Author Topic: 10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...  (Read 5182 times)

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Offline TimM

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10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...
« on: July 16, 2015, 02:51:24 PM »
Since we have one of these for Royals.  Here are my choices.

1.  Abraham Lincoln
2.  Ulysses S. Grant
3.  Teddy Roosevelt
4.  Woodrow Wilson
5. Franklin Delano Roosevelt
6. Harry Truman
7. John F. Kennedy
8. Jimmy Carter
9. Bill Clinton
10. Barack Obama
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Offline edubs31

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Re: 10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2015, 05:04:02 PM »
Guess it all depends on what type of dinner you're looking to have. Something more civil and peaceful? Then maybe ten President's of the same party or sharing similar ideologies. More exciting affair with fiery debate (maybe some food throwing)? Class them together. Far as the ten most entertaining President's are concerned I think I would choose the following...

- George Washington
- Thomas Jefferson
- Andrew Jackson
- Abraham Lincoln
- Ulysses S. Grant
- Teddy Roosevelt
- Franklin Roosevelt
- Harry Truman
- Lyndon Johnson
- Bill Clinton

Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline Nictionary

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Re: 10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...
« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2015, 10:42:14 PM »
For a wild party with music and dancing, I would invite the following presidents, in no particular order:
-- Franklin D. Roosevelt
-- Chester A. Arthur
-- John F. Kennedy
-- William Howard Taft
-- Grover Cleveland
-- George Washington
-- The high school-age Barack Obama (Google "Choom Gang")
-- The pre-1986 George W. Bush (that was the year he quit drinking)
-- Thomas Jefferson
-- Lyndon B. Johnson

Bonus First Lady:  No party would be complete without Dolley Madison.
The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it.

Albert Einstein

Offline Превед

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Re: 10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...
« Reply #3 on: July 31, 2015, 06:26:28 PM »
John Adams (US ambassador to the Dutch Republic, the first country to recognize US independence)
Martin van Buren (the only Dutch-speaking president)
Theodore Roosevelt (Knickerbocker descendant)
Franklin D. Roosevelt (Knickerbocker descendant)
+ if you insist on 10, I'd invite 6 more of the earliest presidents, who had experienced the America of the Legend of Sleepy Hollow.

It would be an evening devoted to a discussion about the heritage of Nieuw Nederland and the Dutch influence on American politics and culture. So I guess herring, cheese, doughnuts and jenever would feature on the menu. :-)


« Last Edit: July 31, 2015, 06:38:36 PM by Превед »
Берёзы севера мне милы,
Их грустный, опущённый вид,
Как речь безмолвная могилы,
Горячку сердца холодит.

(Афанасий Фет: Ивы и берёзы, 1843 / 1856)

Offline edubs31

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Re: 10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2015, 09:12:15 AM »
John Adams (US ambassador to the Dutch Republic, the first country to recognize US independence)
Martin van Buren (the only Dutch-speaking president)
Theodore Roosevelt (Knickerbocker descendant)
Franklin D. Roosevelt (Knickerbocker descendant)
+ if you insist on 10, I'd invite 6 more of the earliest presidents, who had experienced the America of the Legend of Sleepy Hollow.

It would be an evening devoted to a discussion about the heritage of Nieuw Nederland and the Dutch influence on American politics and culture. So I guess herring, cheese, doughnuts and jenever would feature on the menu. :-)


You might want to take Van Buren aside for that discussion. Otherwise expect to see some yawns and, potentially, heavy drinking from your esteemed guests.
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline TimM

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Re: 10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2015, 05:23:01 PM »
Ever notice that some Presidents have slipped beneath the radar. 

I mean everyone has heard of Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln.  However, you mention Fillmore, and you most likely would get "Never heard of him."
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Offline edubs31

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Re: 10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...
« Reply #6 on: August 02, 2015, 05:35:36 PM »
Ever notice that some Presidents have slipped beneath the radar. 

I mean everyone has heard of Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln.  However, you mention Fillmore, and you most likely would get "Never heard of him."

And probably for good reason. Better to be forgotten than to be remembered poorly, which is exactly what Fillmore's abbreviated term was.
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline TimM

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Re: 10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...
« Reply #7 on: August 02, 2015, 05:56:34 PM »
I had to go to Wikipedia to find out about him. 
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Offline Nictionary

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Re: 10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...
« Reply #8 on: August 02, 2015, 09:05:39 PM »
Quote
Ever notice that some Presidents have slipped beneath the radar. 

