Author Topic: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news  (Read 100347 times)

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Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #30 on: September 18, 2006, 07:42:08 AM »
I've also found this article from thE uNESCO in St Petersburg,informatrions about the New holand restoration by Norman Foster architect of the Reichstag among others...

http://whc.unesco.org/archive/2006/mis540-2006.pdf#search=%22world%20heritage%20report%20on%20the%20mission%20to%20St%20petersburg%20february%203%20%22

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Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #31 on: September 18, 2006, 07:49:13 AM »
If some have illustrations of the project of reniovation of the new holland(it would be a concert hall,an hotel and a large park of entertainment)?

Thanks you in advance...

Vassili

As for the complex in St Pdetersburg can someone tell if the architecture will be modern or not?

One may also noticed that the old buildings of the jail will be turned in an hotel.

Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #32 on: September 18, 2006, 05:43:59 PM »
I've just read that Putin has taken the Polovtsov dacha in Petersburg environs to make it his personal home...Has the restoration always started?

Some pics of the dach there:http://enlight.ru/camera/31/index_e.html

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Offline Robert_Hall

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #33 on: September 18, 2006, 06:11:18 PM »
If it is the dacha I was shown last springtime- it is well finished.
 Also, the New Holland island complex was still closed to access  due to the major fire of 2 years [?] ago. But, it looked fascinating to explore. I do hope something good comes from the development.
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Offline Belochka

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #34 on: September 18, 2006, 07:47:21 PM »
Also, the New Holland island complex was still closed to access  due to the major fire of 2 years [?] ago. But, it looked fascinating to explore. I do hope something good comes from the development.


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Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #35 on: October 24, 2006, 03:40:03 AM »
I've found this page in russian on the Polovtsov's dacha interiors

http://archi.ru/publications/virtual/fomin/text/2_polovcova.htm

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Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #36 on: October 30, 2006, 06:14:39 AM »
As I put it before in account of the fact the G8 is ended I will use this page for all that concern urban life in Petersburg...

A serie of shot of staircases in Petersburg:in the fontanka there:(al of this is an extract from the book Les maisons russes,I hope ther would be nor problem with rights...)
This is known as house Tourgueniev:



The hall of Tourgeuniv's house(restored a few before)


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Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #37 on: October 31, 2006, 06:19:14 AM »
On those book you can also found the restoration of this flat Petrograd part of the town near St Peter and St Paul...After years of neglect,it is now a "trendy"place where oligarchs and business of sT Petersburg use to live ...




Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #38 on: November 01, 2006, 07:21:15 AM »
And to finish some interiors of a prerevolutional flat turned into a commutarian appartement during soviet times and which have recover its original shape (everything was lost :from the floor in marquetry to the  earthenware stove)during the last decade owing to a conscencious and intresting restoration...

Just have a see and think to what could have glitter  middle-class or upper-class apartments before thr revolution...






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Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #39 on: November 01, 2006, 07:26:11 AM »
I had forgotten the staircase of Chaliapline apartemlent on the canal Griboiedov...


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Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #40 on: November 19, 2006, 11:01:19 AM »
New things on new holland project,I believe it was respectuous of the whole building but according to wandering camera it is not,the text I found on it(I can not translate rather wall(please use automaic transaltor or anything else...)The view of the project is not as interesteing as I believe at first sight...
http://www.enlight.ru/camera/377/index.html

Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #41 on: December 03, 2006, 05:40:27 PM »
Mariinsky Theater Opens New Concert Hall
By Galina Stolyarova
Staff Writer



Valery Gergiev, the indefatigable artistic director of the Mariinsky Theater, was triumphant on Wednesday at the inauguration of the theater's brand-new, state-of-the-art concert hall, located in the company's former warehouse on Ulitsa Pisareva, a few hundred meters from the historical building.A 2 1/2 hour gala performance featuring such top-flight international performers as Russian violinists Vadim Repin and Maxim Vengerov, Chinese pianist Lang Lang and Russian tenor Vladimir Galuzin, alongside the Mariinsky Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Gergiev, marked the launch ceremony.
"This is perhaps the first time in modern Russia when private sponsors have invested more than the state into a grand-scale cultural project," the maestro said.
Russia's Finance Minister Alexei Kudrin said $15 million of state money was invested into the concert hall, in addition to $24 million that came from private companies and individuals.

