Author Topic: Nicholas II's Torah Scroll  (Read 2268 times)

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Offline RichC

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Nicholas II's Torah Scroll
« on: November 21, 2005, 12:53:54 PM »
Here is an interesting article about a Torah Scroll that was presented to Nicholas II in 1914 by the Jewish community of Odessa.

Here is the link:

http://www.fjc.ru/news/newsArticle.asp?AID=132610

Here is the article:

S. PETERSBURG, Russia - A rare Torah scroll presented as a gift to Tsar Nikolai II by the Odessa Jewish community in 1914 will soon be displayed, thanks to the efforts of 'Beit Chabad' in S. Petersburg. The Torah, which has been in the storeroom of the State Museum 'Tsarskoe Selo' for decades, will finally see light in an exhibition the museum is organizing in Finland.

Rabbi Zvi Pinsky, the Director of 'Beit Chabad' in S. Petersburg, met with the Directors of the 'Tsarskoe Selo' Museum in order to advise them as to the proper way of storing, displaying and transporting the Torah, in accordance with Jewish tradition. During the meeting, Rabbi Pinsky also took the opportunity to request the transfer of the Torah to the S. Petersburg Jewish community.

At the meeting, the museum's Vice-Director told him, "the history of this scroll is very interesting, and we need your assistance to resolve some of the questions we have in this regard". The history of the scroll dates back to 1914, when Tsar Nikolai II met a group of Odessa Jews on his return trip from Romania back to S. Petersburg. The Jewish community presented the Tsar with this scroll, enclosed in its own Aron HaKodesh and designed by top masters.

The gift was sent to the S. Petersburg museum later. The Torah scroll and Aron HaKodesh miraculously survived World War Two, when museum workers secretly sent all exhibition pieces to the Urals for safe-keeping as Nazi troops were approaching S. Petersburg.

The museum's current vice-director believes that the scroll survived only thanks to the man who served as the museum's director at that time, who was Jewish and thus knew the real value of this Torah Scroll.

Rabbi Pinsky has confirmed the great value of this scroll, which has finally been freed from the museum's storerooms. While visitors of the touring exhibition in Finland will have the opportunity to see the scroll sometime in the near future, members of the S. Petersburg Jewish community are hopeful that they will see this Torah in a local synagogue soon.


ferngully

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Re: Nicholas II's Torah Scroll
« Reply #1 on: December 17, 2005, 07:25:26 AM »
wow! thats really interesting. how did the tsar react to that i wonder?
selina                     xxxxxxxx

Offline Lucien

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Nicholas II's Torah Scroll
« Reply #2 on: August 12, 2009, 10:32:06 AM »
Here is an interesting article about a Torah Scroll that was presented to Nicholas II in 1914 by the Jewish community of Odessa.

Here is the link:

http://www.fjc.ru/news/newsArticle.asp?AID=132610

Here is the article:

S. PETERSBURG, Russia - A rare Torah scroll presented as a gift to Tsar Nikolai II by the Odessa Jewish community in 1914 will soon be displayed, thanks to the efforts of 'Beit Chabad' in S. Petersburg. The Torah, which has been in the storeroom of the State Museum 'Tsarskoe Selo' for decades, will finally see light in an exhibition the museum is organizing in Finland.

Rabbi Zvi Pinsky, the Director of 'Beit Chabad' in S. Petersburg, met with the Directors of the 'Tsarskoe Selo' Museum in order to advise them as to the proper way of storing, displaying and transporting the Torah, in accordance with Jewish tradition. During the meeting, Rabbi Pinsky also took the opportunity to request the transfer of the Torah to the S. Petersburg Jewish community.

At the meeting, the museum's Vice-Director told him, "the history of this scroll is very interesting, and we need your assistance to resolve some of the questions we have in this regard". The history of the scroll dates back to 1914, when Tsar Nikolai II met a group of Odessa Jews on his return trip from Romania back to S. Petersburg. The Jewish community presented the Tsar with this scroll, enclosed in its own Aron HaKodesh and designed by top masters.

The gift was sent to the S. Petersburg museum later. The Torah scroll and Aron HaKodesh miraculously survived World War Two, when museum workers secretly sent all exhibition pieces to the Urals for safe-keeping as Nazi troops were approaching S. Petersburg.

The museum's current vice-director believes that the scroll survived only thanks to the man who served as the museum's director at that time, who was Jewish and thus knew the real value of this Torah Scroll.

Rabbi Pinsky has confirmed the great value of this scroll, which has finally been freed from the museum's storerooms. While visitors of the touring exhibition in Finland will have the opportunity to see the scroll sometime in the near future, members of the S. Petersburg Jewish community are hopeful that they will see this Torah in a local synagogue soon.



This particular scroll is in the present exhibition at the Hermitage here.Beautifull.
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