Author Topic: Frederick V, his wives and children  (Read 15152 times)

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Offline synnadene

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Frederick V, his wives and children
« on: November 22, 2005, 03:15:06 AM »
Please post portraits/infos about the following danish Princesses:

SOPHIE MAGDALENE (1746-1813) Queen of Sweden
CAROLINE (1747-1820) Electress of Hesse
LOUISE (1750-1831) Landgravin of Hesse-Kassel
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by synnadene »

Offline redlow53

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #1 on: November 22, 2005, 06:28:52 AM »
Sofie Magdalene (3th July 1746-21th August 1813)married 1th October 1766 later King Gustav III of Sweden.

Wilhelmine Caroline (10th July 1747-14th January 1820) married 1th September 1766 Wilhelm I of Hessen-Kassel.

Louise (30th January 1750-12th January 1831) married Karl of Hessen-Kassel (brother of Wilhelm I).
A daughter, Maria Sofia Frederikke married King Frederik VI of Denmark.
The youngest daughter married Wilhelm of Glücksburg and became mother of King Christian IX of Denmark.

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Offline kmerov

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #2 on: November 26, 2005, 05:59:29 PM »
The best I can do for now is this B/W picture of Princess Louise in her old years.

Offline Marc

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #3 on: November 28, 2005, 08:20:30 PM »
If you find it somewhere in colour,please post it!I am sure that colour portraits are more flattering...  :)

Offline kmerov

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2006, 12:29:13 PM »
A miniature-portrait of Princess Louise in 1772.


Offline Marc

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #5 on: January 30, 2006, 03:11:53 PM »
Great portraits Kmerov(on this and on other threads)!I just love your posts-they are allways new and interesting-thanks!

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2006, 06:15:04 AM »
Hi everyone. I'm interested in knowing more about this Hanoverian queen of Denmark. Daniela posted this great mini bio on the 'Queens of Denmark' thread:

Louisa of Great Britain, first wife of Frederik V (1724-1751)

She was born on December 18, 1724; her parents were King George II of Great Britain and Queen Caroline, nee of Brandenburg-Ansbach at Leicester House in London.
She married Frederik on December 11, 1743.
The Queen made a great effort to learn the Danish language and insisted on teaching it to her children. This contributed to her popularity.  
Louise gave birth to five children, of which four survived. Their first son died in infancy, first daughter Sophie Magdalena became Queen of Sweden, after marrying King Gustav III; their younger daughters Caroline and Louise married brothers Wilhelm IX of Hesse Cassel and Karl of Hesse Cassel respectively; Louise of Hesse Cassel was a Grandmother of King Christian IX of Denmark.
Louise's arrival in Denmark meant a change at the Danish Court. Life became much more joyful than it had been during the reign of the strongly Pietist Christian VI and Queen Sophie Magdalene. Louise was fond of parties, theater and dancing. The joyful Queen became exceedingly popular, not least with the population of Copenhagen.
She died during another pregnancy after only five years as Queen of Denmark in December 19, 1751; she was only 27 years old.


I'd love to know more about her! I heard she's the only one of George II and Queen Caroline's daughters to inherit her mother's charm and common sense. Portraits of her are also welcome! :D

Thank you!
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
-Sherlock Holmes

"Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."

Offline kmerov

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2006, 08:44:34 PM »
Queen Louise is one of the most popular queens in Danish history. I think her father said that "no congratulations are needed, it's just a daughter" when she was born.
Her popularity is as stated in the mini bio, because of her open nature, and insisting in that she and her children learned Danish. Louise and her husband were a popular couple (eventhough he was drunk all the time, and didn't attend to state affairs), since they enyoyed social life and tried to be more close to the people, which wasn't the case with Christian VI and Sophie Magdalene.
Frederik had many affairs during the marriage and his affairs and heavy drinking embarresed Louise.
She protested the negotiations of a future marriage between her daugher Sophie Magdelene and future Gustav III, but without luck. That was the only time she interfered in politics.

Offline kmerov

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2006, 08:46:29 PM »
And a small portrait of Queen Louise.

Offline Prince_Lieven

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #9 on: March 04, 2006, 01:53:36 PM »
Thank you very much for that Kmerov! How did Louisa die?
"How often have I said to you that when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth?"
-Sherlock Holmes

"Men forget, but never forgive; women forgive, but never forget."

