Author Topic: Metternich - Winneberg  (Read 81863 times)

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Offline bel air

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #30 on: August 21, 2006, 05:18:25 PM »
I was so fortunate to know furstinTatiana. Mere days before leaving the states for what I thought was a mere visit to europe, based in Amsterdam, I received a post card inviting me to phone her once I arrived in Amsterdam. I had plans to travel on to Paris, when my Amsterdam living situation and research project became more involved, and I received a firm invitation to present myself at Johannisberg at a certain time on a certain day.
The train, traveling down the west bank of the Rhine, passed Johannisberg on the left, it's necessary to take the train to Frankfurt Airport, then drive back up the Rheingau to Rudesheim and Geisenheim to reach Johannisberg. The site up on the hilltop from below was magnificent!
Terse and to the point at first, furstin von Metternich really scooped me up and took over my travel plans and destinations. Thankfully, I made a good enough impression to be recommended to,  and to meet, prinzessin Margaret von Hessen, prinz Enrico d'Assia, graf Matuschka, and many others. All were charming, educated, gracious, extremely well read and traveled, and so generous with their time.
My coorespondence with furstin von Mettenich lasted many years, and I began an acquaintance with her nephew Mischka, son of her sister Missie, author of "Berlin Diaries," surely one of the best book of memoirs of the second World War.
A great, great and interesting lady, last representative of many long gone generations, and probably the last true White Russian!

Offline Prince_Christopher

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Offline Lucien

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #32 on: September 10, 2006, 12:23:56 PM »
Schloss Johannisberg,once home of Prince Paul and Princess Tatiana Metternich:

http://www.schloss-johannisberg.com/frame.htm

Hillenraad castle,Swalmen,The Netherlands,home of Countess E.Wollf-Metternich,

http://www.kasteleninnederland.com/fotodetails.php?fid=600

Courtesy John Wennips.
Je Maintiendrai

Offline Eurohistory

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #33 on: September 10, 2006, 09:49:29 PM »
Fürst Paul Alfons was the sixth title-holder and last Prince von Metternich-Winneburg. 

Sadly, his marriage to Princess Tatiana Wassiltchikov (1915-2006) remained childess, although it is strongly rumored in aristocratic circles that Fürst Paul fathered at least two children by other titled ladies.

Fürst Paul Alfons died in 1992. He was 75 years old.

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Offline Lucien

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #34 on: September 11, 2006, 12:50:40 PM »
Upon his death Princess Tatiana was left "more or less" pennyless as Prince Paul's mistress inherited the bulk,oh men....
Je Maintiendrai

Offline ipflo

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #35 on: September 18, 2006, 02:37:24 AM »
thx for the info

So there are no longer metternich's. and how does duke Frans Albrecht Metternich Sandor relates to the Metternich family?

ipflo

Offline MarieCharlotte

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #36 on: September 18, 2006, 05:56:55 AM »
Dear ipflo,

Clemens von Metternich had a daughter called Léontine (1811-1861) by his first wife Marie Eleonore von Kaunitz-Rietberg. She was married to Moritz Graf Sándor von Szlavnicza (died 1878). Léontine and Moritz had a daughter, Pauline Gräfin Sándor von Szlavnicza (1836-1921).
Richard von Metternich (1829-1895), Clemens von Metternich's only child by his second wife Maria Antonia von Leykam, married his niece Pauline in 1856. The couple had three daughters: Sophie (1857-1941), Antoinette (1862-1890) and Clémentine (1870-1963).
Sophie married Albrecht Fürst zu Oettingen-Oettingen und Oettingen-Spielberg. Sophie's only daughter Elisabeth Pauline (1886-1976) was married to Viktor Duke von Ratibor, Fürst von Corvey, Prince zu Hohenlohe-Schillingsfürst-Breunner-Enkevoirth (1879-1945). Elisabeth and Victor had a son, Franz Albrecht. In 1926 or 1927 Franz Albrecht was adopted by his grandmother Sophie's sister Clémentine and took the additional surname "Metternich-Sándor".

Clemens von Metternich > Richard von Metternich > Sophie zu Oettingen, née von Metternich > Elisabeth Pauline Duchess of Ratibor (etc.), née zu Oettingen > Franz Albrecht

but we could also say:

Clemens von Metternich > Léontine Gräfin Sándor von Szlavnicza, née Metternich > Pauline von Metternich, née Gräfin Sándor von Szlavnicza > Sophie zu Oettingen, née von Metternich > Elisabeth Pauline Duchess of Ratibor (etc.), née zu Oettingen > Franz Albrecht
« Last Edit: September 18, 2006, 06:02:31 AM by MarieCharlotte »
Ich aber breite trauernd aus
die weiten weissen Schwingen,
Und kehr' ins Feenreich nach Haus -
Nichts soll mich wieder bringen.


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Rani

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #37 on: September 22, 2006, 09:43:43 AM »
Hello! Here are some pictures of Tatiana.




Tatianas parents. I forgot the names. Iwill look at them.





Tatiana and her husband Paul metternich.




bye, bye!




« Last Edit: January 25, 2013, 01:47:04 PM by Svetabel »

Rani

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #38 on: November 01, 2006, 08:30:15 AM »


Can anyone tell anything about her? I know that she was the big Diva in Vienna, and the enemy of Sisi.

