Author Topic: Court Journals of Nicholas II  (Read 7226 times)

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Offline Joanna

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Court Journals of Nicholas II
« on: December 14, 2004, 09:44:52 PM »
In 'The Companion Guide to St. Petersburg' by Kyril Zinovieff, there is a reference to the Court Journals of the period of Nicholas II. They have been "...recently released into the public domain, [and] make it clear that Nicholas spent about a third of his time in the Lower Dacha [Peterhof], often when the official communique indicated that he had left St. Petersburg for Tsarskoye Selo..." Has anyone seen or know more about these Court Journals?

Joanna

Offline hikaru

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Re: Court Journals of Nicholas II
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2005, 03:34:20 PM »
Court Journals was not only of Nicholas times.
There are Court Journals from Elizaveth Petrovna Times.
The court journals are  the kind something between every day calendar schedule and diary.
The court Journals are in the History Archive in Petersburg.

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Re: Court Journals of Nicholas II
« Reply #2 on: June 30, 2005, 09:17:28 PM »
Quote
In 'The Companion Guide to St. Petersburg' by Kyril Zinovieff, there is a reference to the Court Journals of the period of Nicholas II. They have been "...recently released into the public domain, [and] make it clear that Nicholas spent about a third of his time in the Lower Dacha [Peterhof], often when the official communique indicated that he had left St. Petersburg for Tsarskoye Selo..." Has anyone seen or know more about these Court Journals?

Joanna


Many thanks, Joanna.

The following from 'Katia: Wife before God', casts an interesting light on the subject of Court Journals.

"The Czar's life was usually an open book, not only to his entourage but to all his subjects. Almost his every move, every visit, every event---in short, almost every minute of his existence on earth---was made public, recorded, checked, double-checked, entered in several books especially kept for the purpose, viewed and reviewed by countless courtiers from high rank to low. Moreover, the "Imperial activities" were planned far in advance; specially bound booklets in red leather covers were printed for each occasion. Parades, church holidays (there were thirty-four yearly "non-working" days, aside from Sundays), visits to the Guard and Army regiments on various occasions---all these events were rigidly observed and personally attended by the Czar. Receptions for foreign sovereigns, diplomats, dignitaries, "family dinners" (there were thirty-two male and female Romanovs at that time), the "name's days" or "Saint's days" of relatives---events which were even more important in Russia than birthdays---funerals, baptisms, various marriages of relatives---all occupied the Czar. Finally, but not least of all, the "state affairs," the meetings with the cabinet ministers, took a great deal of the Czar's daytime hours. He was almost never alone."

The following isn't related to Court Journals, but because it followed in the book, thought it might be of interest.

"The autocrats "homework" occupied most of his time at night (provided there were no state dinners, theater performances, or balls). From the Czar's diaries we know that "state papers" meant reading "voluminous" reports from the four corners of the immense Russian Empire. Every report in those days (actually up to 1917) according to strict regulations, had to be handwritten. The home "reading" as it was universally done in Russia by all the officials, took place "after supper," that is, after 10 or 11 p.m. Time and time again the imperial diarist would more: "Worked on papers late after supper," or "I've read late---masses of papers to study," and so on. Every Russian sovereign, particularly Alexander II, wrote every resolution, decision, and answer sometimes on several pages, in his own handwriting. The custom of employing "secretaries" had not been renewed since Catherine the Great's time."

Sunny



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Re: Court Journals of Nicholas II
« Reply #3 on: July 01, 2005, 10:21:33 PM »
Thank you for the interesting information, Sunny. Makes me glad that fate and fortune passed me over for such an existance. It sounds almost claustrophobic, doesn't it. (Like the schedule present day royals are on too.)

Offline Forum Admin

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Re: Court Journals of Nicholas II
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2005, 08:49:39 AM »
These are the records that help us to know that Rasputin visited the Palace only a handful of times, and not for very long periods. They are also good evidence for how impossible it would have been for Alexandra to have had any of the rumoured affairs etc.

Offline BobAtchison

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Re: Court Journals of Nicholas II
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2005, 01:11:20 PM »
As a note - Court Journals were not maintained at the Lower Palace or at Livadia - these were personal homes of the Romanovs, not court palaces.

Offline lexi4

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Re: Court Journals of Nicholas II
« Reply #6 on: July 02, 2005, 09:50:27 PM »
Quote
As a note - Court Journals were not maintained at the Lower Palace or at Livadia - these were personal homes of the Romanovs, not court palaces.



Bob,
Does this mean that while at the Lower Palace or at Livadia no official records were kept of arrivals and departures or anything else?
Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely, in a pretty and well preserved body; but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming, "Wow ---- What a ride!!!"

Offline BobAtchison

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Re: Court Journals of Nicholas II
« Reply #7 on: July 04, 2005, 09:25:18 AM »
The police kept records at the gates of who came in and who left but - as far as I know - the big, beautiful and elaborate court journals were not kept at Livadia or the Lower Palace and that is why we know less about what went on there on a daily basis.

I have photocopies of a number of pages and have put translations of them up on the site.

Offline Joanna

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Re: Court Journals of Nicholas II
« Reply #8 on: August 15, 2005, 12:26:08 AM »
Quote
As a note - Court Journals were not maintained at the Lower Palace or at Livadia - these were personal homes of the Romanovs, not court palaces.


From reading of Nicholas' diaries, the Farm in Peterhof was used for meetings with his ministers/courtiers,  luncheons with family members etc. and the large palace for formal receptions/regimental reviews etc. Is it possible court journals were maintained for these venues?

Joanna