Offline Zanthia

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #10 on: March 13, 2006, 04:26:10 PM »
She died during a pregnancy, after only five years as queen. :(
Of Alix: "I was raised in an age of beautiful women, and the two most beautiful was the Empress Elisabeth of Austria and my own mother"  George V

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Offline Yseult

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #11 on: June 07, 2006, 12:46:14 PM »
I know well that there´s info about this woman, but I need to obtain more info! I know that she was a princess of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, that she married Frederick V when he had lost his first wife Louise, that she had children from the marriage and she became powerful after the plot against Struensee, chief minister of her step-son Christian VII and lover of Carolina Mathilda.

Could I obtain more info about this strong woman?

Offline Zanthia

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #12 on: June 07, 2006, 05:07:01 PM »
Juliane was born in 1729, daughter of Duke Ferdinand Albert II and Duchess Antoinette Amalie of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel.
She came to Denmark at the age of 22, to marry the 29-year old king Frederik V. And it was a very ungrateful task, she took upon her shoulders. First and foremost, she replaced the very popular Queen Louise, who had died eight months earlier, and the people was still mourning over the late queen, so she was'nt very popular at her arrival. It did'nt help that she was german. The danish people had found it quite refreshing that Louise was english. Frederik V was a friendly and kind man when he was sober, but he was very often drunk. He was an alkoholic and is said to have been very uncivilized in the erotic area. Never the less, Juliane grow very fond of him, even though he did'nt always returned her feelings and devotion. When he died, she wrote "The best of kings" in her diary. (One can always wonder of the state of Europe's other monarchs! :P)
There is a famous story of her, wanting to surprise the king, who had gone on a hunt at the Eremitage (a small hunting castle, or mansion). When her carriage arrived, a messenger came, saying that the queen was unwanted, and had to return to the palace.
 
Juliane always treated her mother-in-law, the dowager queen Sophie Magdalene, kindly and respectfully. She did her best to be a good stepmother for the king's four children, she was very fond of the little crown prince Christian, calling him "The dear prince". She learned to write and speak danish, but she lacked the gift of gaining on people, and never was very popular, neither at court nor with the people. And then there was the humiliantions she had to stand from her husband's behavior. A human of course can't take a treatment like that for ever, and Juliane slowly developed an intriguing nature. She never missed the oppurtunity to praise her and Frederik's only son, Hereditary Prince Frederik, even he was'nt the genius his mother claimed he was, quite the contradary actually. Juliane had humour, intelligence, and had one of the most impressing private libraries at that time, but she was blind when it came to see the faults of her son and stepchildren.

When her stepson Christian was king, and it became clear that he was insane, she did everything to get her own son closer to the throne. At the infamous night in January 1772, she nearly scared Christian VII to death, when she arrived with her soldiers in the middle of the night. Poor Christian's mind was so darkened with skizophenia and paranoia at this point, that he was convinced that they had come to kill him, so he signed everything they laided before him without objections. From this moment, Juliane, her son and minister Guldberg ruled the country in facto, Christian was still king by name. She had the young queen Caroline Mathilde send into exile and Struensee executed. She reigned until 1784, then she was overthrowend by Crown Prince Frederik, who was now 16 years old and proclaimed Prince Regent. He layed a paper before his father, that said that the dowager queen and her son was stripped of their power, and that the government had to be replaced, and the king signed it. The hereditary tried to snap the paper, but Frederik was too quick and ran out of the room with it. Juliane was furious, and scolded her son, for not being quick enough. She had developed a taste for power, but now it was over. But she never gave up hope for her son being king, and it is said, that she rejoiced when Prince Regent Frederik and Princess Marie's son died in infancy. Then her son would still have a chance.

He never became king, but his son, Christian (VIII), did, although it was commonly known even back then, that Frederik was'nt the father of those intelligent and beautiful children his wife gave birth to.
When looking at Juliane's reaction towards Caroline Mathilde's indiscretion, one can only judge her to be a hypocrit, when she ignored her own daughter-in-law's infidelity. There a certain irony, in Juliane's grandson later married Struensee's granddaughter.