Six individual donors, Moscow mayor Yury Luzhkov, RUSAL chairman Oleg Deripaska and Akhmed Bilalov, the deputy head of the Russian Duma Committee on CIS Affairs, gave money to the Mariinsky.
"The opening of this hall marks the beginning of a new era for Russia," Kudrin said after the concert on Wednesday. "It shows that the country is getting stronger and in such grand-scale cultural projects state support goes hand in hand with private sponsorship. I find it a most encouraging sign."
The story of the Mariinsky's new concert hall, which is also referred to as the theater's "third stage," is almost literally the story of a phoenix rising from the ashes.
In September 2003, the warehouse on Ulitsa Pisareva nearly perished in a massive blaze that destroyed scenery for at least 30 of the theater's productions that was stored there. It was later decided to use the space for a modern concert hall and construction began in June 2005.
"We expect to receive some of the world's finest performers here, and very soon," Gergiev said. One of the confirmed arrangements is a visit of the London Symphony Orchestra, which Gergiev is now leading as artistic director.
Trade and Economic Development Minister German Gref made a metaphorical reference to what he felt was a much greater fire.
"The need for the revival of the burnt premises and the need for a new concert venue were great indeed but Valery Gergiev's commendable burning enthusiasm for his theater made a much stronger impression," he said after the gala on Wednesday.
Kudrin was enthusiastic about the Mariinsky's ambitious plans for further expansion.

"The next step will be the construction of the theater's 'second stage,' [a new theater to run alongside its historic building] which will be covered entirely by the federal budget, and which we hope to complete within the next three years," Kudrin said. "After that we will get to the renovation of the Mariinsky's historic premises."
Designed by the French architect Xavier Fabre in the shape of a child's cradle, the new concert hall can seat 1,100 people. Good visibility and excellent acoustics are hallmarks of the new space.
"It was my premier goal to make all seats in the audience comfortable," Fabre said at a news briefing on Wednesday. "And this is a very multifunctional space, open to experiments with scenery, genres, and new forms of artistic activities."
Japanese acoustician Yasuhisa Toyota of the internationally acclaimed Nagata Acoustics was responsible for the hall's acoustics. The company prides itself on the exceptional sound of some of the world's most distinguished classical venues, including Japan's Sapporo and Kawasaki concert halls and the U.S. Walt Disney concert hall in Los Angeles.
"Some of the world's most sought-after violinists performed here tonight; they played their beautiful instruments, a Gvarneri and a Stradivari," Gergiev said, referring to Vengerov and Repin. "I am very proud that the new instrument of our own, the new hall, lived up to the challenge."
Canadian maple Yasuhisa Toyota's preferred material was ordered for the hall's interiors. Local experts had suggested the Karelian pine but as the acoustician has not worked with the material, the maple was requested.
Everything about the new hall has a personal touch.
Gergiev personally selected several types of seats for the auditorium they differ depending on their location in the hall which were commissioned from a French furniture factory.
After the gala, Japanese diplomats mounted the stage to award Gergiev Japan's prestigious Order of the Rising Sun for the musician's personal input into the country's cultural life the Mariinsky tours Japan frequently and extensively and his support for emerging young talent in Japan.
"There are just 300 grams of wood in a violin but what makes a Stradivari precious is its marvelous acoustics," he said. "Likewise, we could have spent three hundred million dollars on this hall but its value is in its acoustics," said Gergiev.
Earlier Wednesday President Vladimir Putin visited the new concert hall and sat in on a rehearsal for the gala.

Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #42 on: December 03, 2006, 05:42:35 PM »
Skyscraper scandal
By Steven Lee Myers
the new york times


The winning design for Gazprom's new skyscraper in St. Petersburg is announced on Friday, but not everyone is happy about it.On Friday, the authorities are to announce the winner of a design competition that will usher in a new era of progress and prosperity or ruin one of the world's most beautiful cities. In this debate, it seems, there is no middle ground.Russia's state-controlled energy company, Gazprom, invited six foreign architects to submit drawings of a proposed business center, anchored by a soaring skyscraper for its newly acquired oil subsidiary. And then in an unusual gesture of openness for construction projects in this country, the company asked the public to comment, even to vote.
The consequent furor seems unlikely to subside soon.

The proposals, now on exhibition at the Academy of Arts and viewable on the web at www.gazprom-city.info, include stylish modern buildings that evoke, among other things, a curtain of glass, a gas-fueled flame, a strand of DNA and a lady's high-heeled shoe.
The most vehement reactions, however, have been to the project's scale and to its site, a historic one where the Neva River meets the Bolshaya Okhta, opposite the ornate, blue-and-white Smolny Cathedral.
The main tower in each proposal would be three or four times higher than the city's most famous landmarks, including Smolny, St. Isaac's Cathedral, the Admiralty, and the Peter and Paul Cathedral, the golden spire of which reaches 122.5 meters, or 404 feet, the city's tallest building excluding the 310-meter television tower in the northern part of the city.
A building of that height, the project's critics argue, would irrevocably mar a cityscape that Unesco has declared a World Heritage Site.
"Even if it were made of solid gold," said Vladimir Popov, president of the Union of Architects of St. Petersburg and a critic of Gazprom's project, "it would nevertheless kill the city."
The architects' union has refused to participate in the jury Gazprom has chosen to evaluate the designs and threatened to file suit to stop the winner from ever being built. The director of the State Hermitage Museum, Mikhail Piotrovsky, has also inveighed against the project, organizing meetings of preservationists and architects to propose alternative sites.
"Something the city needs is development," Piotrovsky said in an interview in his museum office in the Winter Palace, which itself established acceptable height limits for most buildings for decades, "but let's not destroy the old city."
Gazprom, however, has certain advantages that make the skyscraper appear inevitable, despite the public outcry.
Not least of them is the fact that the company is, effectively, an arm of the Kremlin and is now the world's fourth largest company by stock value, worth more than $250 billion.
The project also has the support of St. Petersburg's leaders, including Governor Valentina Matviyenko, who has championed the new business center, with an estimated cost exceeding $2 billion, as a sorely needed economic boost for a city that has long suffered in Moscow's shadow.
President Vladimir Putin, a native of St. Petersburg, has long supported efforts to relocate companies and government bodies to the city.

Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #43 on: December 03, 2006, 05:56:19 PM »
  
The winning design for Gazprom's new skyscraper in St. Petersburg is announced on Friday, but not everyone is happy about it.On Friday, the authorities are to announce the winner of a design competition that will usher in a new era of progress and prosperity or ruin one of the world's most beautiful cities. In this debate, it seems, there is no middle ground.Russia's state-controlled energy company, Gazprom, invited six foreign architects to submit drawings of a proposed business center, anchored by a soaring skyscraper for its newly acquired oil subsidiary. And then in an unusual gesture of openness for construction projects in this country, the company asked the public to comment, even to vote.
The consequent furor seems unlikely to subside soon.
The proposals, now on exhibition at the Academy of Arts and viewable on the web at www.gazprom-city.info, include stylish modern buildings that evoke, among other things, a curtain of glass, a gas-fueled flame, a strand of DNA and a lady's high-heeled shoe.
The most vehement reactions, however, have been to the project's scale and to its site, a historic one where the Neva River meets the Bolshaya Okhta, opposite the ornate, blue-and-white Smolny Cathedral.
The main tower in each proposal would be three or four times higher than the city's most famous landmarks, including Smolny, St. Isaac's Cathedral, the Admiralty, and the Peter and Paul Cathedral, the golden spire of which reaches 122.5 meters, or 404 feet, the city's tallest building excluding the 310-meter television tower in the northern part of the city.
A building of that height, the project's critics argue, would irrevocably mar a cityscape that Unesco has declared a World Heritage Site.
"Even if it were made of solid gold," said Vladimir Popov, president of the Union of Architects of St. Petersburg and a critic of Gazprom's project, "it would nevertheless kill the city."
The architects' union has refused to participate in the jury Gazprom has chosen to evaluate the designs and threatened to file suit to stop the winner from ever being built. The director of the State Hermitage Museum, Mikhail Piotrovsky, has also inveighed against the project, organizing meetings of preservationists and architects to propose alternative sites.
"Something the city needs is development," Piotrovsky said in an interview in his museum office in the Winter Palace, which itself established acceptable height limits for most buildings for decades, "but let's not destroy the old city."
Gazprom, however, has certain advantages that make the skyscraper appear inevitable, despite the public outcry.
Not least of them is the fact that the company is, effectively, an arm of the Kremlin and is now the world's fourth largest company by stock value, worth more than $250 billion.
The project also has the support of St. Petersburg's leaders, including Governor Valentina Matviyenko, who has championed the new business center, with an estimated cost exceeding $2 billion, as a sorely needed economic boost for a city that has long suffered in Moscow's shadow.

