Author Topic: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg  (Read 108342 times)

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Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #75 on: April 22, 2007, 03:33:04 PM »
Well, I would encourage anyone to buy CZ's books--they're absolute musts. However, there is one photo of Sandra as a youngster out of the 3 books (From Cradle to Crown, QV's Family, and Camera and the Tsars).
They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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Offline bell_the_cat

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #76 on: April 22, 2007, 04:01:43 PM »
that makes sense, but I think joining in when it starts to look advantageous is even more of an indictment of passively or actively endorsing the party's agenda. 'jumping on the band wagon' are enablers who are often times the force and power behind a movement.

That said, this was the same period when many world notables thought this national socialist invention had something going for it. Ford, Kennedy, of course the Windsors, Lindberg, Brundage and others said some fairly positive things about what was going on at that time.

Sorry, folks,  the date was actually May 1 1937. It was the same day that many other royals joined the party (e.g. "Mossy", Georg Donatus of Hesse, his wife Cecile and brother Ludwig). According to "The Royals and the Reich" certain people were not able to be members up till then, and this was the first day they were allowed to join. Alexandra's daughter Alexandra had already joined in 1933, so maybe she was a more enthusiastic  Nazi.

Otherwise I agree with you, Herr Kaiser, that a passive endorsement of the Nazi agenda is every bit as bad as an active one...
Never put off until tomorrow what you can put off until the day after tomorrow. (Mark Twain)

Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #77 on: April 23, 2007, 02:16:07 AM »
Well I cannot agree with you too. A lot of them joined because of afraid of persecution and fear. That is not the same as getting in uniform and parading in pleasure.  >:(

Offline basilforever

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #78 on: April 23, 2007, 12:33:05 PM »
Mmm, I agree Eric. A passive endorsement is not every bit as bad as an active one, especially if the passive endorsement was done under pressure, or done reluctantly. I an not sure exactly of why Sandra passively endorsed the party. :-\
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Offline Eric_Lowe

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #79 on: April 24, 2007, 04:34:06 AM »
Well...I think there was political pressure to conform. Even if you do however you might still end up like poor Princess Malfeda or Crown Princess Antonia of Bavaria.  :(

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #80 on: April 24, 2007, 10:51:06 AM »
CPss Antonia ended up the way she did (her health ruined after being interned) because he husband Rupprecht wouldn't conform and was a serious pain to the Nazi party, going all the way back to the Munich Beer Hall Putsch in 1923. Rupprecht & Antonia even educated their children in England and prevented them from becoming members of the Hitler Youth. In order to avoid membership in the Nazi University Student Corps, Rupert's nephew Ludwig withdrew from his university in Germany, and began studies at the University of Budapest. The Bavarian royals actually stood up to the Nazi regime rather than conforming. While Rupprecht escaped the Nazis, his wife, their children and Rupprecht's grandchildren (by his eldest son) paid the price. Mafalda paid the price (dying in agony at Buchenwald) for her father's (King Victor Emmanuel of Italy) falling out with Hitler. In May 1943 Hitler issued the "Decree Concerning Internationally Connected Men" declaring that princes, including Mafalda's husband Philip, could not hold positions in the party, state, or armed forces. The arrest of Mussolini by King Victor Emanuel in July made Phillip's position even more difficult. Hitler believed that Philipp and his family were complicit in Mussolini's downfall. Neither Antonia nor Mafalda can be used as examples of those who 'just went along' but were still ill-treated by Hitler, in my opinion.
« Last Edit: April 24, 2007, 11:03:09 AM by grandduchessella »
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Offline basilforever

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #81 on: April 24, 2007, 10:57:55 AM »
It all goes to show the Nazis had no respect for Royalty.  >:( Poor Princess Mafalda.  :'(
His Royal Highness Prince Albert Victor Christian Edward of Wales, Duke of Clarence and Avondale, Earl of Athlone, Knight of The Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight of The Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #82 on: April 24, 2007, 11:05:21 AM »
People who are responsible for the deaths of millions, including many of their own citizens, don't have respect for human life, royal or otherwise.

Some related topics:

German Royals and Nazism/Royals and the Reich
http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php/topic,4071.0.html

Princess Mafalda
http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php/topic,1962.0.html

Crown Prince Rupprecht
http://forum.alexanderpalace.org/index.php/topic,3145.0.html
« Last Edit: April 24, 2007, 11:07:23 AM by grandduchessella »
They also serve who only stand and wait--John Milton
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Offline basilforever

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #83 on: April 24, 2007, 11:11:34 AM »
Yes of course, but I meant it was not a part of the Nazi philosophy/ideology to have any respect for Royals because they were Royalty. Thanks for the links.
His Royal Highness Prince Albert Victor Christian Edward of Wales, Duke of Clarence and Avondale, Earl of Athlone, Knight of The Most Noble Order of the Garter, Knight of The Most Illustrious Order of St Patrick

Offline HerrKaiser

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #84 on: April 24, 2007, 03:54:35 PM »
I agree with Grandduchessella and bell the cat. Even though Princess Alexandra may not have bloody hands herself, her passive acceptance was the same thing the majority of Germans did (most of whom were NOT nazi party members) and they have paid the high price of defeat and reparations and global distain. If we are to accept Pcss Alexandra and her children's joining up with the party as a mere means to protect their own status, then the world owes all of Germany a huge apology. But instead, she should bear the yoke of dishonor the others of her country have born who did not join the party. Not being a nazi was not a death sentence or imprisonable. She could have opted out and been sidelined, but if her convictions were noble, she did not stand by them.
HerrKaiser

Offline grandduchessella

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #85 on: April 24, 2007, 09:19:31 PM »
In a review on the BRMB about the new Spanish bio of Baby Bee, it says this:

"Princess Alexandra (Sandra) of Hohenlohe-Langenburg is presented in a very poor light throughout the book: envious of her sisters, mean, ugly. She took many of her motherīs jewels after the Russian Revolution and left her mother almost starving."

I don't know exactly what basis that's on, but it does say the writer was able to access hundreds of letters that Baby Bee wrote/had written to her--that she fortunately never destroyed them. I think the author also was able to interview Bee before she died.
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Offline Laura_

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #86 on: April 25, 2007, 08:40:13 AM »
ugly??  :)

Offline Svetabel

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #87 on: April 25, 2007, 11:13:46 AM »
ugly??  :)
well, in contrast to her pretty sisters :)

Offline Laura_

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #88 on: April 25, 2007, 12:01:35 PM »
i dont know i find her prettier than Ducky. as a young princess she was prettier than many of her cousins too. and she was one of the four sisters who had been considered the most beautiful princesses of their generation as many authors note.
i think the word''ugly'' is way over exagerated when talking about Princess Alexandra  :)
« Last Edit: April 25, 2007, 12:07:49 PM by Laurra »

Offline XJaseyRaeX

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Re: Princess Alexandra of Hohenlohe-Langenburg
« Reply #89 on: April 25, 2007, 02:08:24 PM »
i always thought sandra was pretty and an adorable child when she was little...were they talking about actual physical features or her personality as being 'ugly' ?


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