Juliane Marie died in 1796, so she lived to see the french revolution, and in the last seven years of her life, she scared to death with the thought that something similar might happen in Denmark. When Christiansborg burned in 1794, Juliane was convinced that the revolution had come and that she would share fate with Marie Antoinette, and refused to leave her appartments. The guards had to use force, to get her out of the burning palace.
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Zanthia »
Of Alix: "I was raised in an age of beautiful women, and the two most beautiful was the Empress Elisabeth of Austria and my own mother"  George V

"We've invited all the beautiful women we know, but the Princess of Wales in the most beautiful of them all"  Bertie

Offline Yseult

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #13 on: June 07, 2006, 05:42:41 PM »
Thanks a lot, Zanthia!!

Your post is a wonderful portrait of Juliana María.

I became curious about her because I know that prince Frederick, later Frederick VI, and Louisa Augusta were very little ones when the mother Carolina Mathilda was sent to exile after the plot against Struensee. If I´m right, Freddie had three or maybe four years, and Louisa Augusta six months. I think that the two children, with a mental unstable father and a exiled mother, rested under the tutelage of Juliana María.

It must have been a hard situation. I suppose Juliana María felt not as a devoted grand-mother to the children of Carolina Mathilda...in fact, they were not her grand-son or her grand-daughter!! She had her own son, her own daughter-in-law, her own grandsons, so I suppose she did not spend her time giving emotional support to Freddie and Louisa Augusta. Am I right?

I wondered how were these years for the two children...the little crown prince and the "petite Struensee".

Offline Zanthia

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Re: Frederick V, his wives and children
« Reply #14 on: June 08, 2006, 05:21:55 AM »
I don't think there exist many documents about Freddie and Louisas childhood, children was to be seen, not heard at that time. Caroline and Struensee wanted to raise Frederik after the principles of Rousseau, which meant icy baths, a lot of fresh air, (allthough not always dressed to the weather), and only a thin blanket so keep himself warm at night, even if it was freezing outside (no fire was allowed in the fireplace in his room). He also served as kind of a guinea pig for the first vaccinations, but it worked. He and Louisa was very close, probraly because they only had each other to rely on. Later, it hurted Freddie at bit when she and his wife, Marie, could't get along with each other. I think they were more or less ignored by Juliane, and Freddie was wise enough to stay out of her way until he was old enough to take charge of the country. I think Juliane was counting on succeding in having her son take over the throne, so she did'nt find it worth the effort to win Freddie over to her side. It would'nt have been very hard for her, since he was only three years old when it happened.

As for Louisa, she really first was noticed at court when her brother took the power. She was never considered to be princess of Denmark in Juliane's eyes, and as long as she had the power, it was easy for the court to ignore her and speak of her as "la petite struensee". Juliane had been brought up, learning that a wife was the property of her husband, but a husband was'nt the property of his wife. He was allowed to have mistresses and illegitimate children, but the wife was not allowed to have lovers. Then she would bring bastards into the marriage, which was an unforgiveable crime. That's why she never liked Louisa, plus that she'd never liked Struensee.
Louisa was pretty, could be quite friendly, and she was very devoted to Freddie, whom she loved as much as he loved her, but she also was intriguing, especially against her sister-in-law. It is possible she was jealous of Marie, because she no longer had freddie for herself, and because of the fact that Marie was above her in rank. Until Freddie's marriage, she had been the leading lady at court, and was not very pleased to have to take a step back for the new Crown Princess. (A very well-known situation in many royal families throughout history.)
I don't know wether or not she was aware that Struensee was her father, but her behaviour and attemps to always be in center at court and hailed as Princess of Denmark, could point towards that she knew, but was in denial, since she officially was the King's daughter. And it is possible that Juliane might had aired a little remark at one, or maybe several, occasions. (Just like Archduchess Sophia of Austria later did to Empress Sissi's daughter Marie Valerie. After that, Valerie's behaviour was very similar with Louisa's.)

But both Freddie and Louisa was marked with the fact that they never have had a mother, or a father for that matter. Throughout their life, it was like they searched for a certain comfort and securerity. Caroline died so young, she was only 24 I think. If she had lived, I'm sure Freddie would have ordered her back to court. I don't think his father would have cared; his only remark when he heard about his ex-wife's death was: "What a pity, she had good legs."
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Zanthia »
Of Alix: "I was raised in an age of beautiful women, and the two most beautiful was the Empress Elisabeth of Austria and my own mother"  George V

"We've invited all the beautiful women we know, but the Princess of Wales in the most beautiful of them all"  Bertie