Offline Vassili_Vorontsoff

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Re: Restorations and renovations in St.Petersburg - news
« Reply #44 on: December 03, 2006, 05:59:58 PM »
That the city's zoning laws forbid anything in that area higher than 48 meters appears to be no obstacle, recalling a Russian aphorism: "It is forbidden, but if you really want it, then it is possible."

Gazprom officials said they would seek to have the law changed once a design was chosen.
Gazprom has embraced for itself the legacy of Peter the Great, who built the city by decree at the beginning of the 18th century to become a new capital and Russia's "window on the West." And like Peter the Great, the company turned to foreign architects, not Russian ones, inviting seven to submit designs.

Six agreed: Jean Nouvel of Paris; Massimiliano Fuksas of Rome; the Swiss team Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron; Rem Koolhaas of the Netherlands; the British collective RMJM London; and Daniel Libeskind, the Polish-born American who designed the master plan for the new World Trade Center site in New York City.
Nikolai Tanayev, general director of Gazprom Neft Invest, the subsidiary overseeing the project, said the project was intended to restore the city's status as a bridge to European culture and investment. He compared today's criticism to that lodged against the construction of the Eiffel Tower in Paris more than a century ago.
"We live in the 21st century, not in the 18th," he said. "Views are different. If you spoke of launching satellites in the 18th century, you would have been accused of devil worship."
At the Academy of Arts, on the Neva embankment, the exhibition has drawn the curious to see models of the six proposals. Visitors are asked to vote for their favorite on a ballot that declares, "The City Chooses the Future." People may also vote online.
One irony, not lost on some, is that the city's voters no longer have the right to choose their governor, a chief supporter of the project, following Putin's abolition of direct elections for regional leaders in 2004.
Nor can they vote "against all," another ballot choice eliminated from Russian elections this year.
Ilya Tatarinov, an architectural student, expressed doubt that the public's choice would sway Gazprom (and the company said that the voting would be only one factor in a final decision). But he had little doubt that the project would proceed.
"It is absolutely not appropriate for the city," he said, "but most likely they will build it regardless."
A worn factory now occupies the site now covered in a giant panel announcing Gazprom's project. Although few object to revitalizing the area, which is rundown, some opponents noted that it was the site of a Swedish fort from the 17th century and thus has archeological significance.
And while the site is more than 10 kilometers from the center of the city, they argue that its main tower would be visible from almost any point in the city, destroying what Aleksandr Margolis, the head of the Charitable Fund for the Saving of Petersburg and Leningrad, called an architectural harmony largely unaltered for nearly three centuries.
The project's supporters counter that the city of Pushkin, Gogol and Dostoyevsky, Tchaikovsky, Diaghilev and Shostakovich not to mention Lenin and the Bolsheviks should not let its past bind its future.
"There is a mistaken belief that St. Petersburg's center has remained unchanged since it was founded," the city's vice governor, Aleksandr Vakhmistrov, said in a written response to questions. "In the last 300 years, however, the city has changed. New houses have been built in place of old ones."
He went on: "St. Petersburg should preserve its architectural traditions, but should not reject improvement."