Author Topic: Airplanes (well, almost...)  (Read 14499 times)

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Offline Mike

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Airplanes (well, almost...)
« on: September 01, 2004, 08:27:34 AM »
While no member of the imperial family was known to fly (at least before the revolution), it would be incorrect to say that they never boarded a plane. Just the planes stayed on the ground:

Nicolas II aboard the Russkiy Vityaz with its designer Igor Sikorsky.
GD Kyrilll Vladimirovich inspects an Ilya Muromets bomber during WWI.

« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by Mike »

Offline Joanna

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2004, 01:40:29 PM »
Hi Mike,

I had thought that Nicholas' brother GD Michael had flown. There are numerous photos of him at airfields and did he not have an official designation with the fledging Imperial Russian Air Force during WWI?

Joanna

Offline Mike

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2004, 02:31:31 PM »
It was GD Alexander Mikhailovich (Sandro) who was in fact commander-in-chief  (although under different titles) of the Russian air force before and during WWI. But even he seems to have never flown before the 1920s, when he already was in emigration.

Offline Margarita Markovna

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2005, 11:15:51 AM »
Did Russia use planes in WWI?

Offline Forum Admin

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2005, 11:50:08 AM »
Yes,
The russian air force was as adavanced as any at the time.  The largest airplane built during WWI was Russian.

Offline Margarita Markovna

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2005, 08:24:10 AM »
Wow...learn a new thing every day!  ;D

Offline Phil_tomaselli

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #6 on: February 17, 2006, 06:05:26 AM »
The Provisional Government even allowed women to train as combat pilots though I don't think any actually served in action.

I have a very poor copy of the flying certificate of Princess Dolgoruki who qualified in 1917.

Many officers & men of the Imperial Air Service went over to the Whites in 1918/19 and flew in action on all the civil war fronts.

Phil T

Offline frimousse

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2006, 06:33:46 PM »
 :) Following the first post here is Nicholas II inspecting the Russian plane "Russkyi Vitiaz" from Sikorsky's factory
1) Emperor goes up



26 july 1912

Offline frimousse

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #8 on: March 29, 2006, 06:37:03 PM »



The Emperor is now sitting ON the plane...



Offline frimousse

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #9 on: March 29, 2006, 06:39:14 PM »
General view of the plane


Offline frimousse

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #10 on: March 29, 2006, 06:41:50 PM »
The Emperor holds a conversation with Sikorsky


Offline frimousse

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #11 on: March 29, 2006, 06:58:17 PM »
The Imperial Air Force owned also such planes !! French "Voisin", they were two on board: the pilot and the one who dropped the bombs !!

My great grand father, lieutenant in the Russian Imperial Air Force during the WW I use to fligh in such a vehicle... :-[

Offline frimousse

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #12 on: March 29, 2006, 07:20:15 PM »
Quote
The Provisional Government even allowed women to train as combat pilots though I don't think any actually served in action.

I have a very poor copy of the flying certificate of Princess Dolgoruki who qualified in 1917.

Many officers & men of the Imperial Air Service went over to the Whites in 1918/19 and flew in action on all the civil war fronts.

Phil T

The first woman to fly in Russia was Lydia Vissarionovna Zvereva (see below second row on the left with the hat) in Gatchina, Saint Petersburg area. She received her qualification in august 1911 the same year as my great grand father (the third from the left second row). She had the licence number 31 !!!

But of course she didn't serve into the army during the WW I, which was not the case of most of the men on the photography.

She died tragically of typhus in 1916 ( aged 25) and was buried in Saint Nicholas cemetery in Saint Petersburg.

Lydia married Wladimir Sliousarenko who had opened a plane factory, where she hold a school for future aviators...
Other women have followed her example and were enthusiastic: some pupils of Lydia: Lioubov Galantchikova, princess Eugénie ( Evgenia) Schakhovskaya, Eudoxie (Evdokia) Anatra who received their diploma soon after Lydia.
Also S Popova, a Moscovite, and after 1912 Elena Somsonova, princess Sophie Dolgorouky, V Tchouprina, Nadejda Degtariova, Marie Kourpieva were the first Russian women to fly on the air...
So before the Revolution, women in Imperial Russia were not the last to benefit from modernity !!

At this time aviators where considered as true heroes (like the first men on the moon in the 60ies), they were famous and praised.



Photo Bulla

from the book in Russian
"In the Sky of Russia"
W W Korol
Ed Polytechnika
Saint Petersburg 1995
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by frimousse »

Offline AGRBear

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2006, 10:41:39 AM »
There are web sites that tell us about the Russian WWI  flying Aces.  If you're lucky, sometimes you can run across some fly boy's personal diary or limited published book which has a fly boy's biography with old photographs.

As I find them,  I'll place here the URLs to some of the Russian web sites:

(1)
#
http://www.wwiaviation.com/aces/aces.shtml

There are individual photographs of fly boys and some information with each.

The air boys found on the above web site are:

       
Pilot's Name

Alexander A. Kozakov
Vasili Yanchenko
Pavel V. Argeyev
Ivan W. Smirnov
Grigory Suk
Donat Makeenok
Yevgraph Kruten
Valdimir Strizhesky
Ivan Loiko
Alexander Seversky
Konstantin Vakulovsky
Victor Fedorov
Juri Gilsher
Nikolai Kokorin
Ernst Leman
Ivan Orlov
Alexander Pishvanov
Eduard Pulpe
Mikhail Safonov

(2)
#http://wio.ru/ww1a/ace1.htm

This particular site shows photographs as well as medals of various air boys.

(3)
#http://wio.ru/ww1a.htm

This shows photographs of various kinds of Russian aircraft and when you're finished looking at them, click on "home" on the bottom of the pags and it'll take you to other subjects like armor trains in WWI, etc.  etc.

If you find other web sites,  please add them.

AGRBear
« Last Edit: December 31, 1969, 06:00:00 PM by AGRBear »
"What is true by lamplight is not always true by sunlight."

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alixaannencova

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Re: Airplanes (well, almost...)
« Reply #14 on: July 17, 2007, 10:05:27 AM »
I would like to know more about the role played by Grand Duke Alexander Mikhailovich's role as Inspector General (?) of the Imperial Air Force and how the hierarchy of the air force was structured. Did any member of the family have a keen interest in the airship division. I am not sure whether Airships were designated seperately as in England where the RFC and RNAS has sepearte arms for airship operations, does anyone know if the same sort of thing was done in Russia.