Offline gogm

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #39 on: November 01, 2006, 10:27:56 PM »
When in France, she discovered the house of Worth and acquainted her friend, the Empress Eugenie, with Worth. That launched the house of Worth, the first modern couture house.

I believe she may have been involved in an incident later on when her husband and she walked out of a soiree hosted by Napolen III and Eugenie on hearing that Maximilian had been shot in Mexico. The French were propping up Maximilian until the U. S. Civil War ended and thousands of battle-hardened U. S. troops, probably the best in the world then, were moved to the border with Mexico to enforce the Monroe Doctrine (Europeans keep out, this hemisphere is ours).

Offline Yseult

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #40 on: November 02, 2006, 03:02:15 AM »



Leontine Adelheid Marie Pauline of Metternich-Winneburg was one of the daughters of prince Klemens von Metternich-Winneburg by his first wife, Eleonore (Laure) von Kaunitz-Rietberg. Leontine was married, when she had twenty-four, with an hungarian count, Moriz Sándor of Szlavnicza, known in the Empire as a passionate horseman. One year after the wedding Moriz & Leontine, they had their only daughter, Pauline Clementine Marie Walburga Sándor of Szlavnicza, born in Wien 26th February 1836.

Pauline spent her whole childhood in the Wien residence of her maternal grand-father, prince Metternich, who lived with his third wife, Melanie Zichy-Ferraris. Of course, Paulina knew from her most tender age Richard, the only son born in the second marriage of Metternich with lovely Maria Antonia von Leykam, so a younger half-brother of Leontine and uncle of Pauline ;) On June 1856, Richard, twenty seven years old, married his niece Pauline, twenty years old. It was a love match. They were happy, despite the frequent affairs of Richard with actresses. I suppose that Pauline could understand very well her unfaifthful husband. Richard had a deep resemblance with his father, Pauline´s grand-father, Klemens. As a young diplomat, Richard wished to became an emminence of european diplomacy as his father was, and, in his private life, Richard followed the line traced by Klemens, too... Remember that old Metternich had a very succesful marriage with his first wife Eleonore (grand-mother of Pauline) as he had extra conjugal relationships with notorious women as the russian Ekaterine Bragation, the princess of Courland Wilhelmine Biron or, later, Dorothea princess Lieven ;)

Pauline, a energetic and passionate woman, ardent patron of music, accompanied her husband to the diplomatic missions at Dresden and, later, Paris. This was another connection to her grand-mother Eleonore, who, as a newly married, accompanied Klemens to diplomatic missions at Dresde and Paris, too ;)

Richard and Pauline had three daughters:

1.-Sophie Marie Antoinette Leontine Melanie Julie Metternich-Sándor von Winneburg.
2.-Antoinette Pascaline Metternich-Sándor von Winneburg.
3.-Klementine Marie Melanie Sophie Leontine Crescentia Metternich-Sándor von Winneburg.

The younger daughter, Klementine, was badly injured by her dog in her childhood. She survived, but she was disfigured...and she decided never to marry due her scarred face. Another tragedy in Pauline´s life happened in 1890, when her son-in-law Georg Wilhelm von Waldstein, insane and alcoholic, murdered his wife Antoinette Pascaline in Duchkov. This also remembered her grand-mother Eleonore, who suffered a lot when she lost before time his two elder daughters, the clever and lovely Marie (favourite of her father) and the beautiful Clementine.

Pictures of Pauline:







Pauline described herself as the "best-dressed monkey at Paris". She was not a beauty, but she had her own style and she became the face of fashion in Second Empire. French courtiers nicknamed her "Madame Chiffon", but, at the same time, all their wives and daughters wished to wear chiffon dresses in a special tone of green as Pauline did. She was always a woman of character, who performed operas an her house playing a role herself, but also fought a duel in Liechtenstein, on 1892, with countess Kielmansegg over arrangements at the Vienna Musical and Theatrical Exhibition!
« Last Edit: January 25, 2013, 01:07:57 PM by Svetabel »

Rani

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #41 on: November 02, 2006, 07:53:15 AM »
Thank you for the information! In all books about Sisi, there was always written that she was a ugly women and a Gossip-Lady!  :-\
I think she was a cool girl! :D

Offline ashdean

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #42 on: November 02, 2006, 10:58:20 AM »
In her book Victorian Gallery, Meriel Buchanan has a brief chapter on the legendary Princess..

Offline Yseult

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #43 on: November 02, 2006, 04:49:02 PM »
Thank you for the information! In all books about Sisi, there was always written that she was a ugly women and a Gossip-Lady!  :-\
I think she was a cool girl! :D

Well, the Winterhalter´s portrait flatter her, but, indeed, Pauline was not a beauty, she seems a ugly woman when you look at the pictures taken on her. A gossip-lady...mnnnn, maybe. I have read somewhere that her enemies at Wien nicknamed her "Mauline", from "mauvaise langue"... I think that Pauline enjoyed so much her role as a reputed socialite, the most fashionable lady of her times. She was clever and she had plenty of entertaining ideas. She was just the opposite to Sissi ;)

Another portrait of Pauline as an aged woman:




Offline Rebecca

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Re: Metternich - Winneberg
« Reply #44 on: November 02, 2006, 05:44:02 PM »
The weapon chosen in the duel between princess Pauline and countess Kielmannsegg was sword.  :o In the third round the princess got a cut on her nose... :o ... at the same time as the countess was slightly injured in her arm. The seconds (two other noble ladies) then quickly declared the duel ended...  :D
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