I mean everyone has heard of Washington, Jefferson, and Lincoln.  However, you mention Fillmore, and you most likely would get "Never heard of him."
I think it depends on a president's accomplishments.  As far as Fillmore,  he is the most forgotten president because he had no significant accomplishments, asserted no political identity, and made no inspiring speeches.  His administration was a historical footnote.  Supposedly, a White House attendant called him "a secondhand president" to his face. 
Fillmore banned alcohol and tobacco from the White House.  He conceded to congressional pressure to support the expansion of slavery, thus exacerbating the events that led to the Civil War.
His administration was so unremarkable that that some historians, in desperation, have convinced themselves of fabricated stories about him.  In 1917 H.L. Mencken, in a satirical column for the "New York Evening Mail" on the origin of the modern bathtub, wrote that Fillmore "gave the bathtub recognition and respectability in the United States."  9 years later, Mencken admitted the joke, calling it "a piece of spoofing to relieve the strain of war," but by then the piece had already corrupted a nave academic community.  As recently as 1981, a biographer credited Fillmore with installing the first tub in the executive mansion, even though the existence of a White House tub was previously mentioned in 1840, when Congressman Charles Ogle attacked the sophisticated Van Buren for being "the first president" to indulge in "the pleasures of the warm and tepid bath" alongside other "proper accompaniments of a palace life."
The Whig's mediocrity has been honored by several tongue-in-cheek barroom fan clubs such as the Millard Fillmore Society, which "is dedicated to the principle that Millard Fillmore was the most incompetent nonentity ever to hold the position of president," according to Rosanne Klass, who applied for membership in the 1970s.  "When I expressed my interest, I was told I had just disqualified myself."Cmvmk
After paying a visit to Fillmore's birthplace in Cayuga County, New York, journalist Phil Arkow founded the Society for the Preservation and Enhancement of the Recognition of Millard Fillmore, Last of the Whigs (SPERMFLOW).  In 1972, the Millard Fillmore Birthday Party Society (MFBPS) considered endowing a college scholarship in Fillmore's name, to be given to students with C averages.  It was a grand idea which, fittingly, never came to fruition.
The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who don't do anything about it.

Albert Einstein

Offline edubs31

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Re: 10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...
« Reply #9 on: August 03, 2015, 11:50:58 AM »
Nice write up there Nictionary!

Another amusing story I remember hearing from the satirical Millard Fillmore Society is how they gather each year at the cemetery he's buried on the anniversary of his death to perform a mock ceremony. More or less lampooning his unremarkable Presidency.

More than unremarkable however I find Fillmore to be bad. As you point out he more or less acquiesced to the expansion of slavery and was a traitor to the north, or "Doughface" as politicians of his ilk were being referred to at the time.

The Whigs made terribly and ultimately costly decisions on what leaders they selected to represent them at the Presidential level. In 1836 they ran multiple candidates in an attempt to derail Democrat Martin Van Buren's bid for the Oval Office in the electoral college. They must have looked at the election of 1824 for inspiration. Andrew Jackson won both the popular & electoral votes in 1824, but still lost the Presidency to John Quincy Adams who was positioned as the "compromise" candidate between the four main candidates - Jackson, Adams, Henry Clay, William Crawford - running. But their plan backfired and Van Buren won easily.

Four years later with Van Buren severely wounded and presiding over a shaky at best economy the Whig's could have probably defeated the President with any serious nominee. Logically this would have meant tapping prolific congressman Henry Clay for the nomination. But instead they decided to nominate the old and frail William Henry Harrison who died a month after his inauguration. Finally clay was able to win his party's support by 1844 but he lost narrowly that year to James K. Polk. Afterwards you had a mediocrity like Zachary Taylor (the party proving they were still hung up on war heroes) elected but dying without much in the way of accomplishments less than a year and a half into his term. That led to Fillmore's forgotten 2 1/2 year Presidency.

The Whigs had vanished from the political landscape by 1856 with most southerners defecting to the Democrats and most northerners joining the newly formed Republican Party.
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right...

Offline TimM

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Re: 10 U.S. Presidents You Would Invite To A Dinner Party...
« Reply #10 on: August 04, 2015, 12:01:42 PM »
I guess the Whigs are now just a footnote in U.S. political history.
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