vidal Offline
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This is rather odd behaviour is it not? It sounds a bit like voodoo!
Were the dolls supposed to represent particular departed friends, or perhaps the king's mistresses?


No, Bell, none of the above, although I agree it sounds odd. It is an ethnic RC thing - like the famous Capuchin church in Rome with all the skeletal decorations. It was just intended as a reminder of death; that the pleasures and troubles of life will all pass away.
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« on: November 09, 2005, 09:49:30 AM »
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No, Bell, none of the above, although I agree it sounds odd. It is an ethnic RC thing - like the famous Capuchin church in Rome with all the skeletal decorations. It was just intended as a reminder of death; that the pleasures and troubles of life will all pass away.


Did other royals have this in their rooms as well, or was it only Marie Leczynska?
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« on: November 10, 2005, 08:33:57 AM »
elena_maria_vidal Offline
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There is an anecdote about the formidable Mme. Adelaide which shows her tender side, especially towards her neices and nephews. The future Louis XVI, while still Dauphin, was a shy and quiet teenager, and his Tante Adelaide worried about him. She once told him to go to her rooms and run, shout, smash whatever he wanted to, just so that he could express some pent-up emotion. I don't think Louis accepted her offer; instead he worked at his forge in the attic.
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« on: November 10, 2005, 12:48:13 PM »
Eddie_uk Offline
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I find the sisters very entertaining! Weren't they all given unflattering nick names by their father such as "Rag"!!?? Their is a couple of other portraits painted of them in Rome just after they had fled. By the sounds of things, coming from the splendours of Versailles, they didn't enjoy an easy exile.





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« on: November 10, 2005, 01:54:24 PM »
bell_the_cat Offline
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They were called Graille, Coche, Chiffe and Loque.

Snip, Pig, Rag and Dud.

Louis XV once embarassed Mme Campan by asking where Coche ("Piggy") was. Afterwards it was explained to her that this was his name for Mme Victoire.

I'm pretty sure that Louise was "Loque". I think Adelaide was "Graille" and Sophie was "Chiffe".

Adelaide and Victoire were quite comfortable in Rome (comfortable enough to have Vigée Lebrun come and paint their portraits). Eventually they were forced to leave by the revolutionary armies. They had to move around quite a bit, and by the time of their deaths (1799 and 1800), they were in quite reduced circumstances.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 05:00:00 PM by bell_the_cat » Logged

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